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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 1833 02607 2857 



(Gc 975.702 C38y 1923 

Year book city o-f 
Charleston, S, C. 



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X 



AHen County Public Library 

900 We'oste' Street 

PO ^04. 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 







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CITY or CHARLESTON 

SOUTH CAROLINA 



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i Pl^^^y^Ml^^^l^gi^M^MIMIMMI^MI^IU^^I^L^^^^ 



YEARBOOK 



1925 




CITY or CHARLESTON 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



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PRESSES OF 

J. J. FURLONO & SON, CHAKLKSTON PRINTING UOUSI 

1924 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



MAYOR AND ALDERMEN 
Elected Dec. 9, 1919 Inaugurated Dec. 15, 1919 



Mayor 
Hon. JOHN P. GRACE 



Mayor Pro Tkm. 

1920— DANIEL L. SINKLER 
1921— H. R BARKERDING 
1922— W. R LIVINGSTON 
1923— NICHOLAS SOTTILE 



Clerk of Council— ^CLIFFORD THOMPSON 
Mayor's Secretary— *^=^ALBET HOOPER 



ALDERMEN 

Ward One — Daniel L. Sinkler, "^^^Oscar E. Johnson. 
Ward Two — A. C. Thompson, F. M. Robertson. 
Ward Three — John P. Michel, Vincent Chicco. 
Ward Four — Nicholas Sottile, George F. Musladin. 
Ward Five — Walter F. Livingston, John J. Madden. 
Ward Six — Harry F. Barkerding, J. Campbell Bissell. 
Ward Seven — FOn L. Rhett, John J. F^urlong. 



*Succeeded Joseph C. Barbot. 
**SfUCceeded Anthony J. McKevIin. 
***Died October 10, 1923. 



iv City Government 

Ward Kiglit— A. J. VV. Gorse, G. J. Knobeloch. 

Ward Ninc^-John F. Riley, D. L. Jervey. 

Ward Ten— F. H. Bold, E. L. Jacobs. 

Ward Eleven— ****John Wohltmann, H. D. Harken. 

Ward Twelve — C. W. Tollncr, H. G. Senseney. 

Standing Committi:es of City Council 

Ways and Means — Sinkler, Chairman; Barkerding, Liv- 
ingston, Gorse, Riley, Sottile, Wohltmann, Rhett and the 
Mayor. 

Streets — Livingston, Chairman; Bold, Jervey, Furlong, 
Gorse, Sottile, Wohltmann, Michel and the Mayor. 

Lighting the City — Riley, Chairman; Michel, Chicco, 
Johnson and the Mayor. 

Water Supply — Gorse, Chairman; Livingston, Musladin, 
Tollner, Robertson, Jervey and the Mayor. 

Sanitary Matters— Musladin, Chairman; Bold, Harken, 
Furlong and the Mayor. 

Railroads — Barkerding, Chairman; Thompson, Sinkler, 
Harken, Chicco, Tollner and the Mayor. 

Electric Wires — Wohltmann, Chairman; Madden, Fur- 
long, and the Mayor. 

Tidal Drains — Michel, Chairman; Jacobs and Jervey. 

Accounts — Rhett, Chairman; Sottile and the Mayor. 

Engrossed Bills and Official Bonds — Robertson, Chair- 
manman; Senseney and Thompson. 

Journals and Vacant Offices — Bissell, Chairman; Tollner 
and Furlong. 

Printing and Legislative Matters — Furlong, Chairman; 
Bissell and Musladin. 

City Hall, Clocks and Chimes — Jervey, Chairman ; Har- 
ken and Chicco. 

City Lands and Public Buildings^ — Tollner, Chairman; 
Robertson and Riley. 

Wood and Brick Buildings — Madden, Chairman; Rhett, 
and Tollner. 



=Died Augush. 7, 1923. 



City Government v 

Fire Escapes — Knobeloch, Chairman; Senseney and 
Johnson. 

Claims and Contracts — Senseney, Chairman; Musladin, 
Thompson, Sinkler and the Mayor. 

Steam Engines — Jacobs, Chairman; Riley and Madden. 

Artesian Wells and Lots — Johnson, Chairman; Riley, 
and Bold. 

Port and Harbor Improvement — Chicco, Chairman, Bar- 
kerding and Thompson. 

Pleasure Grounds — Harken, Chairman; Michel, Gorse, 
Livingston and the Mayor. 

Public Charities — Bold, Chairman; Jervey and Sinkler. 

Public Education — Sottile, Chairman; Bold and Bar- 
kerding. 

Public Safety — Thompson, Chairman; Madden and the 
Mayor. 

CITY OFFICERS. 

Clerk of Council Clifford Thompson 

City Treasurer..... W. S. Smith 

City Assessor A. H. Brouthers 

Recorder Theodore D. Jervey 

Corporation Counsel John I. Cosgrove 

City Sheriff Theo. Poppen 

Health Officer J. Mercier Green, M. D. 

Food Inspector F. H. Bold, M. D. 

Assistant Food Inspector .H. T. Soubeyroux 

Assistant Food Inspector John J. Regan 

City Engineer J. H. Dingle 

Assistant Engineer Gedney M. Howe 

Assistant Engineer B. M. Thompson 

City Eletcrician I'On Simmons 

Assistant City Electrician Martin J. Hanley 

Inspector of Meters John A. Livingston 

Building Inspector James Coles 

Inspector of Plumbing Thomas F. Carey 

City Bacteriologist C. D. Boette, M. D. 



vi City Government 

City Veterinarian .B. Kater Mclnnes, M. D. 

Chief Sanitary Inspector George Hartnett 

Chief of PoHce James R. Cantvvell 

Chief of Fire Department Louis Behrens 

First Assistant Chief of Fire Department J. J. Bennett 

Second Assistant Chief G. H. Bencdikt 

Third Assistant Chief J. H. Wohlers 

Inspector of Licenses W. C. Hauck 

Park Supervisor Wm. M. Jennings 

CITY COURT 

Recorder Theodore D. Jervey 

Corporation Counsel John I. Cosgrove 

Assistant Corporation Counsel Joseph A. Patla 

Sheriff Theo. Poppen 

Clerk - Clifford Thompson 

BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

Board of Equalization 

Alderman Daniel L. Sinkler, Chairman; H. F. Barker- 
ding, W. F. Livingston, A. J. W. Gorse, John F. Riley 
and Nicholas Sottile. 

Secretary — John C. Mehrtens, County Auditor. 

Meets first Tuesday in March, at 12 M., in ever year, 
at Fireproof Building. 

Health Department 

Board of Health — A. P. Aimar, Chairman; (term ex- 
pires 1924) ; J. Mercier Green, M. D., Health Officer and 
Secretary; A. Johnston Buist, M. D., (term expires 1925) ; 
C. D. Boette, M. D., (term expires 1924) ; Isaac Marks, 
(term expires 1925) ; H. A. Molony, (term expires 1926) ; 
C. C. Tighe, (term expires 1924) ; and Alderman H. F. 
Barkerding and the Mayor. 



City Government vii 

Clerk of Health Department — Lester Schwartzberg. 
Public Health Nurse — Miss Agnes E. Coogan. 
The Board of Health meets first Tuesday of every month 
at 5 :00 P. M. 

Sanitary Inspectors. 

George Hartnett, Chief; J. L. Hunt, M. J. Barry, R. 
T. Cain, E. M. Barry, J. H. Mindermann, Geo. H. Zerbst, 
Julius Von Santen and Frank Wierse. 

Water Department. 

Commissioners of Public Works — J. Ross Hanahan, 
Chairman, (term expires December, 1925) ; Leland Moore, 
Vice-Chairman, (term expires December, 1927) ; Julius 
H. Jahnz, (term expires December, 1923) ; Hon. John P. 
Grace, Mayor, ex-officio, and Alderman A. J. W. Gorse, 
Chairman of the Committee on Water Supply, ex-officio. 

Secretary — Clifford Thompson. 
Treasurer and Asst. Secretary — E. Earle Evans. 
Manager and Engineer — J. E. Gibson. 
Attorney— Geo. H. Moffett. 

Sewer Commission. 

T. Grange Simons, M. D., Chairman, (term expires 
1928) ; R. S. Cathcart, M. D., (term expires 1924) ; J. D. 
W. Claussen, (term expires 1926) ; Maurice J. Hartnett, 
(term expires 1925) ; George F. Scott, (term expires 1927) ; 
J. Mercier Green, M. D., Health Officer, and the Mayor. 

Secretary — J. D. W. Claussen. 

Sewerage Engineer — J. H. Dingle. 

Meets first Tuesday in every month at 1 P. M. 

Board of Plumbing Examiners. 

J. Merceir Green, M. D., Health Officer (ex-officio) 
Chairman; Leo Simmonin and Joseph H. Due. 



viii City Government 

Board of Firk masters 

John H. Steenken, Chairman; Henry P. Williams, 

Vice-Chairman ; A. J. Riley, Julius J. Brown, John P. 

Michel, D. L. Jervey, Theo. Poppen, John J. Madden, 
and the Mayor. 

Clerk, Chief Louis Behrens. 

Meets first Wednesday in every month at 6 P. M. , 

Firemen's Insurance and Inspection Fund 

John H. Steenken Chairman, Board of Fire Masters 

W. S. Smith City Treasurer 

Louis Behrens Chief, Fire Department 

Herman Brunning (1924) Plenry P. Williams (1924) 

Police Department 

Chief of Police, James R. Cantwell. 
First Lieutenant, Louis L. Miller. 
Second Lieutenant, Frank A. Owens. • 
Third Lieutenant, Julius E. Horn. 

Police Pension and Relief* Fund. 

Commissioners^ — Julius H. Jahnz, term expires Jan- 
uary, 1925 ; M; V. Haselden, term expires January, 1926, 
and the Mayor. 

Management, Care and Custody of Convicts. 

Commissioners — Alderman John Wohltmann, Chair- 
man; C. M. Gibson, Vice-Chairman; John M. Semken, 
Secretary; Aldermen Vincent Chicco and A. W. Wieters. 

Meets third Monday in every month, at 8:30 P. M. 
at City Hall. 



City Government ix 

Port Utilities Commission. 

M. Rutledge Rivers, Chairman ; Walter Pringle, Joshua 
L. David (term expires 1927), Albert Sottile and Henry 
A. Molony (term expires 1923), elective commissioners; 

A. Foster McKissick, Greenville, and Bright William- 
son of Darlington (term expires 1923) appointive by the 
Governor. 

Hon. John P. Grace, Mayor, and Alermen H. F. 
Barkerding, Chairman, Committee on Railroads of City 
Council, (Ex-officio.) 

Charleston Traffic Bureau 

Aldermen, H. F. Barkerding Chairman; H. G. Leiding, 
W. H. Logan, W. L. Douglas, and J. M. Whitsett, and 
Aldermen W. F. Livingston, and Clifford Thompson. 

Commissioner, Thomas J. Burke. 

Harbor Commissioners. 

Hon. John P. Grace, Mayor, ex-officio, Chairman ; H. 
A. Molony, Vice-Chairman ; J. Palmer Denham, Louis D. 
Simonds, Henry P. Williams, James M. Seignious, A. W. 
Litschgi, Sr., John L. Sheppard, Capt. G. H. Swan, Robert 
Wilson, M. D., and P. PL Gadsden. 

Harbor Master and Secretary — James Armstrong. 

Port Warden — James D. Lucas. 

Bathing PIouse Commission 

James Sottile, Chairman, Walter Prause, Secretary; 
Theo. W. Passailaigue, Mrs. James Cosgrove, Mrs. Ralph 
Elias, Mrs. Henry W. deSaussure, John F. Runey, Miss 
Susan P. Frost. 

Abattoir Commission. 

John J. Miller, Chairman; Louis Karesh, Secretary; E. 
W. Durant, A. Clifford Thompson and Wm. C. Kennerty. 



X City Government 

Marki'T Commission. 

J. J. Miller, Chairman; C. F. Cade, Secretary; A. J. W. 
Gorse, Charles Heffron, C. M. Benedict, Daniel F. Craig 
and Vincent Chicco. 

Clerk — Frank Scarpa. 

Clerk of Weights and Measures — Louis Seel. 

Meets first Wednesday of every month at 8 P. M. 

Commissioners of Public Lands. 

A. Clifford Thompson, Chairman ; Martin T. Powers, 
Vice-Chairman ; A. Marion Stone, Secretary; Fred W, 
Wagener, Patrick Carter, H. W. H. Buck, Harry J. Han- 
cock, H. D. Harken, James P. Magrath, Harry Kangetcr, 
G. D. Guida, and Plarry Wllensky. 

Meets first Tuesday of every Month at 8 P. M. at 
Market Hall. 

Charleston Home. 

Commissioners — ^John F. O'Rourke, Chairman ; Henry 
Simonhoff, Secretary; John H. Steenken, W. J. H. Brandt, 
Mrs. Patrick Carter, Leon S. Brux, Theodore Poppen, 
Mrs. Annie S. Walker, Walter F. Livingston, Matthew- 
McLaughlin, Mrs. J. Sumter Rhame and W. G. Stemmer- 
mann. 

Superintendent — W. H. Pieper. 

Matron — Mrs. W. H. Pieper. 

Clerk — Thos. J. Liddy. 

Meets twice a month on alternate Mondays at 8 P. M. 

William Enston Home. 

Trustees — Arthur Lynah, President; C. R. Valk, First 
Vice-President; S. E. Welch, Second Vice-President; Geo. 
W. Williams, E. H. Pringle, T. S. Wilbur, F. M. Robertson, 



City Government xi 

Thomas W. Carroll, John D. Muller, Thos. S. Sinkler, 
George H. Moffett, W. W. Shackelford, and the Mayor. 

Secretary — F. M. Robertson. 

Acting Superintendent — Miss B. F. Colson. 

Meets fourth Wednesday of every month. 

Charlkston Orphan House:. 

Commissioners — Walter Pringle, Chairman; Sidney S. 
Riggs, Vice-Chairman ; W. Hampton Logan Vice-Chairman 
Pro Tem; Andrew B. Murray, Henry A. Molony, Melvin 
Furchgott, Otto F. Wieters, I. W. Hirsch, A. Cramer 
Koster, Robert H. Duryea, Henry H. Ficken, and Ellison 
A. WiHiams. 

Engineer — Ashley L. Barton. 

Physician — T. Grange Simons, M. D. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Edward H. Pinckney. 

Meets every Thursday at 5:00 P. M. 

City Orphan Asylum. 

Commissioners — W. J. Storen, Chairman; J. L. David, 
Vice-Chairman ; Mrs. A. J. Riley, Secretary ; W. J. Condon, 
A. W. Litschgi, Sr., W. H. Behrens, J. B. Fleming, John 
J. Furlong, Mrs. Santo Sottile, and Mrs. Mary Cherry 
Burke. 

Meets first Wednesday in every month. 

Shirras Dispfnsary. 

Trustees — Robert Wilson, M. D., President of Medical 
Society of South Carolina; M. Rutledge Rivers, President 
of the St. Andrews Society, and the Mayor. 

Juvenile Weleare Commission. 

Mrs. Henry C. Cheves, Chairman; (term expires, 1923), 
Mrs. Rex. Fuller, (term expires 1925), W. B. Wilbur, 



xii City Government 

(term expires 1923), John E. Gibbs, (term expires 1923), 
P. M. Macmillan, (term expires 1925), Mrs. Katherine 
Reynolds, (term expires 1925). 

COLLI-GK OF ChARLKSTON. 

Trustees (elected by the Board) — Hon. John F. Fickcn, 
President, (term expires 1927) ; Hon. Henry A. M. Smith, 
Vice-President, (term expires 1930) ; J. Waties Waring, 
(term expires 1926) ; Montague Triest, (term expires 
1928) ; M. Rutledge Rivers, (term expires 1929) ; Hon. 
Huger Sinkler, (term expires 1923); J. R. P. Ravenel, 
(term expires 1924) ; and E. H. Pringle, (term expires 
1925). 

Trustees (Nominated by the Alumni Association) — Paul 
M. Macmillan, (term expires 1927) ; F. O. O'Neill, (term 
expires 1923) ; and E. Kennerly Marshall, (term expires 
1925). 

Representatives of City Council — Hon. John P. Grace, 
Mayor, (ex-officio, term expires 1923) ; Hon. Theo. D. 
Jervey, (City Recorder, (ex-officio) ; Alderman Jno. F. 
Riley, (term expires 1923); John I. Cosgrove, (term ex- 
pires 1923) ; and Dr. T. Grange Simons, (term expires 
1923). 

Secretary— J. C. Ball. 

Charleston Museum. 

Trustees — Charles P. Aimar, M. D., Richard H. Allan, 
W. Roscoe Bonsai, A. Johnston Buist, M. D., Thomas W. 
Carroll, David . Doar, Frederick H. Horlbeck, Colonel 
George P. Howell, Daniel E. Huger, Charles W. Kollock, 
M. D., Oscar W. Schleeter, Jesse Sharpe, J. Betts Simmons, 
Edward A. Simons, Thomas S. Sinkler, James Sottile, 
Charles Stevens, Samuel G. Stoney, J. Swinton Whaley, 
P^llison A. Vvllliams. 

Ex-Officio : 

John P. Grace, Mayor, Aldermen John J. Furlong and 



City Government xiii 

John P. Michel, Albert W. Todd, Senator, Charleston 
County; The President of the Charleston Central Labor 
Union, Lester Keller. 

President— Charles W. Kollock, M. D. 

Vice-President — Charles Stevens. 

Secretary — Edward A. Simons. 

Treasurer — Oscar W. Schleeter, 

Director — Laura M. Bragg. 

High School. 

Trustees— M. V. Hasleden, President; W. C. Miller, 
Vice-President; F. Q. O'Neill, Hon. Henry A. M. Smith, 
M. B. Barkley, M. Rutledge Rivers, Aldermen Nicholas 
Sottile, John Wohltmann, and the Mayor. 

Secretary — Joseph C. Barbot. 

Board of Public School Commissioners. 

George H. Moffett, Chairman; Montague Triest, T. W. 
Passailaigue, C. D. Boette, M. D., Joseph Y. McElveen, 
W. C. Wilbur, F. O. O'Neill, E. Kennerly Marshall and 
M. Rutledge Rivers. 

Clerk — A. Burnet Rhett. 

Meets first Wednesday of every month at 6 :00 P. M. 

Industrial School for Colored Orphans. 

Commissioners— F. R. Frost*, Chairman, (term expires 
1925) ; rOn L. Rhett, (term expires 1926) ; A. J. Riley, 
(term expires 1927) ; Joseph C. Dillingham, (term expires 
1923) ; and H. F. Lewith, (term expires 1924). 

Park Commission. 

Samuel Lapham, Chairman; Howard J. Adams, Vice- 
Chairman; W. J. Storen, Charles R. Valk, James Sottile, 
Henry VonGlahn, Arnoldus Vander Horst, Norman S. Lea, 



*Resigned January 24, 1922. 



xiv City Government 

M. Prystowsky, Mrs. Isaac Marks, Mrs. Jolin J. Furlong, 
Mrs. Joseph A. Patki and the Mayor. 

Secretary — Henry Von Glahn. 

Park Superivsor — Wni. M. Jennings. 

Meets third Tuesday in every month, at 6:00 P. M., at 
City Hall. 

Colonial Common and Ashley Rivkr Embankment. 

Commissioners — R. P. Evans, Chairman; Robert C. 
Richardson, Vice-Chairman; Robert C. Lebby, Secretary, 
J. N. Nathans, Treasurer; John M. Rivers, A. W. Litschgi, 
Sr., Edv^ard J. Murphy, Charles Cuthbert, Clarence C. 
Waring, A. E. Baker, M. D., and the Mayor. 

Marion Square. 

Commissioners — Col. H. O. Withington, Chairman; Col. 
O. J. Bond, ex-officio; Capt. W. H. Hawkins, Capt. J. L. 
Gantt, H. L. Erckmann, J. N. Nathans and Charles Mauro. 

Municipal Playgrounds. 

Commissioners — Mrs. John C. Tiedeman, Chairman; 
Mrs. Manning Simons, Vice-Chairman ; Mrs. J. PI. C. 
Wulbern , Secretary; Miss Louisa B. Poppenheim, Mrs. J. 
S. Farnum, George C. Rogers, The Rev. S. Cary Beckw^ith 
and H. F. Barkerding. 

Meets first Wednesday in every month, at 4:30 P. M., 
at the City Hall. 

Charleston Art Commission. 

Hon. John P. Grace, Mayor ; W. C. Miller, Carolina Art 
Association; the Rev. Robert Wilson, D. D., Charleston 
Library Society ; Miss Laura M. Bragg, Director Charleston 
Museum; Miss Eola Willis, Thos. R. Waring and Albert 
Simons. 

Examiners Motion Picture Operators 

Louis Behrens, ex-officio; POn Simons, ex-officio; and 
H. R. Meyer. 



Mayoc Grace's Annual Review 



To the Gentlemen of City Council: 

Called upon by custom to make an annual report to your 
Honorable Body, I take this occasion to account publicly in 
full for our stewardship, not for the past year only, but 
for our whole administration. 

I consented to become a candidate again only when it 
was insisted by my friends that we were in the midst of 
vital public enterprises conceived and established by us and 
demanding our continued service. I hesitated to believe 
these enterprises depended upon any man or set of men. 
It would be bad indeed if they did. Men must come and 
men must go, but our City must go on forever. The further 
view, however, was urged that because of these enterprises 
no one would oppose me and that unless I consented a 
precious year would be lost in politics that should be devoted 
to works of construction. I yielded to this suggestion to 
prevent a mere scramble for office at this highly construc- 
tive time. It was my extreme good fortune to have stood 
with a Board of Aldermen, which in the essential appeals 
of citizenship was above reproach. Man for man, ticket 
for ticket, not by any mischance did it seem possible that 
the common sense people of Charleston would prefer to our 
ticket the ticket of our opponents. 

THE KLAN AND THE MILITIA. 

But alas, it was not to be so. A campaign was forced 
upon us and our city has passed through perhaps the bit- 
terest year in its political history. Factions have been 
drawn up in battle array and appeals made, not upon eco- 
nomic grounds which should mainly influence elections, but 
upon the challenge of our American right to worship God 
in our own way. We have been faced in Charleston during 
the past months with the Ku Klux Klan, and it has been 
necessary for me to tear the mask from the face of bigotry. 



XVI 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



As bitter as the campaign has been I look back upon it 
with regret chiefly because our City which has suffered so 
much in the past from military despotism during Recon- 
struction, saw at the polls on election day, while we were in 
the midst of profound peace, the Militia of the State, clad 
in all the accoutrements of War. We saw our election 
booths, where our fair women were voting for the first 
time in municipal elections, invaded by soldiers, and we 
saw our wives and mothers, some of them on the verge 
of new motherhood, casting their ballots with bayonets at 
their breasts and under the muzzles of machine guns. 

But as dastardly as was the stigma of the Militia, it was 
all the more so Ijccause unnecessary. It was meeting peace 
with violence ; it was overawing the electorate when it was 
manifest by actual numbers that the election need not be 
stolen. There was an over-readiness to commit fraud which 
was not justified even by the poor excuse of defeat. 

Eight years before, at an election in which the Militia 
for the first time disgraced our City since the days of 
Reconstruction but did not leave the Armories until after 
the election was stolen, conceivably it might have been 
thought necessary to preserve by force the fruits of fraud. 
Then the vote was close, and to preserve the 'Victory" it 
was necessary in the language of one of the contestants to 
''throw out the Ward Ten Box at all hazards". This high- 
handed theft of a ballot box was naturally expected to 
arouse outrage, and the troops of a tyrannical governor 
were ready for eventualities. 

These circumstances, however, were absent from this 
recent occasion. The election was not even close. No 
boxes needed to be thrown out at any hazard; no blows, 
not even hot words had passed, but the troops moved to 
the polls early in the day, took possession of the balloting, 
counted the votes, and accompanied the returns to head- 
quarters. 

Only twice in American politics during the one hundred 
and fifty years of our independence and our thousands of 
national, state and municipal elections has the Militia been 
present at the polls, and then only when or after the country 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review xvii 

was in the midst of War. In these cases our Courts prop- 
erly held that if the presence of the Militia affected the re- 
sult the election should be declared against those who by the 
use of force violated the first principle of elections — free- 
dom of the ballot. Rest assured that could I have been 
convinced that the presence of the Militia had affected the 
result I would have been the first to appeal from force to 
justice. It was only because I saw, incredible as it seemed, 
that we had been outvoted, perhaps, however, by illegal 
non-resident Klansman votes, and that the Militia had not 
entered materially into the result, that I made no protest. 
I am satisfied by an analysis of the vote that there was 
wholesale fraud. Let us hope that an administration com- 
posed of men and women, be they ever so good, elected 
in this enlightened age practically solely upon the issue of 
bigotry and willing to debase our institutions by the use 
of the Militia to make fraud safe, can maintain for our 
City that good will of our countrymen, without which 
nothing American can prosper. 

FOUR YE'ARS OF ACHIEVEMENT. 

In laying down our power it is indeed gratifying that we 
can look back upon four years of achievement. This ad- 
ministration can be understood in all of those achievements 
only by a review of the previous administration over which 
I had the honor to preside, which began twelve years ago 
and of which not all of the "present administration were a 
part. It is necessary thus to go back, because questions are 
involved more than those merely of administration. 

Twelve years ago I was elected after a campaign in which 
our public opinion had been aroused along new lines. We 
cannot understand that campaign without a knowledge of 
the history of Charleston. We had been a city in America 
for two hundred and fifty years. But we had not been a 
city of America. On the contrary, we had developed a 
unique status. As an American city we were in a class by 
ourselves. It was precisely because I maintained that we 
must become like unto our sister American cities that I led 



xvili Mayor Grace's Animal Review 

the revolution of twelve years ago, and that is probably the 
reason why my course has been condemned by those who 
cling to the established order of things and who were at all 
times willing to invoke the power even of the Militia to 
defeat me. It will be recalled that while the Militia was not 
so employed in 1911 when I was first elected (Governor 
Blease was then our Governor) every sinister use of force 
by the Charleston Police, then in the hands of the old 
regime, was resorted to. Had Governor Manning, the true 
representative of the old bourbons, been governor, undoubt- 
edly even then the troops would have marmed the polls. 
He was governor in 1915, when against the protest of City 
Council they were sent here for the first time. Governor 
McLeod simply became his worthy understudy in the re- 
cent election. 

Let us consider our past. Not once, but times without 
number, visitors have come to Charleston, and as they 
looked around they saw on all sides the handiwork of God 
in the making of a great seaport. Many of them had come 
here with the idea that Charleston was a great metropolis. 
We had bulked large in the story of the Nation — we were 
known of in books — school boys had read about us and we 
had filled volumes in the debates of Congress. It v/as well 
known that we were an important city measured by the 
standards of those days long before the American Revo- 
lution, in which we had played a conspicuous part. Not 
only Boston, but we also had dumped tea into the harbor. 
The Declaration of Independence which was proclaimed 
here preceded the Declaration at Philadelphia. Our men 
of renown helped largely to write the Constitution of the 
United States, but alas, also, they forced into it the in- 
stitution of human slavery. Here it was that the first 
Naval battle of the Revolution w^as W'on, which was the 
latest victory, but one, over a British Fleet until its defeat 
at Jutland. It was our Calhoun who more than any other 
man brought on the War of 1812. In the bosom of our 
City itself the mother of Andrew Jackson, the hero of that 
War, lies buried somewhere in an unmarked grave. It was 
our Palmetto Regiment that captured Chapultapac in the 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezu xix 

Mexican War. And notoriously it was here that the Or- 
dinance of Secession was signed, and the first shot of the 
Civil War was fired. It was from here a hundred years 
ago that the first railroad in the United States, and at that 
time the longest in the World, was built, and more than a 
hundred years ago we built the Santee Canal. I mention 
these outstanding things because they are all correlated 
with my theme and show the stature of the men who guided 
our destiny until the close of the Civil War. 

THE CIVIL WAR AND AFTER. 

The reaction from all these mighty adventures, and es- 
pecially the last, the Civil War left us a broken, despondent 
and conservative people. At best, however, we had never 
been a liberal people. Even in the days when we were de- 
claring our independence, when we had the boldness to be 
the first upon this hemisphere to set up a republic, when we 
were doing afterwards those mighty things for the mastery 
of this section, we were not animated exactly by the prin- 
ciple of American liberty as commonly understood. If our 
ideas were not indeed monarchial, after the manner of 
the mother country, they were at least aristocratic. Farthest 
from our thoughts was the language of the Philadelphia 
Declaration that all men are ''created free and equal and 
entitled to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." If we 
were the first to strike for independence, if we were after- 
wards to the point of War jealous of the sovereignty of 
our State, it was because certain privileged families here 
believed that through their superiority they had the right 
to dispense government to the inferior masses, even among 
the whites. Negro slavery was the natural corrolary. This 
I fear, is why we seceded, though it was all unconscious to 
the immortal soldiery of the Confederate Army during the 
four glorious years of the Civil War. And when we were 
forcibly brought back into the Union, with all our best 
blood spilt, our fair countryside devastated and our City in 
ruins, our leaders accepted the new order of things only with 
great reserve. Government was still in their minds a thing 



XX Mayor Grace's Annua! Review 

of privilc£,^e. The masses were tolerated as having a part 
in our economic life to play. But the ancient and selfish 
aristocracy utterly contemned the idea that it was given by 
Heaven that numbers should rule. The masses should be 
the workers ; the hewers of wood, the drawers of water : 
fighters in time of War and common sufferers with them in 
the hour of defeat, but not the rulers of Charleston. I do 
not think I am misinterpreting the philosophy of our old 
ruling class. 

It was, therefore, not to be thought of that the chief 
magistrate of this City should be a man in sympathy with 
the masses. Just as this was the Charleston conception 
of things, it prevailed also in the State, which in the earlier 
scheme of things was Charleston. It was this Charleston 
arrogance filtering through the State that brought on the 
Tillman revolution. And it was because Tillman asserted 
and vindicated the righteous power of the masses that he 
w^s so bitterly condemned. But it was more an act of 
audacity on my part twelve years ago, far more unpardon- 
able for me, to stand for Mayor of Charleston than it had 
been for him to stand for Governor of South Carolina. 
Mine was an attack upon the citadel itself, while he only 
stormed the outworks. 

Our city government was handed down from one coterie 
to another for the sake of the honors of office and the con- 
servation of things as they were. I cannot recall that under 
the old regime government was ever used for progress. As 
a city we lay dead, or rather inert, while the rest of America 
moved forward. The first sign of our revival came when 
the United States Government through the power of Senator 
Tillman at Washington established the Navy Yard. Many 
of our best people dubiously shook their heads Vs^hen be- 
cause of it we began to see new faces on our streets for the 
first time in our generation — strangers who thought in 
American terms and ridiculed our conditions and our ''con- 
servatism." 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review xxi 

THE AWAKENING. 

One of the first things demanded by the United States 
Government as a pre-requisite for the Navy Yard was a 
supply of pure water. We had been living under the old 
limited system of artesian wells — when bath tubs were a 
luxury, and the ordinary conveniences a curiosity — when 
the town was without sewerage and the death rate was the 
highest in the world among the poor and the innocent in- 
fants. We were drinking cistern water. Because of our 
abominable insanitary conditions every kitchen was a ren- 
dezvous of flies and every bedroom was infested with mos- 
quitoes. Our population, in which the negroes far out- 
numbered the whites, had not increased from before the 
days of the Civil War. When the government demanded a 
water supply for the Navy Yard there was a characteristic 
response. It did not take the form of self reliance. We had 
then, as it afterwards proved, the power within ourselves 
of owning our water plant, but we hawked a franchise 
around from pillar to post until private foreign interests 
were induced to do the work. 

When twelve years ago my first administration came into 
power one of the standing unsolved problems was what to 
do about Goose Creek water. The builders were crippled 
without a franchise which the city had promised and the 
City Council was incapable of deciding whether or not to 
give them one. Council had been restrained from giving 
the franchise only by popular clamor through mass meet- 
ings of citizens and it was the general suspicion of Coun- 
cil's intentions aroused by these meetings and certain inci- 
dents connected with the refusal of the administration to 
grant an electric railway franchise that swung the minds 
of the electorate finally in our direction. This preference 
for private over public interests was further manifested 
when long previously the same regime, though of somewhat 
different personnel, had given a franchise for thirty years 
to the railroads to monopolize our waterfront. It is well 
known that again when those who were of that regime were 
about to renew that franchise ''under conditions", we came 



xxii Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

back into power because the people wanted us to refuse 
that franchise ''under any conditions" and REDEEM THE 
WATERFRONT. 

THE OLD STREETS. 

Twelve years ago not one single street, except around 
the Battery, was paved with smooth paving. Every square 
yard of smooth paving in the city today, including the re- 
paving of the Battery, has been laid down under laws en- 
acted by us and the work done under either this or our pre- 
vious administration, excepting only a slight yardage laid 
during the administration of Mayor Hyde, but under our 
laws and largely paid for by the present administration 
when w^e came back into power. It is important to em- 
phasize this because of the false propaganda spread con- 
cerning the paving of our city, under which it has been 
sought to prove that there should be in some mysterious 
way a division of credit. There can be NO division of the 
credit. It all belongs to us, not only because we conceived 
and carried out the program, but because we did so against 
the bitterest opposition. 

We have preserved photographs of some of the old 
streets — cobblestone, Belgian block and so-called '*dirt" 
streets in the very heart of the city. 

Life under these conditions was pestiferous. Our streets 
were noisy, filthy and impassable and those adjoining the 
public market had the distinction of being the only streets 
in the land infested by buzzards, seeking the carrion of the 
market-place thrown to them as scavengers. Far from 
being ashamed of these buzzards and their whimsical tricks, 
our **best citizens" took visitors to show off this civic at- 
traction and our newspapers copied articles from magazines 
upon the subject. What could better express the state of 
mind of Charleston of that period? 

Our market was a disgrace and our food, milk and meat 
supply a tragedy. The rejected meat of the nation was 
dumped in Charleston. For our fresh meat supply animals 
were slaughtered in back yards or at butcher pens within 



Mayor Grace's Animal Reviezv xxiii 

the city limits, where the familiar buzzard was parked on 
fences. These were the busy buzzards which worked the 
market down-town until noon and the butcher pens up- 
town afternoon. 

OTHER PRIMITIVE CONDITIONS. 

The schools were dangerous to the lives of our children 
firetraps and disease centers. 

We were cut oiT from communication by land but for 
one impassable road and one ramshackle bridge over which 
it was necessary to pay to walk out of town. 

OUR MORAL CONDITIONS 

The foregoing gives our economic and civic wretched- 
ness in barest outline, with many omissions of detail. But 
our moral conditions were the worst of all. Right in the 
heart of the city on the high road to Memminger School, 
where our innocent girls went daily, where the children 
passed through on their way to Bennett School, and our 
older boys to the College, and where on Sunday the people 
of several denominations passed on their vv^ay to church- 
publicly and vulgarly exposed to view lived denizens of the 
underworld. It was testified at public hearings by dele- 
gations of ladies and gentlemen appearing before me that 
they had approached many of my predecessors for relief 
from these abominations, but were told that Archdale and 
Beaufain Streets complained of, were two of the oldest 
streets in Charleston, and that the women of the under- 
world inhabited I'them befoji'e the ,schools and churches 
were built, and nothing would be done. It is with great 
pride that I record that for the first tim.e in our history I 
cleaned up these streets, and made them avenues of travel 
fit for innocent girls and boys, and the church goers of Char- 
leston. 

I revive memories of these evil things onty to nail the cal- 
umnies of my enemies, who have sought to associate wick- 
edness with my name in politics. Parenthetically, let me 



xxiv Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 

say that from the day of my first oath as Mayor the purely 
moral responsibility of my office has weighed heavily upon 
me. Never once was I responsible for social evil of any 
kind. I found it rampant in many forms, and its suppres- 
sion presented a problem that had to be worked out sanely 
with regard to human nature; it was always my thought 
that its dispersion was the worst of remedies. Keeping in 
mind always what I inherited officially, and the deep-rooted 
and far-reaching nature of some of these evils, it was ever 
with m.e only a question of how far I might go in their re- 
moval and yet keep within the bounds of realities. There 
were some things which, though they had existed always, 
I simply would not tolerate. Others I looked upon with a 
less impatient but with an intolerant eye. By and large the 
fact is that from the day on which to the amazement of the 
incredulous I banished liquor from campaigns, while my 
critics and sanctimonious adversaries wallowed in it, until 
now, when I am about to lay down responsibility under 
my oath of office I have looked only with disapproval upon 
vice in every form. I am not so hypocritical as to pre- 
tend that vice does not exist in Charleston, for alas some 
men and v/omen still love it and seek out haunts where they 
may practice it. The best we can do is to live virtuously 
ourselves, and thus by example prove that there is no such 
thing as "necessary evil". It is the duty of those charged 
with executive responsibility to preserve through the police 
"outward decency", and as has been well said "to prevent 
crime, not sin"; not to condone sin, however; but to draw 
rigidly the curtain of authority around its obscenity. 

Our city is freer from evil than ever, and let us hope it 
will never relapse into its former ways. 

THE RIGHT TO A LIVING WAGE. 

As an example of the views of our predecessors on the 
right of the average man to live, I need only mention the 
scale of wages and working conditions of the laborers on 
the streets and in the public works, including also the pay 
in the police, fire, park and other departments. It is not 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv xxv 

too much to say that the attitude of our ruling powers was 
precisely such as we found in the old relation of master 
and slave. It was considered enough that the laborer and 
worker should be allowed a bare living. Policemen who 
risked and often lost their lives were expected to raise and 
educate families on Fifty Dollars per month, and white 
men worked on the streets for a dollar a day. The teachers 
in our schools made little more than their bread and cloth- 
ing. In short, there was nothing generous, large-minded, 
progressive or liberal in the outlook of those who ruled 
Charleston and as a direct consequence thereof we had 
failed to improve our glorious opportunities. 

THE SECRET OF OUR DECAY. 

This has been the secret of our decay ; it is the answer to 
those who have come and inquired what has kept us back. 
That answer is OURSELVES. It is not pleasant to say 
these things, and less still has it been pleasant for me to 
strike out during the better part of my life against the 
principle of aristocracy which has ruined our city. It has 
involved only too often embarrassment to devoted friends. 
For we all have friends, good friends, who feel that we 
are rude when we insist that upon this democratic soil of 
ours there can be no room for privilege. To take umbrage 
because I attack "aristrcracy" is of course to admit that 
such a pretension exists, and that its privileges are claimed. 
Charleston is the only place where such an absurd preten- 
sion is set up in politics as reason for its opponent's defeat. 
The pity is that our community has so succumbed to the ab- 
surdity that resentment is felt not only by those whose long 
background of honorable distinction has given them some 
measure of ''aristocracy", but by all their nondescript servi- 
tors, who by climbing into congregations, societies, or fra- 
ternities feel entitled to out-herod them in reprisals. Until 
Charleston can be cured of the disease of toadyism I can 
see little hope for our future. 



xxvi Mayor Grace's Annual Revien) 

THE FIGHT FOR LIBERALISM. 

Of course my cure for it has been the arousal of the 
masses in disregard of their creeds or affihations by showing 
to them in years of weary effort the right of their numbers 
to rule. It was always a task to unite them even for one 
day at the polls. It required not only an unfailing heart 
but patience and capacity for agitation. Often in the work 
of agitation, when even the very cobblestones were being 
stirred to mutiny, harsh words were spoken and heated 
thoughts expressed. It is very easy to say that this, that 
or the other word should never have been spoken. But 
when the problem is to keep united if only until election 
day, and for the purpose of saving them from themselves, 
a mass of otherwise heterogenous voters whose divisions 
have meant the ruin of Charleston, much should be pardoned 
to an apostle of progress. Let us have progress even though 
harsh words must be spoken, and let the masses learn to 
stand true to their side and not to rush to that of their 
offended ''superiors" and Charleston will be saved. We see 
from the recent election how easy it is for those who have 
NEVER voted for progress and never will, to pass over 
their quarrels to what they in their hearts despise as the 
vulgar masses. My majorities have come from the wards 
in which the poorer people live. It was, as I say, a union 
of racial, social and religious units of all sorts and condi- 
tions of life who were led by common intuition to feel that 
their interests were safe in my hands and that my one pur- 
pose was to be their sympathetic medium in wrenching 
Charleston away from her reactionay masters. But those 
of aristocratic pretensions whose sympathies were never 
with my ''following", whose only hope was to DESTROY 
my following, which consisted, not of the evil forces of the 
community, as they affected to believe, but of the produc- 
ing forces, deliberately blinded the eyes of many of that 
following, and prevailed upon them through prejudice to 
vote with those who despise them. Alas for the blindness 
of prejudice. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review xxvii 

THE PENDULUM WILL SWING BACK. 

But I am not dismayed. The pendulum will swing back. 
The people have had a taste of progress and of good gov- 
ernment and will want more when the spell is broken. The 
people will turn again to those friends who have shown fel- 
lowship for them and will turn sharply away from their old 
enemy, the ''aristocracy", which fooled and used them for 
one day by smearing their faces with the smoot of the 
workingman. 

THE SPIRIT OF ISOLATION. 

The spirit or our rulers after the Civil War was isolation. 
They wanted no contact with the outside world. In the 
past we had been pioneers in railroad building, striving to 
grow by communication. The leaders of Charleston after 
the War complacently allowed the very railroads we had 
built to pass out of our hands and be used against our citv. 
After this, until twelve years ago not one new rail was laid 
into Charleston. The Seaboard and the Clinchfield Rail- 
roads had owned property here for years, but they were left 
to find their way here or were met by obstacles. Certainly 
nothing heroic was done to bring them in. Whatever rise 
in value and whatever increasing prosperity attended the 
years 1912-13-14-15, which will be fairly admitted as the 
beginning of our real estate improvement, came entirely 
by virtue of the advent of the Seaboard and the contracts 
of the Clinchfield to come, to induce which we went out 
and bought a right of way for seven miles into the city and 
gave it to them. 

WAR PROSPERITY ILLUSORY. 

The War prosperity which we afterwards enjoyed was 
wholly illusory. It rested on destruction, for which we and 
the world must still pay. Its temptations twisted the morals 
and aroused the cupidity of some of our people, so much so 
that twenty million dollars gathered in Liberty Bonds were 



xxviii Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

allowed to be wasted in terminals ten miles from the heart 
of the city, but at a place close to the hearts of some of our 
leading citizens. This deed will stand like a monument as 
proof of what has been my lifelong charge, that when our 
"best citizens" have had to choose between their own it cr- 
ests and those of our city, the poor old city has been the suf- 
ferer. 

Having in the four years of our previous administration 
by the advent of railroads and coal terminals put into the 
city the first touch of real prosperity it had known in our 
generation, our adversaries camped jealously on our heels 
until they put us out by fire and sword. The quality of 
their opposition is shown by the means employed. When 
had it ever previously occurred that in order to rid a city 
of good government the combined powers, including the 
Militia of the State, must be concentrated upon it? 

FOUR YEARS OUT OF POWER. 

And so, going out in 1915 after four years of construc- 
tion, we left every department in the highest efficiency and 
the treasury on a sound basis. We were followed by tour 
years of utter chaos. In 1919 when we came back into 
power the wreckers had left fingerprints on every dev trt- 
ment. The City was stripped to the bone. Even the patrol 
wagon was useless because the tires had been stolen. The 
City Hospital could buy neither medicine for the dying nor 
food for the convalescent. The streets were filthy. The 
City as a machine was running on one cylinder. 

OUR FINANCES SOUND. 

According to the statements of the City Treasurer touch- 
ing the various departments for the current year, we are 
leaving the finances of the City substantially on an even bal- 
ance. This, however, cannot be determined with exact- 
ness until the end of the year and until the various depart- 
ments have rendered a full accounting. 

It has been necessary for us to borrow large sums of 



Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv xxlx 

money against unpaid taxes. In due time these taxes when 
collected will liquidate current lia1)ilities. Our alternative 
was the sale of the property of the people fqr delinquent 
taxes, which, notwithstanding we have threatened from 
time to time, I have not been able to bring my heart to do. 
Because of the enormous increase of State and County 
Taxes, out of all proportion to the increase of City Taxes, 
and because of the very heavy burden of visible and invisi- 
ble Federal Taxes, the people are literally groaning under a 
yoke of taxes. 

Whatever increase in City Taxes was imposed by us 
was principally to bring up to par the bankruptcy of the 
departments as we inherited them from the previous admin- 
istration. That administration had not imposed taxes in 
rates anything like enough to meet the current needs of 
these departments. While on the face of the books it left 
the City finances about upon an even balance, there were, 
on the other hand, huge concealed deficits in the depleted 
physical administrative condition of the City. This deple- 
tion of supplies, equipment and the necessitiees of govern- 
ment had brought administration almost to a standstill. 

Deficits in government may not always appear in bank 
balances ; they may far more embarrassingly exist in admin- 
istrative bankruptcy. A.nd this was the condition we inherit- 
ed in the highest degree. And so likewise, while we in- 
herited this below-par condition of the City government 
(although financially the treasury was about at par) we are 
now bequeathing a treasury about at par, but a City adminis- 
tration far above par in every administrative division, mak- 
ing it unnecessary for our successors to maintain the rate 
of taxes which we had to impose to repair the depletion of 
the departments. Logically, therefore, there should follow 
during the next four years a substantial reduction in taxa- 
tion. 

OUR RETURN AFTER FOUR YEARS. 

This administration was therefore confronted by the 
poverty of the departments and the crying need for their 
relief. Even the police alarm boxes were out of commis- 



XXX Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

sion. One gallant officer had lost his life because in his 
desperation for help he could only ring the fire alarm. He 
had no way of calling for police help. When the engines 
found the "fire", it was his corpse. Such was the fruit of 
the ''business administration" which had fraudulently ous- 
ted us from power. We have completely renovated and 
brought to efficiency the Police Department under the direc- 
tion of a chief whose work in handling criminals is famous. 
I have no reason to believe that the promised police com- 
mission will improve the department, and it will be quite 
interesting to scrutinize the "non-partisan" commissioners 
appointed to "take it out of politics". 

We motorized the fire departmicnt in nearly every unit, 
and placed it in the highest state of efficiency. We have es- 
tablished the two-platoon system and raised the pay of the 
rank and file to a living wage. The two-platoon system 
required some increase in personnel, but the men are now 
allowed to live at home, companions of their families, where 
as under the old system they lived in the engine houses and 
merely visited them. 

It is hard to express the vast improvement which we have 
accomplished in our street department. This department 
was in a most wretched condition when we took it over. 
The live-stock, the rolling-stock and the equipment were 
near the zone point of depreciation. 

THE PAVING PROGRAM. 

We had in our previous administration put through the 
abutting owTiers lav/, under which the v/hole program of 
paving the city was begun and partly carried through, l.»i:t 
the law w^as in such form that the general taxpayer still 
paid one-quarter the cost. An abortive attempt to change 
this law was made while we were out of power to throw the 
entire cost upon the owner. But this attempt only compli- 
cated the law. The new law was unconstitutional. We had 
to go all through the process of submitting a constitutional 
amendment, before we were able to begin our program, 
which is now in progress of paving the whole city. When 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reznew xxxi 

our successors finish that part of it for which we have 
already let contracts, incidentally at far lower prices than 
anywhere in the United States, there will be little further 
in street improvement to do. W can then say at last vliat 
Charleston is a paved city. 

DRAINS AND SEWERAGE. 

Preparatory to this was the need for drains and sewerage. 
Meeting Street from Calhoun North was more than half the 
time an abyss. Traffic was often abandoned for months 
We laid a reinforced concrete drain and completed the 
smooth paving on this, the main traffic artery from the 
Battery to the boundary. Likewise Calhoun Street, which 
was the main crosstown artery. The drain-work alone on 
these two improvements cost approximately a quarter mil- 
lion dollars. It was paid, as was all other drain work above 
the twelve inch measurement, out of tax levies. A law 
case involving the right to charge retroactively for drain 
work was decided against the City by the Supreme Court, 
although our law was copied from other jurisdictions in 
which the precise principle was decided the other w^ay. 
This decision threw an unexpected burden upon the general 
taxpayer and somewhat embarrassed us in our work, wh ich, 
however, we soon overcame. 

Previous administrations had issued bonds for laying 
sewerage in possibly one-half the city. For years before 
that, however, that part of the city south of Broad Street 
had been sewered. As sewerage is the basis of sanitation 
and as sanitation is in turn the basis of health and even life, 
it is hard to conceive except under the old Charleston con- 
ception of privileged classes how any city government could 
confine its regard for public health to favored sections. 
When we began our city-wide paving program we dis- 
covered in whole sections the underground work of sewer- 
age was yet to be done. To meet this, we had to submit 
a bond issue of Five Hundred Thousand Dollars, under 
which this work has gone forward and we are now about 



xxxii Mayor Grace's Anmtal Review 

to give to every householder within the corporate limits that 
to which all are equally entitled — public health. 

VARIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Space will not permit us to give a catalogue of the various 
activities throughout the departments : the Orphan Houses, 
the Alms Houses, the playgrounds, the welfare work, the 
lighting, the Parks and pleasure-grounds, and the many 
others, in all of which we have left, we hope, the indelible 
impress of generous progress and efficiency. Our pride is 
that in all these things there has been nothing little-minded. 

Nor has our work been purely internal. We have co- 
operated most heartily with the National and State Govern- 
ments. Witness the work we have done to help the Navy 
Yard by contact with both houses of Congress and at the 
White House, where we received from the lips of our lamen- 
ted President himself assurance that the Yard would be 
saved. Witness the effective efforts we put forth to en- 
courage the use of Charleston as a torpedo base; recall 
the harbor dotted with destroyers and the streets, the stores, 
the homes and the hotels of the city filled for months with 
thousands of officers and men. True hospitality keeps no 
books. It was a pleasure to invite these guests and to 
mingle officially and personally with them, and to provide 
in the midst of so many problems of city government for 
their unbroken entertainment. There is but one satisfaction 
in this, the knowledge that Charleston did her part, and 
one sufficient compensation, friendships formed that will 
last always. 

And likewise we cooperated with the State government. 
We invited the Legislature and royally entertained it. 
When the meeting of the Governors of all States was held 
here we gave consideration to their well being and they went 
away blessing our people. Nor did we fail to cooperate 
with those activities in our midst which were not a part of 
the city government. The Commissioners of Public Works, 
who manage the municipal water-works which previously 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv xxxiii 

we had fought to estabhsh, can testify if they will how in 
all matters we rendered assistance. 

The Freight Bureau, which has done so much for the 
prevention and correction of rate discrimination was helped 
generously. We participated in many rate hearings, testi- 
fied to facts and presented briefs for the city. We attended 
the hearing in the Clinchfield Consolidation, and feel sure 
that in the testimony given and the briefs filed we con- 
tributed to the beneficial modification of the decree. 

We estblished and provided liberally for the Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce under the Chamber of 
Commerce and brought here Dr. Roy S. McElwee, that he 
might be able to restore our vanished commerce. This was 
an expense of many thousands, but we were glad to risk it 
upon one whose reputation was so high. We hope that 
those who spoke dismally of him will be disappointed. If 
they are right, however; if he cannot aid in bringing back 
our commerce, we have at least tried. 

When the Chamber of Commerce was itself upon the 
rocks, and with absolutely no claim upon me to throw out 
a life line, that body having been always as a whole the 
bitter enemy of my policies, I turned to its rescue at the 
earnest prayer of friends and did what I could to save it 
from dissolution. Let me now publicly thank its leaders 
for their grateful appreciation. 

One thing we have needed — a tourist hotel, on the Bat- 
tery. For half a century our newspapers had been building 
a Battery hotel nearly every year on their front pages. 
Meantime, Florida had become the tourist winterground. 
With one tourist hotel ye.ars ago on the Battery and not in 
the newspapers, others and still others would have followed 
and we and not Jacksonville would by now be the southern 
gateway. It is hard to exaggerate the changes in our des- 
tiny that timely action in this would have meant. But it 
is never too late. We gave the site for a tourist hotel under 
guarantee of its construction, and when the validity of the 
act was doubted by some progressive citizens we defended 
and won the case before the Supreme Court. And now 
it is built. 



xxxiv Mayor Grace's Anmuil Revie^v 

Likewise when the completion of the Francis Marion 
Hotel w^as in jeopardy, through the newly reorganized 
Chamber of Commerce we threw our whole heart into 
that successful fight and the hotel is finished. 

I have faith in the Santee-Cooper canal. It will give us 
a direct water route to Columbia for barge and steamer 
traffic. It will bring to our doors an inexhaustible supply 
of fresh water for unlimited industrial use. But above 
all, as I am led to believe, it will give Charleston the bene- 
fits of the largest Hydro Electric development south of 
Niagara and east of Muscle Shoals. I have worked with un- 
flagging hope for this project during the past four years. 

COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION 

Having stood always for good streets, it has been also 
my policy to encourage the building of roads and bridges 
to and from our city. The old "New Bridge" was a dis- 
grace to our city. Considering it was the only route but 
one out of the city, and that it led to that tourist's mecca, 
Florida, it was a standing advertisement of our spirit that 
travelers had to pay to cross it. Years ago I advocated that 
it be made free, and when this was at last the case, I went 
in with the Sanitary and Drainage Commission by levying 
a five mill tax for the city's part in a beautiful free bridge 
to take its place. I rejoice that the work on the structure 
has already begun. 

Civilization is based upon communication. Christianity 
has depended upon it. Commanded as the Apostles v/ere 
to spread the Gospel, they could not have done so but that 
men found ways even in those days to carry the Message 
on land and sea. The city which became the center of 
Christian thought owed it to the roads that led to it. We 
can do nothing unless we hold converse with our fellow man. 

But of all species of communication, that which is greatest 
is in the realm of learning. Nothing can equal the value 
of education. And so it is the acknowledged duty of the 
State to provide education for its sons, to COMMUNI- 
CATE to them those things which make for citizenship. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review xxxv 

Acting in eager sympathy with the High School Board and 
the Trustees of the College it has been our good fortune 
to have made education in Charleston at last absolutely 
free. Whatever other monuments we leave it must always 
be said that this administration made it simple for any 
boy or girl to be educated from the kindergarten through 
the College of Charleston. Moreover, we have cooperated 
in opening up this college in many useful ways to students 
at night, thus giving its benefits to those heretofore denied 
them. 

My one regret is that because of so many other absorbing 
duties I have not been able to complete my purpose of 
building and equipping a public library, although much 
ground in public sentiment has been broken for this, the 
only remaining educational facility unprovided. Like the 
old bridge over which the public had to pay to walk, the 
present library which the people have to pay to use is an 
anachronism in our democratic age. There should be no 
shrine in which the lamp of literature burns only for the 
chosen few. 

THE WATERFRONT REDEEMED. 

These various activities of our administration, which I 
have emphasized, have had as their central motive the 
conception that Charleston was destined by nature for 
greatness through her climate, her geography, and the 
quality of her people, sprung from every virile race of 
Europe; that she has been cheated of that greatness be- 
cause from her foundation her dominant principle of gov- 
ernment was aristocratic ; that this principle, especially 
since the Civil War, has tended to isolate her from Amer- 
ican democratic progress and increasingly curtailed the 
liberalism of her social life. Thus shrunken and isolated, 
it was not unnatural that she finally surrendered the one 
thing which gave her reason to exist — her waterfront — 
and in this moment of despair gave away her birthright. 
Having, therefore, proceeded in all directions on the idea 
of the restoration of communication, one thing remained 



xxxvi Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

for us to do, and upon the solemn promise to accomplish it, 
we were elected. 

Currying favor, as of old, with those who are strong 
our opponents promised to renew the surrender of our 
waterfront "under conditions". What those conditions 
were which were to justify the renewal of our bondage, the 
people never knew. Evidently they did not care, for they 
swept us into power while our opponents were seeking to 
explain. Why our opponents connived at the spending 
of Twenty Million Dollars at North Charleston while at the 
very time they were planning to give over, in perpetuity, 
the waterfront of our own dear city, upon which in days 
gone by the very settlement of our city had rested, w e 
cannot fathom. What else, indeed, was the reason for our 
settlement if not our waterfront? This was the first 
link in all the far-flung line of communication which 
made Charleston once a household word. What 
"patriotism" it was on the part of those who were again 
willing to give it away ! 

Our election was a covenant with the people to redeem 
that waterfront. Hence when the franchise expired we re- 
fused to renew^ it. But we had no intention to confiscate 
private property owned by the railroads or to depress its 
value. Our attitude was to meet them in fair negotiation 
and arrive if possible at amicable figures. After some pre- 
liminaries we agreed upon a reasonable price. But, under 
the law this agreement required confirmation by the people. 
In spite of the action of those who honestly and some who 
factionally opposed it, in spite of the tricks of politics em- 
ployed by unscrupulous politicians and malcontents, the 
people spoke their approval. 

THE WATERFRONT A SUCCESS. 

The jeremiads of our opponents, in which they lamented 
the prospect and predicted certain failure, met with ridicule 
by the people, and from the day the Port Utilities was or- 
ganized, the project until now has been a conspicuous 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv xxxvii 

business success. In spite of the systematic effort of its 
opponents to depress the credit of the city by their wails 
of overtaxation we sold our 4^/2 bonds practically at par, 
this too when one of our neighboring flourishing cities was 
selling a similar issue at considerable discount. In the gross 
ultimate cost of the money we borrowed, as against that 
of our sister city, we will save One Million Dollars for our 
taxpayers in comparison. 

We were fortunate indeed in the personnel of the non- 
partisan commission chosen to operate this enterprise. Thus 
far politics has been carefully excluded from its affairs. 
Even under the greatest campaign pressure, when it was re- 
ported to me that men holding key positions were against 
me, although their bread and butter came from an institu- 
tion which I had done so much to establish, and that they 
were actually using those positions to control votes, I re- 
fused to complain to the Commission. Politics played even 
against me did not justify me in raising a political objection. 

PUBLIC OWNERSHIP A NECESSITY 

«» 

So much has been said about the waterfront and its ef- 
fect upon our welfare that the subject may seen threadbare. 
But I cannot close these last official words without renew- 
ing, as it were, my vows and confirming my faith in the 
scheme of public ownership. 

All government is in part the restraint of private action. 
The ideal state is one of absolute freedom of the individual. 
If men had just regard for the rights of others, govern- 
ment itself would be quite unnecessary. Government, how- 
ever, from the beginning has been found necessary because 
men cannot be trusted to deal fairly with one another. From 
the days of Cain, man has refused to be his brother's keeper. 

Modern government is designed to deal not only with 
personal wrongs done by man to man but with intricate com- 
munity injuries. Theoretically, under interstate commerce 
and state railway comissions each community as well as each 



xxxviii Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 

man is entitled through government to equality before the 
law. It is still, however, the function of communities, as 
of men, to advance their own welfare and to fall back upon 
government only when met with wrongful interference. 
It is not the function of transportation corporations to do 
more than give equal service to and from seaports; it is 
NOT their function to provide terminals at them. The 
City of Charleston has nothing to sell but its gateway to 
the sea. Transportation companies bought that gateway 
on the bargain counter and kept it closed by years of dis- 
criminatory neglect. The duty of opening it again was 
ours ; the duty of keeping it open is ours. It is a duty that 
must never again be delegated to others. It is also a 
treasure that cannot be trusted to the keeping of covetous 
strangers. 

Let us be thankful that it was this administration which 
rescued that waterfront from the hands of strangers, and 
let us be doubly thankful that we have proved to those 
who follow us that Public Ownership is a success. We 
are proud of that success and shall watch the future with a 
jealous, perhaps a suspicious eye, for already^ we. fear we 
see the plans of the enemy afoot. 

And now, my dear comrades, I bid you farewell. 

JOHN P. GRACE 
December 11th 1923. 



I N D EX 



ANNUAL REPORT OF OFFICERS AND COM- 
MISSIONS OF THE CITY OF 
CHARLESTON. 



Page 

CITY GOVERNMENT iii 

CITY TREASURER 1 

ASSESSING DIVISION 22 

TRAFFIC BUREAU 23 

PORT UTILITIES COMMISSION 28 

FOREIGN TRADE AND PORT DEVELOPMENT 29 

CORPORATION COUNSEL - 35 

CITY ENGINEER— 

(a) To THE Mayor and City Council Zl 

(City Engineer's Report Proper) 

(b) To THE Committee on Streets „ 38 

(Street Department Report) 

Sewerage Department 50 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH— 

(a) Health Officer ~ 59 

(b) City Bacteriologist 63 

(c) Food Inspector \ 64 

(d) Chief Sanitary Inspector 66 

(f) Mortuary Statistics 70 

(h) Meteorological Statistics 80 

WATER DEPARTMENT 82 

CITY ABATTOIR 110 

BUILDING INSPECTOR _ Ill 

CITY ELECTRICIAN— 

(a) Report on Lighting the City 114 

(b) Report of Electrical Work 64 

METER INSPECTION _ 116 

INSPECTOR OF PLUMBING 117 

CHIEF OF POLICE- 118 

BOARD OF FIRE MASTERS 121 

BOARD OF MARKET COMMISSIONERS 137 

PARK COMMISSIONERS— 

( a) Chairman 138 

(b) Supervisor of Parks 140 

( c ) Secretary 144 

MUNICIPAL PLAYGROUND COMMISSIONERS— _ 146 

COLONIAL COMMON AND ASHLEY RIVER EMBANK- 
MENT 155 

MARION SQUARE 156 



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Mayor Grace's Annual Review 11 

PUBLIC DEBT, DECEMBER 31. 1923. 

Issue 4% Funding Bonds due 1937..: $1,850,000.00 

Issue 4% Funding Bonds due _ 1938 1,500,000.00 

$3,350,000.00 

Issue 4% Sewer Bonds 1927 _ 263,000.00 

Issue 4%% Funding Bonds due April 1928... $ 90,000.00 

Issue A'Vi% Funding Bonds due October ...1928 ._ 10,000.00 



100,000.00 



Issue 5% Funding Bonds due ....1924 $ 62,500.00 

Issue 5% Funding Bonds due ..1925 90,000.00 

Issue 5% Funding Bonds due 1926... 55,000.00 

207,500.00 

Issue 4%% Water Bonds due 1957 1,447,000.00 

Issue 4%% Port Utilities Bonds due ....1962. 2,500,000.00 

Issue 4% Severage Bonds due.... 1963 500,000.00 

Issue 5% Stock, College of Charleston 23,000.00 



$8,390,500.00 



NOTE :— 

$ 263,000.00 Sewer Bonds paid from 1 Mill Tax. 
1,447,000.00 Paid by Board of Public Works from Receipts. 
2,500,000.00 Paid by Port Utilities from Receipts. 

50,000.00 Sewer Bonds Paid from Levy. 
3,680,500.00 Paid by Appropriation. 

Series A — Abutment Street Paving Bonds 6% $ 183,000.00 

Series B — Abutment Street Paving Bonds 5% 257,000.00 

Series C— Abutment Street Paving Bonds 5%- - 375,000.00 

Abutment Bonds paid from receipts, and they mature serially, same are not 
carried on Public Debt Ledger. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS, POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND, 
JANUARY 1, 1923 TO DECEMBER 31, 1923. 

RECEIPTS : 

To Balance from last statement: 





$ 


57,102.53 
500.00 








$57,602.53 








Fines and Forfetiures on Pay Roll 

Interest Account: 

Interest on Deposit 


....$ 


782.71 
2,984.34 


3.767.05 








Permanent Fund: 

Fines and Forfeitures on Pay Roll... 

5% Fines, Recorders Court 

Donation Account: 
V. C C. Co. 


-$ 


1,565.66 
679.85 

300.00 


2.545.51 








EXPENDITURES : 

Aged and Decrepit Fund: 

E. F. Beattie 


$ 


799.92 

679.92 

1,146.00 

618.00 


$63,915.09 


Wm. H. Charlon.. 

Mrs. P. Buck... 

Mrs. E. Duffy 


8.248.84 


Balance - - 






60,671.25 




$ 


60,671.25 




Balance Sheet, Dec. 31, 1924: 

Cash 


$63,915.09 


Permanent Fund 

Aged and Decrepit Fund 


$ 


$ 60.171.25 
500.00 




60,671.25 


$ 60.671.25 



Examined and Found Correct: 
JULIUS H. JAHNZ, 

Chairman, Committee. 



12 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcznczv 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES FIREMENS' INSURANCE AND INSPECTION FUND. 
JANUARY 1.. 1923 TO DECEMBER 31, 1923. 

RECEIPTS : 

Balance from last Annual Statement: 

Pension Fund , $ 58,714.24 

Disabled and Superannuated Fund _ 600.00 



$ 59,214.24 
3,159.49 



Fines Pay Roll _ _ 86.00 

Interest on Deposit _ 3,073.49 

Pension Fund: 

Premiums from Fire Insurance Cos $ 4,227.71 

Broker Fee from Compt. Gen.,... _ 1.80 

1% Assessment 1,357.11 

5,586.62 

Donations 430.00 



$68,390.35 



EXPENDITURES : 

Pension Fund : 

Pension to A. Myers $ 973.56 

Pension to T. W. Halsall , 519.75 

Premium City Treas. Bond 125.00 

Printing By-Laws 20.00 

5% on $4,227.71 to State Firemen 211.38 



$ 1,849.69 



Disabled and Superannuated Fund : 

Funeral Expense T .E. Watson _ .$ 100.00 

Funeral Expense B. E. Bicaise. 100.00 

200.00 

Balance 66,340.66 



$68,390.35 



Funds have to their Credit, December 31, 1923: 

Pension Fund _ .$65,410.66 

Disabled and Superannuated Fund. 500.00 

Donation Fund 430.00 



$66,340.66 



Examined and found correct: 

JOHN H. STEENKEN, 
LOUIS BEHRENS, 

Committee. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY TREASURER FOR THE 

COMMISSIONERS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING JUNE 30th, 1923. 

RECEIPTS 

Balance from last Statement $ 89,923.88 

County Treasurer 3 Mill Tax 59,465.62 

Poll Tax-... - 6.885.69 

Dog Tax - 404.91 

Marriage License 447.25 

Game Warden 1,122.70 

State Department of Education ...- 10,801.50 

County Superintendent 1,000.00 

City Council 1,000.00 

City Taxes 1917. -- - 16.25 

C ity Taxes 1919 — 27.23 

City Taxes 1920... _.. 3,564.33 

City Taxes 1921 _.. 18,566.11 

City Taxes 1922 .» -— 271,374.63 

City Taxes 1923 . 54,293.42 

$518,893.42 



Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv 13 

EXPENDITURES 

Geo. C. Rogers Asst. Clerk— $374,659.98 

Refund on Taxes.— _... '255!95 

Commissioners Sinking Fund _.. 26,379!33 

Teachers Retirement Fund ._ .Z.-^^Z''''Z'^^'. 2!o02.14 

County Treasurer '25o!oO 

Balance 115,346.12 



$618,893.42 

SINKING FUND, COMMISSIONERS PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

RECEIPTS 

Balance from last Statement _.. $ 7,986.45 

1% Mill Tax- 26,879.33 

Interest on Deposit. .^ _ _ 387.68 

Interest on Liberty Bonds... 552.50 

Interest on State Bonds 600.00 



$35,905.96 



EXPENDITURES . 

Geo. C. Rogers, Asst. Clerk for Coupons $17,500.00 

Geo. C. Rogers, Asst. Clerk for Expense. 61.26 

Purchase on S. C. State Bonds... 9,903.89 

Balance 8,440.81 



$35,905.96 



ACCOUNT OF THE CLERK OF THE BOARD 

GENERAL ACCOUNT 

RECEIPTS 

Balance, July 1, 1922 -.- $ 5,803.14* 

From City Treasurer, on Warrants of Chairman or 

Vice-chairman 374,659.98 

Tuition Fees 500.63 

Rent, Tract of Land, Burke Industrial School 117.00 

From Sales .-.. _ 978.00 

Return Premiums, Cancelled Tornado Policies 55.39 

Textbooks Lost or Defaced 245.17 

Refund Y. M. C. A., Hauling 2.50 

Fines, Defacement School Property .91 

Balance Unexpended, Appropriation Current Expenses 

Burke Industrial School -.... 86.57 

Amount Received from Sales in various Departments, 

Burke Industrial School ..- 39.26 

Sales Articles Made in Woodworking Department, White 

Elementary Schools 52.74 

Sale Articles Made, Vocational School 90.83 

Sale Drawing Paper, Vocational School 8.56 



— $382,640.68 
Also, Received from City Treasurer, as Treasurer, Teachers' 

Retirment Fund and Placed to Credit of that Fund 2,002.14 



$384,642.82 



♦This Balance includes Face of Note Cancelled and to be re-invested ($100.00) 
and Accumulated Interest ($21.00 Brought from Special Account). Agricul- 
tural Prizes, Colored (Burke) Industrial School. 

ACCOUNT OF THE CLERK OF THE BOARD 

GENERAL ACCOUNT 

EXPENDITURES 
(Showing certain special accounts kept during the year) 

Salaries - $282,836.37 

Repairs on School Property* — 8,635.84 

School Furniture and Apparatus, Repairs and Replacements 1,119.78 



14 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

School Furniture and Apparatus, New _ K ??7 IR 

Furniture, Remodeled Bennett School ~ " 8 00 

Furniture, Remodeled Simon ton School ~ c'oq 

Fuel and Incidentals ""' ■"■ « orro oi 

School Supplies _... _ - - - o'^rl^t 

Schoolhouse Sites ------^-ZZZIZZZZ'Z" " ~'~ 262 77 

Building Schoolhouses, Rem. Bennett School. . 4 nr/eo 

Building Schoolhouses. 1st Addition, Jas. Simons School ""Z""!' 5'934"86 

Books for Libraries _ _ ' qi'io 

Other Purposes** .....ZZZ"" "'ZZ Z " 31782 60 

Temporary Quarters, Bennett School _ _ Z l'l93 81 

Building Schoolhouses, Rem. Simonton Sch... . 8*005 03 

Free Text Books. ......ZZZZZZ::Z 5:552:23 

Medical Inspection* „ _ 5 g^S 42 

Compulsory Attendance* .] [] ]^ 1*859 26 

Expenses Bond Issue 1923 \ 1" 1" 117 10 



Total „ *** $373,332.72 

♦Includes Salaries Special Employees. 
Incorporated in Teachers' Retirement Fund, Amount Received from 

City Treasurer 2,002.14 



$375,334.86 



**In this Exhibit, in the Account Other Purposes is entered the special 
appropriation of $4,659.98 made by the City Board of School Commissioners to 
cover the deficit in the income of the Teachers' Retirement Fund. In this Account, 
also is carried the $16,000.00 paid to the Trustees of the High School of 
Charleston. 



'♦Current Expenditures $349,655.91 

Outlays, Sites, Building Equipment 23,559.71 

Expenses Bond Issue 1923 117.10 



$373,332.86 



ACCOUNT OF THE CLERK OF THE BOARD 

GENERAL ACCOUNT 

SUMMARY 

Receipts $ 382.640.68 

Expenditures _ „ $373,332.72 

As Treasurer Teacher' Retirement Fund, received and 

incorporated in that Fund 2,002.14 2,002.14 



$375,334.86 $384,642.82 
Balance, July 1, 1923 9,307.96 



MITCHELL MEDAL ACCOUNT 
Interest on Bond: 

Receipts $ 12.87 

Expenditure $ 12.00 

Balance, July 1, 1923 .17 



ACCOUNT OF THE CLERK OF THE BOARD 

BOND ACCOUNT 

RECEIPTS 

Proceeds Bond ssue 1922 $209,998.67 

Interest on Deposit. _ 3,151.22 

Gift toward Vocational School _ 90,000.00 



Total $303,144.89 

EXPENDITURES 

Expenses Bond Issue 1922 „ _ $ 500.00 

Bennett School, Remodeling and Furniture 44,967.26 

Simonton School, Remodeling and Furnitui-e — 70,686.11 

James Simons School, Addition to Site ..._ _ - .$ 9,281.84 

1st Addition, Building and Furniture 8,011.03 

2nd Addition, Building and Furniture 1,762.03 19,054.90 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 15 

Vocational School, Site $ 67.50 

Vocational School, Building and Equipment 151,673.37 151.740.87 

Memminger School, Fireproof Stairs 314.38 

Administration Building, Site 3,805.00 

Craft School, Addition to Site $ 2,841.20 

Craft School Fireproof Stairs 302.18 3,143.38 

Julian Mitchell School, Heating Plant and Fireproof Stairs 761.72 
Burke Industrial School, Remodeling Main Building, Annex 

and Heating Plant 6,248.52 

Total $301,222.14 

Balance, July 1, 1923 1,922.75 



$303,144.89 



BOND ISSUE INTEREST ACCOUNT 

RECEIPTS 

From City Treasurer, Sinking Fund Account, on Warrant of Chair- 
man (Issue 1919) $12,543.76 

From City Treasurer, Sinking Fund Account, on Warrant of Chair- 
man (Issue 1922) 5,017.50 



Total _ $17,561.26 

EXPENDITURES 

To meet interest on Bonds, (Issue 1919) $ 12,500.00 

Exchange on checks and charges of Bank for handling 

coupons, (Issue 1919) .. 43.76 $12,543.76 



To meet Interest on Bonds, (Issue 1922) semi-annual, $ 5,000.00 

Evchange on check and charge of Bank for handling 

coupons, (Issue 1922) 17.50 5,017.50 



Total $17,561.26 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS 

The bonded indebtedness of the School District comprisins th« City of 
Charleston on July 1, 1923, was as follows: 

Amount of Bonds Rate of Interest Semi-Annual Bonds Mature 

Interest Payable 



July 15th 

$250,000.00 5% & July 15. 1944 

Jan. 15th 

July 15th 

$200,000.00 5% & July 15, 1947 

Jan. 15th 



The following is a Summary of the total receipts and expenditures, derived 
by combining the account of the City Treasurer and the accounts of the Clerk 
of the Board. This particular form of report is that required by the State 
Superintendent of Education in the Annual Report of his office. 

SUMMARY 

CHARLESTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 1922-1923 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 

Cash balance on hand from all sources, July 1, 1922: 

City Treasurer, General Account $89,923.88 

Clerk of the Board, General Account 5,803.14 $95,727,02 

Poll Tax 6,885.69 

Three-Mill Constitutional Tax 59,465.62 

Dog Tax 404.91 

Game Warden 1,122.70 



16 



Mayor Grace s Annual Review 



Marriage Licenses _ 

Special Local Tax from City Treas.'($347;84i:97"Tess "refund $255."95 j .." 

District Tax for Bonds (Interest and Sinking Fund) 

t.xtra County Aid _ „ _ 

Extra State Aid, ( V 

Federal Aid. ($10,801.50 less refund of $250.00 to County Treas. { 

Tuition _ j^ 

Rents, Sales, Refunds— -^- -Z3~//J////.!.///.. . ~J 

Bond Issue During the Year I ZZ _ ""^~ 

Refund, Free Text Books... J "".[..[..... _ L „ '~ 

City Council for Interest _. Z~ - '1 1 

Interest on Funds in Bank.- 

Gift 



Total 



447.25 

321,206.69 

26,379.33 

1.000.00 

7,595.50 

2,956.00 

500.63 

1,431.76 

209,993.67 

245.17 

1,000.00 

3,151.22 

90,000.00 

-$829,513. 16* 



'Excluding Mitchell Medal Account. 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
White 



Administrative, excluding Superintendent— $ 2,761.82 

Teachers' Salaries (Men).. 32,495.75 

Teachers' Salaries (Women) 171,380.05 

Furniture and Apparatus _ _ _. 14,970.15 

Fuel and Incidentals _ 15,168.35 

Repairs on School Property 6,728.86 

Expenses Bond Issue 1923 73.19 

Expenses Bond Issue 1922. 333.33 

Schoolhouso Sites 14,874.68 

Building Schoolhouses _ * 207,272.01 

Books for Library 86.74 

Interest on School Bonds, 1919 10,035.01 

Interest on School Bonds, 1922....: _ 3,345.00 

Redemption of School Bonds or Additions 

to Sinking Fund, 1919 6,005.90 

Redemption of School Bonds or Additions 

to Sinking Fund, 1922 873.79 

Teachers' Retirement Fund : 

Treasurer $2,002.14 

Clerk _ 4,659.98 



Free Text Books 

Medical Inspection 

Compulsory Attendance 
Other Purposes, * 

Total 



239.53 
529.02 
151.90 
115.56 
054.38 



Negro 

1,578.18 

9,673.33 

55,830.03 

8,389.00 

5,860.36 

3,100.79 

43.91 

166.67 

1,383.63 

78.512.16 

4.36 

2.508.75 

1,672.50 

1,501.48 

436.90 



2,422.59 
2,023.21 
2,521.52 
743.70 
3,068.24 



For Both 
Races 

$ 4.340.00 

42,169.08 

227,210.08 

23,359.15 

21.028.71 

9,829.65 

117.10 

500.00 

16,258.31 

285,784.17 

91.10 

12,543.76 

5.017.50 

7,507.38 

1,310.69 



6,662.12 
4,552.23 
5,673.42 
1,859.26 
27,122.62 



..-$521,495.02 $181,441.31 $702,936.33* 



♦Uiider the head of Other Purposes is entered the $16,000.00 paid to the Trustees 
of ^he High School of Charleston in accordance with the agreement between 
that Board and the City Board of School Commissioners. 

•♦Excluding Mitchell Medal Account. 

TOTAL RECEIPTS, TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND BALANCES 

Total Receipts $829.513.16« 

Total Expenditures $702,936.33* 

Balance. July 1, 1923 126,576.83* 



Statement of Balances: 

General Account, City Treasurer, July 1, 1923. 



General Account, Clerk of the Board, July 1, 1923. 
Bond Account, Clerk of the Board, July 1, 1923 



-$115,346.12 

- 9,307.96 

- 1,922.75 

$126,576.83 



NOTE 



Expenditures : 

1. Current 

2. Outlays 



-$ 23,559.71 
300,722.14 



?349,655.91 



224,281.85 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 



17 



Debt Service: 

Interest, Exchange and Bank Charges, Bond 

Coupons, 1919 $ 12,543.76 

Interest, Exchange and Bank Charges, Bond • 

Coupons, 1922 ..._. 5,017.50 

Incorporated in Sinking Fund, Balance remaining 

1% Mill Tax Collection 8,818.07 

26.379.33 

Expenses 1922 Bond Issue 500.00 

Expenses Preparation 1923 Bond Issue 117.10 

Incorporated in Teachers' Retirement Fund, Amount 

Received from City Treasurer 2,002.14 



$702,936.33* 



"Excluding Mitchell Medal Account. 



COMPILATION FROM ACCOUNTS HEREINBEFORE GIVEN 
CITY TREASURER 

Receipts: Expenditures: Balance: 

Balance, 

July 1, 1922 $89,923.88 Clerk Gen. Account....$374,659.98 

Various ordinary Teachers Retirement 

sources of income. Fund 2,004.14 

(excluding refunded 

$250.00 & $255.95) 402,084.36 Thru Sinking Fund 

for Interest on 

Bonds, Exchange 

and Ban^ Charges 

From 1% Mills Tax (1919 and 1922 Is- 

for Sinking Fund & sues) 17,561.26) 

Interest on Bonds ) 

(1919 and 1922)...... 26,379.33 Incorporated in Sink- ) 

ing Fund, balance ) 

1% Mills Tax Col- ) 

lection, (1919 and ) 

1922) 8,818.07) 



$518,387.57 



$403,041.45 



$115,346.12 



CLERK OF THE BOARD 
GENERAL ACCOUNT 

Receipts : Expenditures : 

Balance, 

July 1, 1922 $ 5,803.14 Total, Current and 

From City Treas 374,659.98 Outlays, Expenses 

Other Sources 2,177.56 Bond Issue 1923 .... $373,332.72 



Balance : 



$382,640.68 



$373,332.72 



$9,807.96 



CLERK OF THE BOARD 
BOND ACCOUNT 



Receipts : 

Proceeds Issue 1922._-_$209,993.67 
Interest on Deposit... 3,151.22 
Gift 90,000.00 



Expenditures : 

Outlays $300,722.14 

Expenses Issue 1922.. 500.00 



Balance : 



$303,144.89 



$301,222.14 



$1,922.75 



18 Mayor Grace's Annual Reinezv 

CLERK OF THE BOARD 

BOND ISSUE INTEREST ACCOUNT 

Receipts: Expenditures: Balance: 

From City Treasurer To meet Interest on 

Sinking Fund Ac- Bonds, Exchange & 

count, 1919 and Bank Charges: 

1922 $17,561.20 1919 Issue $ 12,543.76 

1922 Issue 5,017.50 



1. Income, City Board of School Commissioners, July 1, 1922 — July 1, 1923: 
City Treasurers* General Account $402,084.36 

A study of foregoing page shows the following: 

Income, City Board of School Commissioners, July 1, 1922 — July 1, 1923: 

City Treasurer, General Account .-,_ $402,084.36 

City Treasurer Sinking Fund Account...., - _ 26,379.33 

Clerk, General Account ._ 2,177.56 

Clerk, Bond Account: 

Proceeds Issue 1922, $209,993.67 

Interest on Deposit ._ 3,151.22 

Gift _ 90,000.00 



303,144.89 



TotaK $733,786.14 

2. Expenditures, City Board of School Commissioners, July 1, 1922 — July 1, 1923: 

City Treasurer, Teachers' Retirement Fund, Incorporated in 

that Fund $ 2,002.14 

City Treasurer, Thru SinkiAg Fund Account to Clerk, Expended 

for Interest on Bonds, Exchange and Bank Charges 17,561.26 

City Treasurer, Incorporated in Sinking Fund Account, Balance 
Remaining 1% Mills Tax Collection July 1, 1922 — July 1, 
1923 _-.... - .- _ 8,818.07 

Clerk, General Account 373,332.72 

Clerk, Bond Acocunt 301,222.14 

Total -. - $702,936.33 

3. Balance remaining. Fiscal Year : 

July 1, 1922 — July 1, 1923 $ 30,849.81 

To which should be added: 

Balance as of July 1, 1922, 

City Treasurer, General Account _ $89,923.88 

Clerk, General Account 5,803.14 95,727.02 



Total Balance, July 1, 1923 __ _ - -- $126,576.83 

City Treasurer, General Acocunt $115,346.12 

Clerk, General Account 9,307.96 

Clerk, Bond Account - -.-. 1,922.75 

. $126,576.13 

Note — The Sinking Fund Account is given in full on Page 2 of this Report. 
The Mithcell Medal Account, is not included in page 11 and 12. 

EXPENDITURES THRU JUNE 30, 1923 FOR: 

1. Remodeling and Refurnishing Bennett School: 

1921-22 _. ..- — $ 107.74 

1922-23 _ 49,090.86 

$ 49,198.60 



Remodeling and Refurnishing Simonton School: 

1921-22 - - $ 82.32 

1922-23 ...- - _.. - 78,697.43 



78,779.75 



Addition to James Simons School, and Furniture for 
same, (Complete) : 
1922-23 _...l ._ . ^-.,^,,.^- 13,946.89 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 19 

4. Vocational School, Building, Furniture, Equipment and 
Incidentals : 

1921-22 $ 28.57 

1922-23 -_ 151,740.87 

• 151,769.44 

During the fiscal year July 1, 1922 — July 1, 1923, the following school con- 
struction was authorized : A second additiion to the James Simons School ; the 
remodeling of the Burke Industrial School ; an Annex to the Burke Industrial 
School ; New heating plants in the Julian Mitchell and Burke Industrial Slhools ; 
Fireproof stairways in the Crafts, Memminger and Julian Mitcheil School ; An 
Administration Building for the School System. The expenditures for this work 
during the year ending June 30, 1923, will be found in the Bond Account, page 
6 of this report. 

During the Fiscal Year 1922-1923, the City Board of School Commissioners 
employed the following: 

One Superintenent, One Assistant Clerk of the Board, One Office Steno- 
grapher, One Superintendent's Secretary, One Superintendent of Repairs, One 
Supervisor of Special Classes, One Supervisor of Colored Schools, One Supervisor 
of Music, One Primary Supervisor, One Supervisor of Writing, One Compulsory 
Attendance O _ cer. Six White Principals, One Vice-Principal, One Special 
Teacher Manual Training, One Special Teacher Domestic Science and Arts, 
One Treasurer, Three School Medical Inspectors, Three School Nurses, One hun- 
dred and thirty-six White Wom.en Teachers, Six White Men Teachers, Tvi^o White 
Principals Evening Schools, Five Teachers (White) Evening Schools, One Director 
Vocational Evening Classes, Five Teachers Vocational Evening Classes, Four 
Negro Principals, Two Negro Vice-Principals, Seventy-Five Negro Women 
Teachers, One Negro Man Teacher, Eleven Janitors, Ten Janitors' Assistants. 



TRUSTEES ORPHAN HOUSE FUND AND ESTATE 

JANUARY 1, 1923 TO DECEMBER 31, 1923, 

RECEIPTS : 

To Balance Trustees $ 7,455.70 

W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund 14,818.26 $22,273.96 

To Trustees: 

12 Months Interest on $211,500.00 City 4% Bonds 

July 1923 and January 1924 Coupons 8,460.00 

18 Months Interest on $28,500.00 City 4% Bonds, 

Jan. 1923, July 1923 and Jan. 1924 Coupons 1,710.00 

1 Year's Interest on Deposit _ 435.23 

Interest on Liberty Bonds 1,530.00 

To W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund: 

1 yr. Interest on $98,000.00 City 4% Bonds $ 3,920.00 

1 yr. Interest on $10,000.00 4% Sewerage 400.00 

1 yr. Interest on $11,000.00 5% City of Columbia 550.00 

1 yr. Interest on Deposit 810.31 6,680.31 



$40,089.50 

EXPENDITURES : 
By Trustees : 

Paid over to City for Current Expense.. 10,170.00 

Paid over to City for Current Expense 435.23 

By W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund : 

Paid over to City for Current Expense 2,000.00 

By Balance Trustees ._ $ 8,985.70 

do W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund 18,498.57 27,484.27 



$40,089.50 



ASSETS ; 



Trustees Cash $ 8,985.70 

City of Charleston 4% Bonds 240,000.00 

Liberty Bonds 11.000.00 $259,985.70 



20 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviciv 



W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund: 

Cash $ 18.498.57 

City of Charleston 4% Bonds,.. 98,000.00 

City of Charleston 4% Sewerage Bonds 10,000.00 

City of Columbia 5% Bonds.. _ 11,000.00 

Liberty Bonds 25,000.00 $162,498.57 

Examined and found correct: 

WALTER PRINGLE. 
Chairman Charleston Orphan House and 
Trustee Orphan Funds and Estate. 



W. J. BENNETT MEMORIAL FUND. DECEMBER 31, 1923. 

1905 Bonds Purchased .....$ 2,000.00 

1906 Bonds Purchased _ _. 2.100.00 

1907 Bonds Purchased 2,200.00 

1908 Bonds Purchased _ 2.300.00 

1909 Bonds Purchased 1,000.00 

1911 Bonds Purchased 5,400.00 • 

1912 Bonds Purchased 1,500.00 

1913 Bonds Purchased „ 2.500.00 

1920 Bonds Purchased _ 25,000.00 

1923 Cash in Bank 18,498.57 

■ $ 62,498.57 

Original Donation 100,000.00 

$162,498.57 
Cash in Bank drawing 5% Daily Deposit. 



COMMISSIONERS SINKING FUND 

JAN. 1, 1923 TO DEC. 31, 1923. 

RECEIPTS : 

Balance from last Statement $ 7,253.41 

Interest Account: 

Interest on 4% City Bonds $ 40.00 

Interest on 4% Sewerage Bonds ._ 680.00 

Interest on Liberty Bond 212.50 



— 932.50 

Interest on Deposit 380.17 



$8,566.08 



ASSETS : 



Cash $ 8,566.08 

4% City Bonds ...._ 1,000.00 

4% Sewerage Bonds 17,000.00 

Liberty Bonds „ 5,000,00 



$31,566.08 



TRANSACTIONS OF SEWERAGE SINKING FUND FOR YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1923. 

RECEIPTS : 

To Balance from last Statement ...$ 2,390.28 

Spcecial Levy — 

1 Mill Tax -. 24,108.72 

Interest Account — 

Interest on Deposit _ .— 214.87 



$26,713.82 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 21 

EXPENDITURES : 

Coupon Account — 

Coupons Paid on Bonds ..$ 10,650.00 

Bond Account — - 

Bonds Purchased 6,896.89 

Balance .._ 9,166.93 



$26,713.82 



Balance Dec. 31, 1923- 



Sinking Fund $254,643.07 

Cash 9,166.93 

Coupon Account 810.00 

Bon d Account 268,000.00 



$263,810.00 $263,810.00 

Memorandum — 

Original Issue Bonds 1910.... _ $300,000.00 

Additional Issue Bonds 1911.... 75,000.00 

Additional Issue Bonds 1919 6,000.00 

Total Issue $381,000.00 

1910 Bonds Retired $ 6,000.00 

1911 Bonds Retired 7,000.00 

1914 Bonds Retired 10,000.00 

1916 Bonds Retired : 5,500.00 

1917 Bonds Retired 10,000.00 

1918 Bonds Retired _. 5,000.00 

1919 Bonds Retired.. .. 15,000.00 

1920 Bonds Retired ._ 7.000.00 

1922 Bonds Retired 45,500.00 

1923 Bonds Retired.. 7,000.00 118,000.00 



$263,000.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

W. S. SMITH, 

City Treasurer. 



22 Mayor trace's Annual Rcznezv 

ASSESSING DIVISION 



Charleston, S. C, April 15, 1924. 

Mr. IV . S. Smith, City Treasurer, 

Dear Sir : 

The following is a summary of the total assessed values 
of real estate and personal property returned for taxation, 
together with the amount of classified licenses issued 
through the Assessing Division of the Department of Fi- 
nance for the year 1923 : 

Real Estate - -..-$17,150,335.00 

Personal Property 8,252,804.00 

Total $25,403,139.00 

At 451/2 Mills $ 1,155,842.82 

As compared with the assessments for the year 1922 the 
following differences are shown : 

Real Estate, decrease $ 170,740.00 

Persona Property decrease.... 1,560,943.00 

Total decrease for 1923 as com- 
pared with 1922 $1,731,683.00 

The amount of regular applications issued 

for hcenses is.- $ 116,783.05 

The amount of licenses assessed is 5,383.75 

The amount of penalty assessed is 1,076.75 

As compared with the regular license issued for the 
year 1922 the decrease is $16,274.58. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN P. SULLIVAN, 

Chief Assessing Division, 
Department of finance. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 23 

CHARLESTON TRAFFIC BUREAU 



To the Honorable, the Mayor and City 
Council of Charleston, S. C. : 

It is a pleasure to transmit the report of activities of the 
Charleston Traffic Bureau for the period extending from 
January 1st, 1923, to December 31st, 1923. 

The report is of necessity in the merest outline and cannot 
describe the amount of time and labor involved in the ac- 
tivities reported upon. A resume of the detailed report will 
show that the Bureau has handled twelve cases before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission and three cases before 
the Railroad Commission of South Carolina involving the 
adjustment of freight rates from and to Charleston. Four 
of these cases have been decided by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission in our favor, and the other cases are now 
pending a decision. 

In addition to these cases, it will also be noted that num- 
erous rate adjustments have been handled with the carriers, 
and a large number of reductions in rates have been secured 
due to this handling. 

In conclusion, I wish to direct attention to the fact that 
the work which has been done by the Traffic Bureau in the 
past few years is of a highly constructive character and has 
proven of advantage to the shippers and receivers of freight 
located at Charleston. During the ensuing year it will be 
the purpose of this organization to continue in an aggressive 
way the work that has been started and endeavor to bring 
to a satisfactory conclusion the many important rate cases 
which are now pending before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

Yours very truly, 

THOS J. BURKE, 

Commissioner. 



The detailed report of the Charleston Traffic Bureau for 
the period January 1, 1923, to and including December 31, 
1923, is as follows: 



24 Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv 

Southern Class Rate Investigation — (Docket 13494) — The Traffic 
Bureau participated in the Interstate Commerce Commission's Gen- 
eral Investigation of Class Rates applying within the Southern Ter- 
ritory, also between the Southern Territory and the Central Freight 
Association Territory, Eastern and Interior Eastern Points and Vir- 
ginia Cities. Evidence was submitted at the various hearings setting 
forth the claims of Charleston for a readjustment of its rates. Briefs 
were filed on August 1st, and the case is now awaiting a decision by 
the Commission. This decision is expected the latter part of Novem- 
ber. 

Tobacco, Uimianufactured, from Kentucky and Tennessee Points 
to Charleston — (Docket 14795) — The Bureau filed and is prosecuting 
a formal complaint attacking the export rates on tobacco, unmanufac- 
tured, from Kentucky and Tennessee points to Charleston as compared 
with the rates from these points to the Gulf ports. Briefs in the case 
have been filed, and we are now awaiting the final decision of the In- 
tersate Commerce Commission. 

Import Rates from South Atlantic Ports to the Mid-West Terri- 
tory — (Docket 15291) — A formal complaint has been filed attacking 
the rates on import traff'c from the South Atlantic Ports to points 
of destination in the Central Freight Association or Mid-West Ter- 
ritorv. In this comiplaint we arc asking the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission to establish the same rates from South Atlantic Ports as 
at present in effect from Canadian Ports, Norfolk, Va., and Baltimore, 
Md. The case has been docketed by the Commission and a hearing 
will be had the first part of the year 1924. This complaint was filed 
in order to supplement the revision in exnort rates which was secured 
by the South Atlantic Ports during the Railroad Administration. 

Oyster Shells (crushed) from Charleston to Ohio and Mississippi 
River Crossings — The carriers published, effective February 5th, 1923, 
increased rates on crushed oyster shells from Charleston. The Bureau 
filed with the Interstate Commerce Commission a request for the sus- 
pension of these rates. The tariff" was suspended and the case set for 
hearing. Prior to the hearing of the case, the carriers cancelled the 
inc Tended rates and restored the old rates. The description of the 
commodity, by an agreement with the carriers, was changed to read 
the same as the description from the Gulf Ports. This was one of 
the requests made upon the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Handling Charges (Marginal Tracks and Switching — I. S. Docket 
1737) — The carriers, effective December 2nd, 1922, revised the rates 
for handling at South Atlantic Ports so as to provide a charge for 
shipments that were unloaded on marginal tracks by use of the ship's 
tackle. Upon complaint of the interested parties, the tariff was sus- 
pended and a hearing was had at Mobile. In addition to the change 
in the handling charge, it was also proposed to assess a charge for 
the switching of the car from and to the marginal track. The Bureau 
participated in this complaint, and, after hearing, the case was decided 
in our favor on March 17th, 1923. The handling and switching charges 
proposed by the carriers were withdrawn and the old charges restored. 

Port Charges Investigation — (Docket 12681) — The Interstate Com- 
merce Commiission ordered a general investigation of wharfage, stor- 
age and handling charges at South Atlantic Ports. The Bureau par- 
ticipated in this complaint and .introduced evidence at Charleston and 
supplemented this evidence with brief filed with the Commisssion. 
The case was tentatively decided in favor of the shipping interests 
by the Commission. At the oral argument on April 11th, before the 
Commission the Charleston interests were represented by this organi- 
zation. The case is now awaiting the final decision of the Commis- 
sion. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 25- 

Port Differential Case — Boston Maritime Association — (Docket 
13548) — The Bureau intervened in this case, which was filed by the 
Boston Maritime Association asking for a revision of the export rates 
from the Central Freight Association Territory to all ports, Boston, 
Mass., to Galveston, Tex., inclusive. In this case the Boston interests 
asked the Interstate Commerce Commission to establish the same rates 
on export traffic from this territory to all ports. The case has been 
tentatively decided by the exarniner for the Commission, and an oral 
argument was heard before the Commission on May 22nd at Wash- 
ington. Charleston was represented at this oral argument, and the 
claims of this port and the other South Atlantic Ports were presented 
in regard to the continuation in effect of our export rates from the 
Central Freight Association Territory. This case is awaiting the 
final decision of the Commission. 

Mississippi-Warrior River Barge Line Complaint — (Docket 13290) 
— In this complaint the port interests at New Orleans asked for the 
establishment of water and rail rates from all points in the United 
States to the port of New Orleans. The rates asked for by the port 
interests were to be 80% of the rail rates where such carriers' lines 
parellelled the water lines. The Bureau intervened in this case and 
evidence was presented at New Orleans. We later filed a brief and ap- 
peared at the oral argument before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission. The Com^mission decided the case in our favor, sustaining 
our contention that the Gulf Ports should not be permitted to draw 
freight from our contiguous territory on a lower basis of rail and 
water rates. 

Georgia Rates — (Docket 13275) — The Bureau filed and prosecuted 
a complaint before the Interstate Commerce Commission asking for 
a revision of the rates on classes and commodities from Charleston and 
Jacksonville to Georgia destinations so as to place these two ports 
in line with the Georgia ports of Savannah and Brunswick. _ This case 
is now awaiting a final decision by the Commission. Prior to this 
decision, the Railroad Commission of Georgia is revising its rates with- 
in the State of Georgia and is removing, to a great extent, the dis- 
criminations complained of by us in our case. This case will not 
be decided until the Commission hands down its decision in the Gen- 
eral Class Rate Investigation. The tentative report ,as stated above, 
is expected in the General Class Rate Case, about the last part of 
Novem.ber, and a decision in the Georgia Rate Case is expected about 
the same time. 

Cotton Transit Privileges — (Docket -14978) — This case was filed by 
the Savannah Traffic Bureau, in which they complain about the cot- 
ton transit privileges in the Southern Territory. This Bureau inter- 
vened in the case and took part in the hearing at Savannah before the 
Interstate Com^merce Commission on November 2nd-3rd. This case 
has not been completed, and has been assigned for further hearing 
at Washington on December 3rd. 

C. C. & O. Railway Lease — The Bureau co-operated with the Cham- 
ber of Commerce and the City of Charleston in presenting our case 
to the South Carolina Railroad Commission, also the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, asking them not to ratify the lease of the C. C. & 
O. Railway by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Louisville & 
Nashville Railroad. The case has been briefed and is set for oral ar- 
gument at Washington on December 29th, 1923. 

Revision of Rates between Southeastern Points and South At- 
lantic Ports — The Bureau protested vigorously against the carriers' 
temporary revision of rates between Southeastern points and the South 
Atlantic Ports. _ A petition was filed with the Interstate Commerce 
Commission asking for a suspension of these rates, but this petition 



26 Mayor Grace's Animal Review 

was dis allowed. The revised figures are now in effect but are only 
temporary in character and are subject to further revision when the 
Commission makes its decision in the General Class Rate Case. 

Szvitching to the Baltimore & Carolina Steamship Company's Docks 
— An informal complaint was filed with the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission protesting against the assessment of a switcliing charge on 
through business via Charleston in connection with the Baltimore & 
Carolina Line. The Commission investigated the question and ruled 
that there was no undue discrimination against Charleston and that 
the switching charge assessed by the carriers was proper on through 
business moving via Charleston in connection with the Baltimore & 
Carolina Line. 

Fertilizer and Fertilizer Materials — The Bureau co-operated with 
other communities in presenting a complaint to the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission in reference to the rates on fertilizer and fertilizer 
material vvithin the vSouthern Territory. This complaint has not been 
docketed, and is now awaiting such acdon by the Commission. Pend- 
ing the hearing of this case, the South Carolina Railroad Commission 
signified its intention of revising the rates on fertilizer within South 
Carolina. The Bureau appeared before this commission but was unable 
to prosecute the matter as the Supreme Court ruled that the Railroad 
Commission had no authority to revise rates within the state. The 
State Railroad Commission is seeking a reversal of the decision of 
the Supreme Court, and the revision of rates within South Carolina 
will have to be held up pending the disposition of this case. As soon 
as this is decided we will again present our case to the Railroad Com- 
mission for a revision of the South Carolina rates. On November 
26th the Georgia Railroad Commission will have a hearing in refer- 
ence to the fertilizer rates within Georgia. These rates have a direct 
bearing upon the rates within South Carolina, and the Bureau will be 
represented at the hearing before the Georgia Railroad Commission 

Sand, Gravel and Stone Rates — The Bureau has presented to the 
Railroad Commission of South Carolina a revised scale of rates for 
joint hauls on sand, gravel and stone within this state. This case is 
being held up pending the determination of the status of the Railroad 
Commission by the Supreme Court. 

Lime Rates — The Southern carriers have tentatively presented to 
the shippers revised commodity rates for application on lime within the 
Southern Territory. As soon as these rates are published in tariff 
form it is the intention of the Bureau to ask for their suspension and 
a hearing before the Interstate Comrtlerce Commission. 

Cement Rates — A revision has been secured in the cement rates 
from Charleston to North Carolina points in an effort to equalize 
tliis port with Wilmington in the distribution of cement within that 
state. This revison was made effective June 10th, 1923, and the re- 
vised figures were issued in compliance with the request of the Bureau. 

Ice Rates — The rates on ice in less than carload quantities from 
Charleston to South Carolina points were increased by the carriers 
during the first part of the year. The Bureau filed a protest with the 
Railroad Commisssion of South Carolina and after a hearing before 
this commission we were successful in securing revised rates on ice 
in less than carload quantities within South Carolina. The new rates 
were published effective March 15th, 1923, and have proved satisfactory 
to the ice manufacturers within the state. 

Export and Import Rate Adjustments — ^A revision was secured 
in the import rates on green coffee from Charleston to Southeastern 
and Western destinations. The new rates are made the same as from 
New Orleans, and are reductions in the figures formerly in effect. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 27 

Machinery and Boilers from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Charleston — 
Secured revision of these rates in line with the rates to the Gulf Ports. 
(Reduction) 

Drugs — Chicago, 111., and Indianapolis, Ind., to South Atlantic 
Ports — We were successful in securing a reduction in these rates. 
Tobacco — Leaksville, N. C. to Charleston. (Reduction) 
Barytcs, Carload — Emerson, Ga., to South Atlantic Ports (Reduc- 
tion) 

Mine Cars — Knoxville, Tenn to Charleston. (Reduction) 
Cotton Card Strippings — Charleston to Ware Shoals. (Reduction) 
Cement — Charleston to North Carolina Points. (Reduction) 
Nezvsprint Paper — Charleston to Southeastern Points. (Reduction) 
AHtre Cake — Charleston to Canton, N. C. (Reduction) 
Tobacco — Charleston to Carolina Points. (Reduction) • 

Nitre of Soda — South Atlantic Ports to Ohio and Mississippi River 
Crossings — The carriers proposed to advance our rates on this com- 
modity, making them the same as from Baltinaore, Md., and higher 
than from the Gulf Ports. Upon protest, the revised rates were with- 
drawn and the old figures restored. 

Flax Seed and Sesame Seed (Imported) — South Atlantic Ports, 
Gulf and Norfolk, Va., to Eiberton, Ga — Charleston same as Savannah, 
and less than all other ports. (Reduction) 

Flax Seed (Imported) — Charleston to St. Paul and Minneapolis, 
Minn. — Revised rate of 49^ cents published. (Reduction) 

Linseed Oi/— Charleston to Ohio River and Virginia Cities — New 
rates established in line wth rates from Savannah, Ga., and Norfolk, 
Va. (Reductons) 

Aluminum (Imported) — Charleston to Birmingham, Ala. — New- 
rate of 32 cents per 100 pounds established. (Reduction) 

Burlap and Gunny Bagging — Charleston to Nashville, Tenn. — New 
Orleans, La., to Nashville, Tenn. (Reduction) 

Miscellaneous Adjustments 

Freight Service — Handled for the Geer Drug Company their com- 
plaint about the freight service to Andrews and Georgetown, S. C. 
Induced the Seaboard Air Line Railway to establish package car service 
to these two points. Delivery to Andrews is now made on the following 
morning, and to Georgetown the following afternoon. 

Cheese Rates — Cheese from Wisconsin Points to Charleston. At- 
tention of interested consignees called to the lower rates via Baltimore, 
Md., in connection with the Baltimore & Carolina Steamship Company. 

Cotton Piece Goods — Charleston to Eastern Destinations — Handling 
with carriers revision in these rates, and hope to have established 
within the ensuing year special commodity rates applicable as above. 

Cotton Piece Goods — North Carolina Mills via Charleston and 
Clyde Line to Eastern Destinations — Handling with Clyde Steamship 
Company and the carriers the question of establishing special commodity 
rates on cotton piece goods from North Carolina mills to Eastern des- 
tinations for m.ovement via Charleston in connection with the Clyde 
Steamship Company. ... 

Sugar — Charleston and Savannah to Carolina Territory — This 
Bureau has intervened in the complaint filed by the Savannah Sugar 
Refining Corporation attacking the rates on sugar from Charleston to 
the Carolina Territory. This case has not been set for hearing, but it 
is our purpose to protect the interests of the distributors located at 
Charleston. 



28 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Cotton Batting — Charleston to Ohio and Mississippi River Cross- 
ings Northern and Western Points, and Southeastern Points — Hand- 
Hng witli the carriers the question of estahhshing- special commodity 
rates appHcahle as above from Charleston. 

Grapes, less than Carload — Charleston to Carolina Points — Secured 
reduction in the present rates. 

Scrap Metal — Charleston to Eastern and Western Points — Secured 
reduction in rates from Charleston and a realignment of our rates with 
the rates from Savannah. 

Cotton — North Carolina Points to New England Mill Points via 
Charleston in Connection with the Clyde Line — New points of origin 
have been added. We are still at work upon this adjustment and hope 
during the coming year to increase this territory so as to enable our 
cotton interests to draw cotton from as wide a terriory as the com- 
peting ports. 

Cotton — Carolina Territory via Augusta Compress to Charleston — 
Rates revised permitting the movment of cotton via this compress to 
Charleston from Carolina Territory at the same rates as in effect to 
Savannah. 

Rough Glass and IVindoiv Glass — Buffalo-Pi tt.sburgh Territory to 
Charleston — Revision secured which makes our rates the same as those 
in effect to Savannah. (Reduction) 

Watermelons — Seaboard Air Line Railway Stations in North Caro- 
lina to Charleston — Secured reduction in these rates. 

Talc — Charleston to Nashville, Tenn. (Reduction) 

Canned Goods — Union, S. C. to Charleston.' (Reduction). 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOS. J. BURKE, 

Commissioner. 



PORT UTILITIES COMMISSION 



The financial report of the Port Utilities Commission for the 
year 1923 shows that operations for the year resulted in a net profit 
of $63,555.08, and the statement of assets and liabilities shows the 
former to be $2,668,341.56 and the latter $2,568,00L59, leaving a sur- 
plus of $100,339.07. 

The year's revenue from active operations, including railway, 
wharfage and storage, amounted to $343,323.57, and deducting operat- 
ing expenses of $197,235.05 a balance of $146,088.52 remains. Adding 
to this the net revenue from rents, $n,067.22, brings the gross operat- 
ing profits to $157,155.74. The administrative and general expenses, 
$37,512.28, deducted, leave a net profit of $119,643.46, and other in- 
come brings the total to $123,152.12. Subtracting other deductions 
from this sum, $59,597.04, leaves the net profit of $63,555.08. 

The surplus of $100,339.97 is arrived at as follows: 

Balance December 31. 1922_ $ 31,912.31 

Interest earned $ 57,867.11 

Unrefundable ovei-charges _ 14.75 

Insurance Collected _. 3,000.00 

Net profit from operations— .-_ 63,555.08 

Total ..._ --... 124,376.94 

Total credits to surplus — ..$ 156,289.25 



Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv 29 

DEBITS : 

Interest on bonds... _ __ 112,500.00 

Less interest charge to operations 60,743.86 

$ 51,756.14 

Plus miscellaneous items _ 4,293.14 

Total debits _. 55,949.28 



Surplus — .__ $ 1 GO, 389 . 97 

The following is the statement of assets and liabilities : 

Assets — (Current) : 

Cash ...$1,097,841.40 

Bills collectible 22,492.51 



Total current assets $1,120,333.91 

Investment in Permanent Assets: 

Property, original purchase $1,255,953.22 

Subsequent New construction 215,279.16 

Additions to equipment 41,386.18 



Total $ 1 ,512,618.50 

Less disposals and retirements 10,886.15 



Total investment in permanent assets .$1,501,732.41 

Deferred charges 46,275.24 



Total assets $2,668,341.56 

LIABILITIES: 

Accounts payable .....$ 65,774.72 

Bonded indebtedness 2,500,000.00 

Reserves for depreciation 2,226.87 



Total $2,568,001.59 

Surplus .-.- -- $ 100,339.97 



BUREAU OF FOREIGN TRADE AND PORT 
DEVELOPMENT 



Purpose of Bureau : 

Organized May 1, 1923 under joint auspices of the City of Char- 
leston and the Charleston Chamber of Commerce 

As the name implies an agency for the development of the Port 
of Charleston through suitable publicity, the bringing here of new 
carriers the attracting of new industries, the extension of foreign 
trade and the providing of specialized service relative to matters ancil- 
liary to shipping. 

Because budget would not permit of direct newspaper and mag- 
azine advertising, Bureau has been compelled to adopt an indirect camp- 
aign along this line and through the following mediums : Magazine 
articles relative to the port. Newspaper editorials, Weely and Monthly 
marine letters. Exhibits, Port booklets, Surveys, Speeches and Lectures, 
Correspondence, Personal interviews. Trade Conventions and business 
trips. Not including news items nor newspaper interviews given the 
amount of legitimate advertising secured through the country's press, 
if paid for at standard space rates, would more than counterbalance the 
entire operating cost of the Bureau to date. 



30 Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 

Articles Advertising Charleston : 

Magazines and trade papers : 

Mannfacturercs Record "Iron ore through Charleston" IHuslrated 
and "Port of Charleston" Ilhistrated. 

Nautical Gazette "Port of Charleston like New York" Illustrated. 

Carolina Industries, "Ancient Charleston Realizing Its Modern 
Possihilties" Illustrated; South Atlantic Ports, Growth of South"; 
Shinper and Carrier, "Port of Charleston" Illustrated; Pacific Marine 
Review, Monthly series on Charleston- Custom House Guide, Compila- 
tion of port data with Capt. S. Olsen ; Marine Engineering, "Resolu- 
tion concerning fair and equal treatment for outports" ; World's 
Markets, *'An Ancient Crane"; Rand McNally Atlas, Port Data; 
port and Teminal, "Port of Charleston, S. C."; Cotton Nev/s, 
"Charleston and Its port", "Charleston's Coastwise Serxace", and 
"Charleston's Foreign Trade". 

Poster Magazine, "Charleston's Unique Exhibits". 

Inland Waterways "Port of Charleston S. C"; Dock and Harbour 
Authority, "Port of Charleston S. C." ; Dock and Harbour A.uthority, 
"An Ancient Crane". 

A 1923 Trade Resume of Charleston appeared in the following 
publications. 

Marine Review, Nautical Gazette, Tournal of Commerce, New 
York Alaritime Register, World's Markets, Marine Engineering, 
Shipper and Carrier Marine News, The Traffic World, Engineering 
News Record, Commerce Reports, Manufacturers Record, Iron Age, 
Export Trade & Finance, Pigott's Bulletin, Military Engineer, Com- 
mercial News, Shipping Guide, Panama Canal Record, Guide, Com- 
merce & Martime Record, Waterway's Journal, Marine Journal, Motor 
Ship, Ocean Engineer, Ship News Commercial List & Maritime 
Register. 

Newspaper Editorials : 

3 special articles Charleston American, 6 special articles Evening 
Post, 2 special atticles Columbia State Daily article News & Courier 
(under Foreign Trade & Port Development) Issues widely quoted and 
reprinted throughout 4he state. 

Weekly Marine Letters : 

Issued each Friday to 21 shipping and martime publications. 

Monthly Marine Letters: 

Issued monthly to 6 maritime publications. 
Foreign Releases : 

Special items issued from time to time in French, Spanish and 
German. 

Exhibits : (Placards Posters and Charts) 

C. P. A. Banquet, Charleston (June^i 

Mid-West Farmers and Manufacturers Foreign Trade Convention 
(June 29-30). 

State Commercial Secretaries Convention Columbia (Sept. 9). 

Made-In-Carolina Exposition, Charlotte (Sept. 27-Oct. 10) 500 
special briefs distributed. 185 cotton mill representatives reached. 

Third Annual Marine Exposition, New York (Nov. 5-10) 2 booths 
provided. Several hundred special briefs distributed and contact had 
with as many representatives of shipping and transportation concerns. 

Walterboro — Exhibit of posters in connection with address to 
Business Men's League. 



Mayor Grace's Anmial Review 31 

Port Booklets: (10 graphic charts, 11 pages descriptive data). 

Brief addressed to CaroHna Shippers and Textile Manufacturers. 
500 copies distributed. Brief addressed to general shipping industry. 
500 copies printed for distribution. Collection forwarded through 
German Consul to numerous shipping firms in his country. 

Special Surveys : 

Brief and survey for U. S. Steel Corporation in reoperating ships 
from Charleston. SS BANTU sailing from Charleston to Chilian 
ports Feb. 8 first fruits of this contact. 

Survey Southern cotton piece goods situation. Contact with 185 
mills. 

Survey coffee distribution point at Charleston. 

Survey for Channel Steel Barge Company. 
Survey for Ford Motor Company. 

Survey John Barton Payne reshipment Far East relief goods 
through Charleston. 

Survey sea island routes in reservice Beaufort-Charleston Line. 

Survey from German Consul in repiece goods. 

Survey Navy Department retroop movement facilities through 
Charleston. 

Four surveys re-oil storage and refining depots at Charleston for 
four large oil companies. 

Survey for Suffolk Peanut Company re-location of plant at Char- 
leston. 

Speeches and Lectures: 

Fifty-two public speeches and lectures relative to port of Charleston 

Correspondence : 

Thirty-one hundred letters written relative to port development. 

Personal Interviews : 

Over seven hundred interviews with commercial representatives 
and others. 

Foreign Trade and Shipping Information : 

Cooperation of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce 
at Washington secured. A file of foreign trade information maintained. 
A file of shipping information maintained. Nucleus of a library on 
port matters and shipping formed. Reading table provided with lead- 
ing national and international shipping and trade magazines. Open to 
public. List of trade opportunities published on bulletion board. Large 
number of trade opportunities letters sent to individuals interested in 
particular line. 

Statistics : 

Current port statistics and other data compiled. Eight hundred 
and thirty-two (832) government reports analyzed and filed. 

Official Visitors Privately Bntertained by Commissioner: 

Mr. Jackson of New York arranged trip to Navy Yard and Port 
Terminals and address before Chamber of Commerce re St. Lawrence 
Channel. Mr. Chas. A. McKean, Industrial Manager, Seaboard Air 
Line Mr. William Brittain, General Mngr. Import and Export Board 
of Trade. Mr. Baker, of Baltimore. Several officials from the "Esther 
Weems". Mr. Ernest Shipman moving picture producer in re-location 
Charleston. Two days lunch and to Folly Beach. Mr. J. C. Williams, 



v32 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcinew 



Southern Railroad (Industrial, Manager). Captain John Jackson 
(Commander U.S.N.) of the U.S.S. NORTH DAKOTA. Captain 
Gherardi and Commander Leah}^ of tlie Air Squadrons and U.S.S. 
WRIGHT on occasion of two different visits to Charleston. Mr. 
Howard and Captain H. S. Wilkins U.S.A., Ordnance survey taken to 
Port Terminals and other points of interest. 

Conventions Attended by Commissioner MacBlwec : 

New Orleans National Foreign Trade Convention as delegate 
from Charleston (Ma}' 2-6,) Contact U. S. Steel officials, Mr. Lilly, etc. 

Cincinnati: Mid-West Fanners and Manufacturers foreign Trade 
Convention (June 29-30). 

Columbia: Commercial Secretaries Association (Sept. 11-12). 

1. Endorsement State Port at Charleston (passed resolution). 2. 
Endorsement of State Zoning Law. 

Brunswick: South Atlantic Ports Association (Oct. 13). Put 
through following resolutions. 1. Endorsing Charleston Navy Yard. 

2. Cooperative Show at Boston, 1924. 3. Reaffirming policy of 
cooperation. 

Brunswick: Atlantic Coastal Highway Association (Oct. 13). New 
York: American Marine Congress (Nov. 5-10). 1. Member steering 
Committee of seven — of resolutions committee. 2. Secured resolu- 
tion ; equal and fair rail and water rates for all outports. 3. Chairman 
Southern States Committee. 

Norfolk: Atlantic Deeper Waterways Convention: (Nov. 13-16). 
Trips Other than Conventions: 

Washington (June 7-15) Interviewed Jas. A. Farrel who is inter- 
ested in port. Conferred with Department of Commerce in re service 
to exporters and to New York to see offic:als of the Clyde Line. 

New York: (July 24- Aug. 4) Promise from large exporting and 
ship operation corporation to use Charleston as a port. Many calls in 
re coffee importation through Charleston. Interviewed number of ship 
owners and started negotiation concerning pageant film. 

Flat Rock: (Sept. 9-14) Conference and through upper part state 
speaking. Clinchfteld hearing. Secretaries Convention, etc. 

Washington: (Sept. 23-Oct. 1) In re Navy Yard and Navy Day 
celebration. Secured U. S. S. WRIGHT and 20 seaplanes. Also to 
New York in re Marine Association Exhibit. Saw Mr. Farrel re 
port of Charleston. 

New York: (Nov. 2-18) Marine exposition (coincident with 
Marine Congress) and other matters. To Norfolk and to Washington 
re follow up of Navy Day celebration and securing Major Division of 
Pacific Fleet for anchorage at Charleston after manoeuvres. Secured 
U.S.S. HENDERSON and Secretary Denby's party of newspaper 
owners. 

Drafting by Assistant Commissioner in Addition to Executive Duties: 
15 standard posters made for use at exhibits. 14 graphs and maps 
for use in briefs and with articles. 5 layouts U. S. Army Supply Bases, 
for comparing advantages of Charleston base. Several miscellaneous 
illustrations and cover designs for individuals to be used in port ad- 
vertising. 

Free Local Advertising Service : 

Bureau has prepared copy, designs, and estimates for several con- 
cerns where direct port advertising was concerned. Prepared graphs in 
cooperation with Port Utilities Commission relative to state port com- 
mission visit. Secured a good collecton of commercial air views for 
use in advertising. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 33 

Bmployment Services : 

Contact made with a number of men specialized in certain branches 
of work on behalf of certain local firms needing men of that type. 

Local Industrial Assistance Other than Routine Rendered: 

For Charleston Dry Dock and Machine Co: Secured U.S. Ship- 
ping Board vessel for docking. 

For Navy Yard : Letters and telegrams to all South Carolina 
delegates and to Navy Department in re scrapping battleships at 
local yard. 

At request of local coal firms: Sent telegrams to Coolidge and 
other re threatened anthracite coal shortage. 

For local advertising concern : Presented plan before Rotary for 
outdoor advertising. 

For Mr. Doten: Prepared special letters of introduction to New 
York carriers. 

For Captain Olsen: Special port data and views for New York 
trip. 

For Mr. Von Dohlen : Same as above. 

For Mr. Ross Hanahan, and Mr. Visanska ; Letters of introduc- 
tion to Consular and Departments of State and Commerce officials in 
Europe. 

For firm contemplating bus line to meet steamers : Data con- 
cerning operating costs. 

Contact for Chamber of Commerce in re motion picture industries. 

Charleston Radio Club : Advances to Naval officials re radio inter- 
ference. 

Marine Exhibit secured for Charleston museum. 
For Port Terminals: Contact with skilled European Assistants for 
trade extension. 

Secured stop-over privileges from Clyde Line. 

Contact with Navy Department re bringing of vessels from Pacific 
Fleet. 

Navy Day Celebration : 

Idea conceived by Colonel Barnwell using Navy Day to aid Navy 
Yard, threatened with discontinuance. Commissioner MacElwee to 
Washington on U.S.S. NORTH DAKOTA re naval business, dis- 
cussed status of Navy Yard with Secretary Denby, Asst. Secretary 
Roosevelt, Admirals Eberle, Gregory, Russeau, Carpenter, with Cap- 
tain McNamee, Commander Eppley, (National Navy Day Chairman) 
the Navy League and others. Tentative naval program was mapped 
out and additional features secured Bureau assisted Navy Day pub- 
licity by preparing various news articles relative to celebration. 

City Planning and Zoning with Special Reference to Port Developments 
Inaugurated campaign for zoning and city planning in cooperation 
with Manager of Chamber of Comm,erce. Delivered speech at Colum- 
bia relative to State Zoning Law— drafted resolution passsed by conven- 
tion State Commercial Secretaries Ass'n. Presented paper before 
Society of Terminal Engineers, in New York, in re comprehensive port 
and city planning, stressing Charleston. 

Most Important Work Accomplished by Bureaus 

1. Procuring assurance from Mr. James A. Farrell, President of Un- 
ited State Steel Corporation that some of its vessels will be operated 
through Charleston. SS BANTA sailing February 8 for Valparaiso, 



34 Mayor Grace's Annual Rezicw 

Tahira and Callao, Chile, with steel rails from Birmingham, initial 
sailing. Isthmian Line to operate to far eastern ports. 

2. Blanketing contry with special magazine articles and newspaper 
publicity concerning port of Charleston. 

3. (3rganization of Southern States Committee of the American 
Marine Association covering all South Atlantic and Gulf ports with 
the control of same vested in Port of Charleston through the appoint- 
ment of Commissioner R. S. MacElwee as Chairman of this Committee. 

4. Publicity obtained especially through the two port exhibits at 
Charlotte, N. C, and New York; and other exhibits. 

5. Obtaining support and interest of Navy Department and gov- 
ernment officials in Charleston Navy Yard and Navy Day Celebration. 

6. Survey of Southern Cotton textile industry with intensive follow- 
up campaign relative to diverting shipping through Charleston. 185 
firms reached. 

7. Interchange of sales and publicity ideas wath development bur- 
eaus of other ports. 

In all these activities close cooperation with Commissioner Burke of 
the Traffic Bureau and Mr. McDermid, County Agricultural Agent 
whose assistance in supplying bases of facts, has been invaluable.. 

Work in Course of Completion: 

At Mayor Stoney's suggestion worked out details of statewide 
speaking tour re Port of Charlesston, Mr. Russell cooperating in 
the forwarding of correespondence through the Chamber of Commerce, 

Series of etchings of Charleston's industries and facilities to be 
used on Port Booklet. The Assistant Commissioner, who in the 
course of his practice has had more than 5,000 magazine and com- 
mercial drawings published, is preparing these etchings at an estimated 
saving to this city of $3,000, that being the price asked by an outside 
firm tor the series. 

Contact with Arbuckle Bros, who are in favor of shipping 
coffee through here. 

Contact Lawrence & Company re shipping textiles through 
Charleston. 

Contact with McMyler Interstate Company re estimate ore hand- 
ling machines. 

Negotiations with W. R. Grace Company. 

Negotiation being carried on with New York barge building con- 
cern relative to bringing plant to Charleston. 

Preparation of a series of exhibits showing advantages of Char- 
leston as a port, same to be sent to various schools conducting ship- 
ping courses. 

Contact with Luckenbach SS Company and Panama Line (I.M.M.) 
and others relative to making Charleston a port of call. 

Preparation of large w^all map showing strategic location of 
Charleston to center of world trade. 

Preparation of folder for enclosure in Bureaus letters and for 
distribution among interested firms. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 35 

REPORT OF CORPORATION COUNSEL 



To the Hon. the Mayor and Aldermen 
of the City of Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith file my Annual Report for the year ending 
December 31, 1923, in accordance with the ordinances in 
such cases made and provided. 

As called on from time to time throughout the year, I 
have advised the Mayor, Members of the Board of Alder- 
men, Committees, City Council, and the heads of the various 
departments whenever requested so to do, and at their re- 
quest attended in person hearings before committees, and 
have prepared ordinances and resolutions from time to time. 

Pknding Suits and Claims 

Claim of O. P. Ericson vs. City, $3,006.46, for damages 
to personal property by alleged negligent operation of truck 
belonging to City. This claim is still pending. 

Claim of John L. Peacock by his Guardian ad Litem, vs. 
City, $500.00 damages to automobile on account of hole 
left open in street. Pending. 

Claim of Amos Blidgen vs. City, for damages to wagon 
by collision. Claim for $100.00. Pending. 

Claim of Jason Brown, Et AL, vs. City. Claim for 
$4,084.00. Complaint alleges damage by fire on March 
11th, 1922, to dwelling and contents by reason of alleged 
improper construction of fire hydrant and failure to keep 
the same in repair. Pending. 

Claim of Jo Whale, Administrator of the estate of Sadie 
Whale, vs. City. Claim for $10,000. Complaint alleges 
negUgent killing of minor, Sadie Whale, by fire truck on 
November 8, 1922. Pending. 

Claim of Joseph E. Jenkins vs. City. Claim for $26,026- 
.13. Complaint demands reimbursement of plaintiff by 
City for above amount, alleged to have been expended by 
him for installation of drains at **Rutledge Heights". Pend- 
ing. 



36 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Chiim of Edward J. Murphy vs. City. Ckiini for $61.50 
for refund of taxes. Pending. 

Claims and Suits on Bkhalf of City. 

Claim City vs. Charleston Consolidated Ry. & Ltg. Co. 
Amount of claim $20,051.52, with interest. The City in- 
stituted this suit to compel reimbursement of the cost of as- 
phalt paving laid in 1919 on King Street from Hasell Street 
on the south to Mary Street on the north, between and on 
both sides of tracks of the Company. The Company denied 
liability on the ground that, having once before, in 1911, 
paid its proportionate share of the cost of the paving of this 
street with vitrified brick, its franchise did not authorize the 
City to compel it to pay for 'Vepaving." In other words 
that it having once paid its share for a new pavement such 
payment was exhaustive of its franchise liability. Settled 
for $19,414.91, there being mecessary adjustments of cer- 
tain items. 

Claim City vs. Charleston Consolidated Ry. & Ltg. Co. 
Amount of claim $1,500.00. Claim based on damages to 
fire truck on December 8, 1922, on way to fire, due to neg- 
ligent operation of street car. Pending. 

I have prepared briefs and examined titles on properties 
to be purchased by City and advised thereon, and also I 
have prepared and examined and approved bonds and con- 
tracts of contractors in connection with paving, drain and 
sewer work in the City. 

Numerous claims in bankruptcy on behalf of the City 
were filed and collected by me during the past year. 

During the year 1923 I handled a number of bond issues 
for the City. Among these was the issue of $500,000.00, 
4% Sewer Bonds, dated March 1st, 1923. At the time of 
the settlement for these bonds by purchasers a dispute arose 
as to the construction of their bid, with the result that by 
agreement it was submitted to arbitration. The Board of 
Arbitrators met in the City of New York and a satisfactory 
settlement was obtained for the City. 

During the year the City issued three series of paving 
bonds, as follows : Series A, in the amount of $183,000.00, 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 37 

dated August 1st, 1922; Series B, in the amount of $257,- 
000.00, dated May 1st, 1923; and Series C, in the amount 
of $375,000.00, dated November 1st, 1923. 

The Series A paving bonds, dated August 1st, 1922, were 
not sold and delivered until 1923, due to the questions raised 
in the cases of Sullivan vs. City and Smitk vs. City, re- 
ferred to in my report for the year 1922. 

In many of these matters the Assistant Corporation 
Council, Mr. Patla, rendered valued counsel and help. 

Respect fuly submitted, 

JOHN I COSGROVE, 

Corporation Counsel. 



CITY ENGINEER 



To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen, 

The City Council of Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : 

In conformity with section 782, Revised Ordinance, I have 
the honor to submit the Annual Report of the City En- 
gineer's Department for the Year 1923. 

Since the duties of this department are closely asso- 
ciated with the work of the other departments or sub- 
divisions of this department, for which reports are annually 
made, this report has been prepared in condensed form, the 
reader being referred for detailed information to the Annual 
Reports of the Street Department, the Sewer Department 
and The Tidal Drain Department. 

Plans, profiles and specifications have been prepared, 
grade and line pegs set, inspection furnished, and monthly 
and final estimates for contract payments made for con- 
struction of Drains, Sewers, Curb, Roadways and Side- 
walks for streets as shown in the tables accompanying the 
Street Department report. 



38 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

EXPENDITURES— CITY ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT— 1923 

Salaries :— City Engineer $ 6,000.00 

Asst. City Engineer 2,700.00 

Asst. City Engineer 2,400.00 

Rodman 1.020.00 

Stenographer 900.00 

$13,020.00 

Office :— Postage stamps $ 20.00 

Car tokens 82.50 

Bonds 10.00 

Office supplies 5.95 

Telephone 25.20 

Insurance map 28.00 

Typewriter 102.50 

274.15 

Printing and Stationery^ 142.75 

Drawing and Reproducing Material 149.61 

Instruments _ 73.38 

Miscellaneous 14.84 

$13,674.73 

Balance .27 

TOTAL APPROPRIATION 13,675.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. DINGLE, 

City Engineer. 



CITY ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT 



Alderman Walter A. Renhcn, Chairman, 
Committee on Streets, 
Charleston, S. C. 

Dear Sir: 

For the operation, receipts and expenditures of the Street 
Department, during the year 1923, I have the honor to sub- 
mit the following- Annual report covering ''Highway Im- 
provement", ''Highway Maintenance", "Garbage Collec- 
tion" and "Street Cleaning". 

After due advertisement the following contracts were 
awarded by the Committee on Streets : 

Sheet Asphalt Paving : Simons-Mayrant Co., Contractor, Charleston, 
S. C. 

Grading, per sq. yd $ .05 

Concrete Base, 4" thick, per sq. yd 95 

Concrete Base, 5" thick, per sq. yd. ..,. 1.15 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 39 

Concrete Base, 6" thick, per sq. yd 1.30 

Creosoted Wood Block, 3" deep, 16 lb. treatment per sq. yd .... 3.20 

Sheet Asphalt Binder, V/i inches, per sq. yd 40 

Sheet Asphalt Wearing Surface, IJ/2 inches, per sq. yd 59 

Tearing Up and Hauling Old Pavement : 

Vitrified Brick— First 1000' of haul, per sq. yd 08 

Each additional 500', or fraction thereof 01 

Granite Blocks— First 1000' of haul, per sq. yd 10 

Each additional 500', or fraction thereof 01 

Cobble Stones— First 1000' of haul, per sq. yd 08 

Each additional 500', or fraction thereof 01 

Hauling : 

(a) For each cubic yard of excavated material hauled from 
streets about to be paved, for the first 500' or fraction 
thereof, in excess of the 500' of Free Haul 40 

(b). For each additional 500' or fraction thereof, per cu. yd. .03 

(c). Hauling filling furnished by City (other than that 
originating on streets to be paved) ; first 1000' of haul, 
per cu. yd 35 

(d). For each additional 500' of haul or fraction thereof 05 

Broken Stone : 

(a). Crushed stone purchased by Contrator from City, 

per cu. yd 3.37 

(b). Binder stone purchased by Contractor from City, per 

cu. yd _ 3.69 

(c). Screenings purchased by Contractor from City, per cu.yd. 1.50 

Drain Construction: Charleston Engineering & Contracting Co., — 
Contractors, Charleston, S. C. 

Rein-f^orced Concrete Drain, 3 ft. in. x. 3 ft. 6 in. Sheet No. 2, per 
lineal ft. 

Depth over 3', to and including 5' $11.50 

Depth over 5', to and including 7' 12.00 

Depth over 7', to and including 9' 13.00 

Depth over 9', to and including 11' 14.00 

Reinforced Concrete Manholes, for 3' 0''' x 3' 6'^ drain Sheet No. 2 
per M. H.: 

Depth over 1' to and including 3' $75.00 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' 75.00 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 75.00 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 75.00 

Sumps for Manholes, Sheet No. 2, per sump 50.00 

Reinforced Concrete Drain, 4' 0-''' x 4' 0''-' Sheet No. 1, per lineal ft. 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' $13.75 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 14.50 

Depth over 7' 'to and including 9' 15.25 

Depth over 9' to and including 11' 16.00 

Depth over 11' to and including 13' 16.50 

Reinforced Concrete Manholes for 4' C x 4' 0''^ drain, Sheet No. 1, 
per M. H. 

Depth over 1' to and including 3' $75.00 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' 75.00 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 75.00 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 75.00 

Sumps for Manholes, Sheet No. 1, per sump 50.00 



40 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcinew 

Plank Foundation for Reinforced Concrete Drain 3' 0'^ x 3' 6'''', Sheet 
No. 4, per lineal foot of foundation J$0.50 

Plank Foundation for Reinforced Concrete Drain, 4' 0'' x 4^ 0^^, Sheet 
No. 4, per lineal foot of foundation, $0.55 

Pile Foundation for Reinforced Concrete Drain, 3' O''' x y 6'-', Sheet 
No. 4, per lineal foot of foundation : 

Using piles 20' below cut off $2.50 

Using piles 30' below cut off _ 2.90 

Using piles 40' below cut off 3.50 

Using piles 50' below cut off 4.00 

Pile Foundation for Reinforced Concrete Drain, 4' 0''-' x 4' 0''-', Sheet 
No. 4, per lineal foot of foundation : 

Using piles 20' below cut off $2.60 

Using piles 30^ below cut off 3.00 

Using piles 40' below cut off 3.60 

Using piles 50' below cut off 4.10 

Vitrified Pipe Drains, per lineal eoot: 

30''' double strength : 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' $6.60 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 7.00 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 7.85 

Depth over 9' to and including 11' 9.25 

24'' double strength : 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' $4.30 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 4.75 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 5.25 

Depth over 9' to and including 11' 6.75 

Depth over 11' to and including 13' 8.50 

IS^^double strength : 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' $2.65 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 3.15 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 4.00 

Depth over 9' to and including 11' 4.75 

15" Pipe : 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' $1.75 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' _ 2.00 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 3.00 

Depth over 9' to and including 11' 3.90 

12" Pipe : 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' $1.50 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 1.75 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 2.30 

Depth over 9' to and including 11' 3.25 

10" Pipe 

Depth over 1' to and including 3' $0.95 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' 1.15 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 1.35 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 2.20 

8" Pipe : 

Depth over 1' to and including 3' $0.75 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' .-..-,.r-,= 0.90 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 41 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' _ 1.20 

Depth over 7' to and including 9^ 1.75 

Depth over 1' to and inchiding 3' $0.40 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' - 0.50 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 0.60 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 0.80 

Additional for Substituting Cast Iron Pipe for Terra Cotta Pipe, if 
ordered, per lineal foot : 

30'^ C. I. pipe, $6.35 

24^^ C. I. pipe, (225 lbs.) 4.85 

18^^ C. I. pipe, (150 lbs.) 3.35 

15^' C. I. pipe, (125 lbs.) 3.00 

12^' C. I. pipe, ( 75 lbs.) 2.00 

10'^ C. I. pipe, ( 60 lbs.) 1.60 

8^^ C. I. pipe, ( 45 lbs) - 1.20 

6'^ C. I. pipe, ( 30 lbs.) 0.95 

Bottom Plank, with accompany mud-sills, wedges and additional ex- 
cavation, per lineal foot. Sheet No. 1 : 

2 inches x 12 inches $0.30 

3 inches x 12 inches 0.35 

4 inches x 8 inches (doubled) 0.50 

Concrete Bed for Terra Cotta Pipe, if ordered, per lin ft.. Sheet No. 1 : 

30'^ pipe $2.50 

24^^ pipe 2.00 

Pile Foundation for Pipe, if ordered, per lineal foot of foundation. 
Sheet No. 5, Sketch No. 1. 

Using piles 20^ below cut off $2.30 

Using piles 30' below cut off 2.75 

Using piles 40^ below cut off 3.40 

.Using piles 50' below cut off 3.90 

Pile Foundation for Pipe, if ordered, per lineal foat of foundation. 
Sheet No. 5, Sketch No. 2 : 

Using piles 20' below cut off $2.25 

Using piles 30' below cut off 2.70 

Using piles 40' below cut off 3.35 

Using piles 50' below cut off 3.85 

Brick Manholes, 5' diam^eter, complete with castings, per M. H. Sheet 
No. 3: 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' $ 85.00 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' : 100.00 

Depth over 9' to and including 11' „. 115.00 

Depth over 11' to and including 13' 130.00 

Brick Manholes, 4' diameter, complete with castings, per M. H., Sheet 
No. 3: 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' $ 80.00 

Depth over 7' to and including 9' 90.00 

Depth over 9' to and including 11' 110.00 

Depth over 11' to and including 13' 120.00 

Pile Foundation for Manholes, if ordered, per foundation, Sheet No, 5: 

Using piles 20' below cut off $25.00 

Using piles 30' below cut off 30.00 



42 Mayor (j race's Annual Review 



Using piles 40' below cut off 36.00 

Using piles 50' below cut off 45.00 

Cutting opening in old Manhole for connection with new drain : 

Per opening $1.00 

Cutting opening in old pipe drain for connection with new pipe : 

Per opening $1.00 

Removing old pipe drain, main line, per lineal ft $0.25 

Removing old brick drain, per lineal ft $0.20 

Removing old Pipe Drain Manholes, per M. H $5.00 

Removing old Inlet Basins, per Inlet Basin $1.00 

Brick Gutter Inlet Basins, complete zvith castings, Sheet No. 3, per I. B. 

Depth over 3' to and including 5' $15.00 

.Depth over 5' to and including 7' 17.00 

Brick Curb Inlet Basins, complete zvith castings, Sheet No. 3, per I. B. : 

Depth over 3' to and including 5^ $22.00 

Depth over 5' to and including 7' 24.00 

Sheath piling left in place, if ordered by City Engineer, 

Per M. feet B. M. in place $30.00 

Extra Concrete, if ordered, per cu. yd. in place $12.00 

Extra Brick Work, if ordered, per cu. yd. in place $20.00 

Extra Lumber for Foundation, if ordered, 

Per M. feet B. M. in place 6 $30.00 

Extra Excavation, if ordered, per cu. yd $2.00 

Concrete Sidezvalks — Simons-Mayrant Co., Contractors, Charleston, S. 
Taking up old pavement and piling same in gutter, per sq. yd. : 

Flagstone $0.04 

Brick $0.04 

Concrete Sidewalk, as specified, per sq. yd 1.32 

Hauling old flagstone a distance not exceeding 500', per sq. yd .08 

For each additional 500', yer sq. yd. per unit of 500' 02 

Hauling excavated material a distance not exceeding 500'' 

per cu. yd _ 34 

For each additional 500', per cu. yd. per unit of 500' 04 

Furnishing and setting brass street name plates as specified .... 2.50 
The following bids Vv^erc received for Terra Cotta Pipe, Building 
Material and implements, but were not accepted : 

Terra Cotta Pipe and Building Material — Carolina Portland Cement 
Co., Van-Smith Building Material Co., F. O. B. Charleston, S. C. 

6'^ per ft 

8^' per ft _ 

10^' per ft 

12'^ per ft 

15^^ per ft 

18'^ D. S. per ft 

24" D. S. per ft _ 

30^^ D. S. per ft 

6 inch caps, 6c each. 



Pipe 


Fittings 


.$0,195 


$ 1.00 


. .325 


1.75 


. .42 


2.00 


- .55 


3.00 


. .81 


4.00 


. 1.40 


5.75 


. 2.50 


10.00 


. 4.50 


19.50 



Cement, 

Per 95 pounds, delivered $ 0.85 

Sacks, extra 10 

Sacks, when returned allowed 10 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 43 



Sand, 

(Pon Pon) f.o.b. Charleston 1.50 

Brick, 

"run of hard", per M 16.00 

"Selected hard", per M 17.00 

Furnishing Granite Curb — F. H. Opper, Contractor, Savannah, Ga. 

4^^ X 16'''' straight granite curbing, per lineal foot $0.33% 

4" X 18^'' straight granite curbing, per lineal foot 41 ^/^ 

4" X 16'''' circular granite curbing (any radius) per lineal ft. .38% 
4" X 18'''' circular granite curbing (any radius) per lineal ft. 48^ 
f.o.b. Charleston, S. C. 

Setting Granite Curb and Adjusting Storm Inlets — James Begley, Con- 
tractor, Charleston, S. C. 

Taking up old brick curb, per foot ^0.005 

Taking up old stone curb, per foot 02 

Setting 14^^ Granite Curb, per foot 04 

Setting 16^^ Granite Curb, per foot 06 

Setting 18/' Granite Curb, per foot 06 

Constructing, if ordered, Brick Curb Inlet Basins 32^^ x 

26%'^ out to out, 3' to_5' deep, per basin $13.00 

Constructing, if ordered, Brick Gutter Inlet Basins, 25" x 

22y2^^, out to out, 3' to 5' deep, per basin 9.00 

Constructing, if ordered. Manholes, per M. H $60.00 

Laying Terra Cotta pipe for Inlet Basins and House Connections, 
if ordered : 

6''^ cut 1' to 3', per lineal foot of pipe, $0.20 

6" cut 3' to 5', per lineal foot of pipe, 23 

8''' cut 1' to 3', per lineal foot of pipe, .30 

8" cut 3' to 5', per lineal foot of pipe, 32 

10''^ cut 1' to 3^ per lineal foot of pipe, 35 

10'''' cut 3' to 5', per lineal foot of pipe, 40 

Hauling Granite Curb — I. S. K. Ellsworth, Sr., Contractor, Charleston, 
S C 
' Per "2000 lbs $0.90 

Furnishing Castings, (General) — I, S. K. Ellsworth, Sr., Contractor, 

Charleston, S- C, per pound $0.02% 

Special — Greenwood Iron Works, Greenwood, S. C, Chas. 

D. D. & M. Co., Charleston, S. C, John F. Riley F. M. Wks. .03 

Implements — M. H. Lazarus & Co., 

Hvass Brooms, 6 row, 16'''', double holes, without handles, 

per doz $ 8.50 

Handles for same, per doz 1.25 

Forks, 6 tine, strapped, per doz 16.00 

Handles for same, per doz 3.50 

D. handle shovels, per doz 14.50 

Removing Dead Animals — P. J. Aylward, Contractor, Charleston, S. C. 
Per year $780.00 

Harness Work — A. R. Thomlinson, Charleston, S. C. 
Wheelwright Work— 11. Steinken & Co., Charleston, S. C. 
Horse Shoeing- — Leonard & Magrath, Contractors, Charleston, S. C. 
Per Head per month $2.50 



44 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Moving Boulevard Monument — (Murray Boulevard and Rutledge Ave) 
From Roadway to Seawall, Dawson Engineering Compeny, Con- 
tractors, Charleston, S. C $293.00 



IMPROVEMENTS 

A tabulated statement on file in the City Engineer's of- 
fice furnishes information concerning the improvement of 
streets included in the 1923 schedule of street improvements 
which has not yet been completed. The improvements em- 
brace ''Drain Construction", ''Granite Curb", "Sheet As- 
phalt Pa;ving", (with two stretcher courses of creosoted 
wood blocks on each side of each rail on streets occupied 
by street car tracks) and "Concrete Sidewalks." 

Sheet Asphalt Laboratory Inspection was furnished by Parker Lab- 
oratory, Charleston, S. C, at a cost of $0,025 to $0,032 per sq. yd. 

HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE. 

Expenditures for repairs to drains, sidewalks and roadways were as 
follows : 

Drains - $25,868.31 

Sidewalks: Brick, Concrete, Earth, Flagstone 5,592.28 

Curb 655.75 

Roadways : Sheet Asphalt, Wood Blocks, Vitrified Brick, 

Granite Blocks and Cobbles, Macadam, Plank, Earth .$30,028.21 

Miscellaneous Repairs to streets for Plumbers and Public Service 

Corporations cost $7,698.29, while receipts for this service amounted to 
$8,073.98. 

ROCK CRUSHER 

The cost of operating the Rock Crusher during the year, including 
labor, power, lights, repair parts, etc., was $21,730.58. 

Receipts from sale to paving contractor, of crushed rock and 

screenings to December 31st, 1923, were $43,338.17 

Receipts in January. 1924, for deliveries made in Dec. 1923.... 5,267.70 
Material on hand at Crusher, January 1924: 

Crusher rock, 2,780.17 c. y. at ^3.37 $9,369.17 

Screenings, 1,453.18 c. y. at $1.50 2,179.77 

11,548.94 

GARBAGE COLLECTION 

The following table sets forth the work of the Garbage Collection 
Department, showing the number of loads of garbage hauled per month ; 
the average number of carts working per day, morning and afternoon 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



45 



for each month ; the average number of loads hauled per day, morning 
and afternoon; and the average number of loads per cart per day, 
morning and afternoon for each month. 



1923 


Total 

loads 

Garbage 


Average number 
carts per day 


1 Aver, number 
Average number] loads per cart 
loads per day | per day 


Month 




A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 1 P.M. 


January 

Februar}^ 

March 

April 


5323 
4663 
5350 
5102 
5442 
5219 
5178 
5371 
5183 
5061 
5290 
5038 


28.1 
28.5 
28.0 
27.9 
27.4 
26.7 
27.5 
26.7 
26.0 
28.1 
27.4 
27.8 


20.7 
20.0 
21.4 
22.2 
21.3 
21.7 
22.9 
23.1 
21.8 
22.4 
22.5 
22.6 


110.0 
111.0 
110.7 
112.0 
112.0 
110.5 
114.3 
110.5 
113.4 
119.3 
113.1 
115.6 


87.1 
83.2 
87.4 
92.0 
89.5 
90.2 
92.8 
96.0 
93.8 
91.5 
94.4 
94.3 


3.9 
3.9 
3.9 
4.0 
4.1 
4.1 
4.1 
4.1 
4.3 
4.2 
4.1 
4.1 


4.2 
4.1 
4.0 
4.1 


May 


4.2 


June 


4.1 


July 


4.1 


August 

September .. 

October 

November .. 
December .. 


4.1 
4.3 
4.2 
4.2 
4.1 


Total 


62220 















Total Garbage moved 1922 (Loads 1 cubic yard each) 
Total Garbege moved 1923 (Loads 1 cubic yard each) 



62.344 

62,220 



Loads 1922 more than 1923 124 

The reports of the Dead Animal Contractor show that the fol- 
lowing numer of dead animals was removed during the year : 

Horses Cows Mules Calves Hogs Total 

January 9 3 1 .... .... 13 

February _ 9 2 .... .... 11 

March 4 2 .... .... .... 6 

April „.. 5 2 1 8 

May 2 2 4 

June 3 1 — .... .... 4 

July 4 1 .... 5 

August 10 1 .... .... .... 11 

September 10 .... .... .... .... 10 

October 15 3 18 

November 9 3 .... 12 

December 7 4 1 ..„ 2 14 

Total 87 23 3 1 2 116 

FORAGE 



The prices paid for Hay, Oats and Corn, during the year 1923, 
purchased monthly after due advertisement, were as follows : 

Per bushel Per 100 lbs. Per bushel 

Oats Hay Corn 

January $ .62 $1.18 $1.04 

February .62i/^ 1.16 1.04 

March 68 1.40 

April 67 1.50 

May 69 1.50 

June 69 1.50 



46 Mayor C race's Annual Review 

July 64 1.45 

August 66 1.50 

September 66 1.55 

October 68 1.64 

November 68 1.65 1.38 

December _ 69 1.70 

The cost of Forage per head per month, during 1923, as reported 
by Mr. Joseph L. Broughton, Clerk, City Stables, was as follows: 

January $16.04 

February 15.54 

March 16.90 

April 16.45 

May 16 75 

June 16.75 

July 15.81 

August 16.49 

September 16.72 

October _ 15.91 

November 17.99 

December 17.85 

$199.20 

The average cost per head by month (for year) was $16.60. 

The Expenditures in the Garbage Collection Department were as 
follows : 

Wages— General $35,880.30 

Incinerator 1,092.00 

$36,972.30 

Maintenance 6,151.24 

New Equipment 1,470.00 

Forage 6,357.92 

Total $50,951.46 

STREET CLEANING 

During 1923, the organization for Street Sweeping consisted of : 

Motor Equipment — 1 Elgin Motor Svv'eeper (pick-up) 

1 Elgin Auto Sweeper (for gutter) 
Horse-drawn Equipment — Two 2-horse combination Sprinkler- 
Sweepers. 
Eight dump carts. 
Two foremen. 

Twenty hand-broom laborers. 
Patrol — 15 Patrol sweepers. 

MOTOR SWEEPING REPORT— 1923 

Working Length Area in Gasoline Oil in 

Month Hours in yds. sq. yds. Gallons Quarts 

January 141 183,395.1 2,237,519 239 32 

February — 

March 99 153,552.4 1,833,956 125 24 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 47 

April 129 189,036.4 2,374,339 205 36 

May 24 33,018.9 405,653 30 7 

June 

July 

August 56 73,549.9 1,024.541 90 24 

September 154 214,139.3 2,655,910 215 67 

October 113 163,704.4 2,149.673 160 52 

November 125^ 205,857.4 2,495,632 180 59 

December 120 184,956.1 2,342,952 200 56 

Total 961>^ 1,401,209.9 17,520,175 1444 357 

As reported by Mr. J. J. Mclnerney, Inspector, the horse-drawn 
broom gangs collected, during the year, 12,764 loads (1 cu. yd. each) 
of sweepings, and 912 loads (1 cu. yd. each) of grass. 

The expenditures for Street Sweeping were as follows : 

Wages— General $47,366.80 

Grass Gangs 7,897.85 

$55,264.65 

Maintenance 4,890.14 

Forage 3,178.35 

Sprinkling 475.31 



Total $63,808.45 

A complete list of the equipment, material and supplies, compiled 
by Mr. Joseph Mclnerney, Garbage Inspector, in charge of the City 
Stables, December 31, 1923, is on file in the office of the City Engineer. 



The annual statement of receipts and disbursments as 
prepared by Mr. A. N. Pundt, Chief Clerk and Bookkeeper, 
from the books of Mr. Jacob Williman, former clerk, is as 
follows: 



STREET DEPARTMENT, ANNUAL STATEMENT 

OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

FOR THE YEAR 1923. 

EXPENDITURES 

Scavengering : 

Wages, (General) $35,880.33 

Wages, (Incinerator) $ 1,092.00 

$36,972.33 



Maintenance $ 6,151.24 

New Equipment .-.$ 1,470.00 



$ 7,621.24 
Forage _ $ 6,357.92 



Total Scavengering $50,951.49 



48 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Street Cleaning: 

Wages, (General) $47,366.80 

Wages, (Grass Gang) $ 7,897.85 

$55,264.65 

Maintenance $ 4,890.14 

Forage $ 3,178.35 

Sprinkling $ 475.31 

Total Street Cleaning $63,808.45 

Highway; Maintenance and Repairs: 

Sidewalks $ 5,592.28 

Curbing „ $ 655.75 

Street Paving $19,900.17 

Roadway $10,128.04 

Drains $25,868.31 

Miscellaneous $ 4,018.51 

Lot Account $ 39.15 

General Expenses (including sal- 
ary of clerk; maintenace of auto- 
mobiles ; maintenance and repairs 
motor trucks ; printing and sta- 
tionery ; tools ; claims for dam- 
ages) $10,507.25 . 

Total Highway Repairs $76,709.46 

HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENTS (ABUTTING) 1923 

Includes Sheet Asphalt Paving, Granite Curb, New Drains and 
Concrete Sidewalks, laid on the following Streets : 

America street $ 77Z.72> 

Anson street 15,137.53 

Alexander street „ 25.25 

Ann street 3,621.33 

Amherst street _ 1,203.45 

Bull street 3,897.96 

Burns Lane 928.17 

Bogard street 14,712.43 

Beau fain street 22,821.54 

Bee street 3,614.53 

Calhoun street 16,168.47 

Carolina street 15,149.32 

Charles street _ 3,453.99 

Chisolm street _ l,8o6.72 

Church street 2,371.41 

Cumberland street _ „ 620.11 

Coming street 51,226.93 

Doughty street 2,372.57 

Elizabeth street 15,665.15 

Fishburne street _ 16,294.95 

Grove street 55,566.89 

Hanover street 939.98 

Halsey street 193.92 

Hasell street 42.00 

Horlbeck street 2,050.80 

Huger street 3,865.25 

John street 3,510.95 

King street 23,919.16 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 49 



Legare street 1,860.61 

Lenox street _ 31.90 

Line street 8,448.64 

Logan street 1,527.16 

Lucas street 12,331.80 

Magazine street _ 2,659.50 

Market street (N) 9,659.70 

Mill street 4,814.95 

Montague street _ _ — 1,283.87 

Nassau street »... 1,821.84 

New street 8,689.78 

Ogier street 308.00 

Percy street 7,784.16 

Perry street „ 6.120.12 

Pitt street 1,687.47 

Queen street 18,469.50 

Race street 5,705.11 

Sheppard street 19,961.66 

Simmons street 86.30 

Sires street 2,153.54 

South street 80.00 

State street ..„ 2,425.97 

St. Philip street - 6,137.11 

Sumter street 14,203.10 

Trapman street 2,828.86 

Trumbo street 2,089.78 

Vanderhorst street 21,741.56 

Wall street 2,727.27 

Warren street 20,096.11 

Wilson street „ 1,229.04 

Woolfe street 57.15 

General Asbestos Company 3,927.83 

Special _ „ 21,584.50 



NON-ABUTTING, 1923 

Highway Improvement — Boulevard (roadway) $ 434.35 

Exchange street (new drain) _ 1,492.52 

Halsey street (new curbing) 816.01 



$487,028.48 



$ 2742.88 



RECEIPTS FOR 1923 

Cash Balance from Highway Improvement Ac- 
count from 1922 $ 3,595.42 

Cash Turned over by City Treasurer from 

Abuttment Asessment 1923 1,227.84 

Amount Realized from Tax Assessment for 

Improvements 27,150.32 

Appropriation for Highway Maintenance and 

repairs „ 66,536.36 

Cash received from Plumbers for Miscella- 
neous Repairst to streets 375.69 

Cash received from Sewer Dept 1,173.58 

Cash received from Public Service Corp. Con- 
tractors, etc., for miscellaneous repairs to 
streets etc., for their Account 7.698.28 

Cash received for sale of Crushed Stone from 

Rock Crusher „ . , 43.338.17 



50 Mayor Grace's Ajunial Rnncw 



Cash transferred as unexpended Balance from 

Scavenger Appropriation 4,594.05 

Cash transferred as Unexpended Balance from 

Street Clearing Appropriation 511.99 

Total Cash received for Highway Mainten- 



ance and Repairs $124,183.12 

Appropriation for Scavenger 55,099.36 

Received for Sale of Mules, rent, etc 446.18 



Total _ $ 55,545.54 

Less Cash Balance Transferred to fiighv^ay 

repair _ 4,594.05 



Total Cash received for Scavergering _... $ 50,951.49 

Appropriation for St. Cleaning 63,870.44 

Rec'd from American Spotless St. System for 

Metal Trash Receptacle Concession 450.00 



Total _ $64,320.44 

Less Cash Balance Transferred to Highway 

Repairs 51 1.99 



Total Cash Received for St. Clearing $ 63,808.45 

The Expenditures in Highwa}^ Improvement 
as per Debit side of this Statement were 
total $943,553.90 

The Cash receipt for Improvements were a 

Total of $402,482.20 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 



J. H. DINGLE, 

City Engineer. 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable, The Mayor, The Aldermen 
and City Council of Charleston. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to transmit to you the 29th and final 
annual report of the Board of Sewer Commissioners, as em- 
braced in the comprehensive report of the City Engineer, 
Mr. J. H. Dingle, and with this concludes the function of 
the Commission. 

I have thought it might be of interest to refer to the 
early history of the Sewerage System. In 1893 Hon. John 
F. Ficken, Mayor, instituted inquiry as to measures to re- 
duce the heavy mortality rate in our community. With an 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv - 51 

imperfect water supply, the use of wells and cisterns furn- 
ished water. The privy vaults, by gravitation of their con- 
tents, loaded with intestinal germs, contaminated the under- 
ground cisterns, and the water used carried disease and 
death. Typhoid fever and other preventable diseases pre- 
vailed to an alarming extent. To abolish these conditions 
was a problem. The Board of Sewer Commissioners was 
created and much opposition was encountered — even the 
Municipal Board of Health had objections. The then ex- 
isting Water Company was vehement in its objections, and 
positive as to its inability to furnish water to flush the 
sewers. The local topography presented difficulties, since 
the sub-soil water prevented deep excavation necessary to 
secure proper fall, by gravitation, to discharge the sewage. 
A Topographical Survey was made and a contour map, 
showing the levels and depressions was prepared and is now 
in frequent use for all Civic Engineering purposes. Ex- 
pert Engineers, such as Dr. Rudolph Herring and Mr. 
Samuel Gray were employed and their advice received. 
The several plans and systems were studied, visits to Chi- 
cago and Memphis were made, and the plans adopted in 
the latter city as prepared by Geo. E. Waring, consisting 
of pipes of comparatively small diameter laid at self-cleans- 
ing grades and over small districts, each complete in itself 
and provided with proper apparatus for pumping or lifting 
sewage. In its final analysis, the cost of lifting sewage by 
means of steam pumps was considered excessive, and the 
shone hydropneumatic ejector was employed. Two dis- 
tricts south of Broad Street were constructed. The abolition 
of privy vaults, the dry well and the tank on the roof abated 
the mosquito nuisance, and disease and death rate were 
materially reduced. The sanitary results were quite satis- 
factory. With an improved water supply, Hon. R. G. 
Rhett, as Mayor, took deep interest in the extension of the 
sewers and a bond issue was made to cover the cost of the 
extension of the Sewerage System, and the installation and 
use of electrically driven pumping machinery. The con- 
struction and maintenance of the system were the functions 
of the Sewer Commission, but the sanitary regulations as to 



52 Mayor Grace's Anniud Review 

sewer connections and house plumbing were, by the City 
Ordinance, made the duty of the Board of Health, and the 
obstinate objection of the Board of Health detracted much 
from the sanitary benefit that should have accrued. How- 
ever the indignation of the community was aroused and the 
Chamber of Commerce instituted a Sanitary Survey, and 
assisted materially in the enforcement of the Health 
Ordinance of the City. 

During the World War construction was limited, but 
Mayor John P. Grace secured a Bond Issue, and now the 
beneficial results from the extension of the system well 
justify the expenditure made for the reduction o fdisease, 
for comfort, for convenience and for improved sanitary 
conditions generally. The enforcement of City Ordinance 
however, by The Board of Health is very essential. 

Respectfully submitted, 
T. GRANGE SIMONS, M. D. 
Chairman Board of Sewer Commissioners. 



CITY ENGINEER'S OFFICE 



Charleston, S. C, February 1st, 1924. 

Dr. T. Grange SiniGns, Chairman, 

Board of Sewer Commissioners, 
Charleston, S. C, 

Dear Sir : 

I have the honor to submit the twenty-ninth Annual Re- 
port of the Sewer Department concerning the operation and 
maintenance of the sewerage system during the year 1923. 

Sezver Connections — Total permits issued during 1923, 
366. 

This number includes connections laid by City from main 
sewer to curb line at time of construction of sewerage and 
charged to property holders at $15.00 each as follows: — 

43 connections at $15.00 $645.00 

The total number of connections laid by city and utilized 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 53 

and paid for by property holders since construction of sew- 
erage system is — 

1816 connections at 15.00 $27,240.00 

The cost of maintaining and operating the system was as 
follows '. — 

EXPENDITURES— SEWER DEPARTMENT— 1923 

Labor: Electrician $ 2,080.00 

Electrician 1,248.00 

Power House Engr 1,500.00 

Power House Fireman 918.00 

Labor East Side 1,396.30 

Labor West Side 1,086.70 

Labor Power House 82.90 

$ 8,311.90 

Office: Printing and Stationery 2.90 

Power House : Coal $ 370.80 

Kerosine 5.20 

Lubricating Oil 24.90 

Grate Bars 31.65 

Albany grease 1.60 

Lumber 30.33 

. Roofing 9.75 

Supplies 94.06 

Machine Shop Work 105.84 

Ice 14.40 

688.53 

Pump-Pits: Electric Current $ 2,241.42 

Machine shop work & parts 2,072.88 

Kerosine - 1.70 

Lubricating oil 27.25 

Albany grease 12.50 

Boots 13.00 

Repair fences 28.80 

Miscellaneous _ 7.78 

Supplies 172.91 

4,578.24 

System : Hose _ 65.40 

Miscellaneous: Funeral Exp. Employee $ 201.00 

Damage to private sewers 33.50 

234.50 

Secretary : ^ 300.00 

$14,181.47 

Balance _ 1,482.53 

TOTAL APPROPRIATION $15,664.00 

Sewerage Extension. 

In 1922, bids were invited for extension of the sewerage 
system, but, before a decision had been reached, the lowest 
bidder withdrew his bid, a proceeding concerning the legali- 



54 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviczv 

ty of which there was considerable doubt on the part of the 
City authorities. In January 1923, the extension of the 
sewerage system was commenced by day labor and con- 
tinued until May, 1923, when a contract was signed with 
the Charleston Engineering & Contracting Company for 
the continuation and completion of the work. From Jan- 
uary to May (both inclusive) 1923, the following amounts 
were expended : — 

EXPENDITURES— SEWERAGE EXTENSION— DAY LABOR 
JANUARY Mi to MAY 5th, 1923 

Lafeor— Foreman @ $60.00 per week _..., $ 995.00 

• Time-keeper @ $30 per week „ 270.00 

Brick layer 45.42 

Laborers, @ 15c, 17^c & 20c per hr 2,907.09 

Team _ 22.50 

$ 4.240.01 

Sewer Pi>^ :— Material „ $ 7,189.26 

" Freight 1,093.44 

8.282.70 



Cement 103.70 

Sand 28.00 

Miscellaneous Lumber, including wedges 40.05 



171.75 



Equipment including power and hand pumps, boots 

mauls, pile-caps, plank puller, yarning 

irons, etc 1,631.60 

Lumber 1,287.77 

100 Manhole Steps $ "23.25 

Nails, Grease, Oakum, etc 160.45 



183.70 

Repairs to pumps „ 8.50 

Printing and Stationery _ 75.00 

Liability Bond 159.73 



Total __ „ $16,040.76 

The accepted bid for Sewer Pipe was as follows : 

Chattanooga Sewer Pipe Works: — 

30 inch Double Strength Pipe, per foot - $ 3.445 

30 inch Double Strength Wye, apiece 15.75 

27 inch Double Strength Pipe, per foot ~ 2.65 

27 inch Double Strength Wye, apiece - 12.60 

10 inch Standard Pipe, per foot 338 

10 inch Standard Wye, apiece 1.69 

8 inch Standard Pipe, per foot 25 

8 inch Standard Wye, apiece 1.25 

6 inch Standard Pipe, per foot 15 

6 inch Caps, apiece - .06 

The day labor forces constructed on Grove street, between Tenth 
and Eleventh streets the following: — 

27 inch T. C. sewer, cut 9 ft. to 11 ft 120.0 ft. 

11 ft. to 13 ft 364.5 ft. 

484.5 ft. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reznezv 55 

Manholes, 5 ft. diameter, cut 9 ft. to 11 ft 1 

Manholes, 5 ft. diameter, cut 11 ft. to 13 ft „ 1 

When it was decided to discontinue the day labor method and to 
contract with Charleston Engineering & Contracting Co., the contractor 
agreed to take over the material, supplies and equipment which the 
Department had provided, and a bill was rendered the contractor as 
follows : — 

Sewer Pipe $ 6,693.32 

Equipment and Supplies 1,946.29 

$ 8,639.61 

After conferences and correspondence, the Department accepted 
the Contractors offer, as follows : — 

Sewer Pipe „ $ 6,315.97 

Equipment and Supplies 1,803.69 

— $ 8,119.65 

One-half difference between Contractor's and 

Department's account ...„ 260.00 

$ 8,379 66 

In addition to this credit f(;r material and supplies delivered to 
the Contractor, the Street Department took over some material for 
which the Contractor had no ne(;d, to the amount of $410.20. 

So that the amounts charged to construction should be as follows : 

Total expenditures $16,040.76 

Credit from Contractor $ 8,379.66 

Credit from Street Department ~ 410.20 

$ 8,789.80 

Cost of work $ 7,250.96 

The Contract with the Charleston Engineering and Contracting 
Company specifies the following prices : — 

("Depth" indicates distance from flow-line to under surface of 
pavement or to surface of ground where there is no pavement.) 

Vitrified Pipe Sewers, per lineal eoot. 

30^' Double strength: — 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft _ $ 7.525 

Pepth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 8.33 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 8.98 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 11.13 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 15.80 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft 16.125 

27'''' Double strength : — 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft $ 6.18 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 6.99 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft. 7.525 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 9.41 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 11.825 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft 12.90 

24''^ Double strength : — 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft $ 4.35 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 5.05 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 5.64 



56 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 7.525 

Depth over 13 ft. to and inckiding 15 ft 9.675 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft - 10.21 

22'^Donhle strength : — 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft $ 3.92 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 4.57 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 5.11 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 6.99 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 9.14 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft 9.675 

21^' Double strength : — 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft $ 3.92 

Depth over 7 ft to and including 9 ft 4.57 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 5.11 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 6.99 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 9.14 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft 9.675 

18^' Double Strength:— 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft $ 2.85 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 3.49 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 3.92 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 5.375 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 7.525 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft 7.79 

15'' Pipe :— 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft $ 2.15 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 2.69 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 3.225 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 4.84 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 6.45 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft _ 6.72 

12'' Pipe :— 

Depth over 3 ft. to and including 5 ft $ 1.29 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft 1.61 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 2.42 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 2.69 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 4.03 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 5.375 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft 5.91 

10" Pipe :— 

Depth over 3 ft. to & including 5 ft $ 1.13 

Depth over 5 ft. to & including 7 ft 1.45 

Depth over 7 ft. to & including 9 ft 2.15 

Depth over 9 ft. to & including 11 ft 2.53 

Depth over 11 ft. to & including 13 ft _ 3.76 

Depth over 13 ft. to & including 15 ft 5.11 

8" Pipe :— 

Depth over 3 ft. to & including 5 ft $ 0.97 

Depth over 5 ft. to & including 7 ft 1.34 

Depth over 7 ft. to & including 9 ft 1.88 

Depth over 9 ft. to & including 11 ft 2.15 

Depth over 11 ft. to & including 13 ft 3.225 

Depth over 13 ft. to & including 15 ft 4.84 

Depth over 15 ft. to & including 17 ft 5.375 

6" Pipe:— 

Depth over 1 ft. to & including 3 ft _ $ 0.43 

Depth over 3 ft. to & including 5 ft 0.54 

Depth over 5 ft. to & including 7 ft 0.81 

Depth over 7 ft. to & including 9 ft. ....„., _ 1.34 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 57 

Depth over 9 ft. to & including 11 ft 1.61 

Depth over 11 ft. to & including 13 ft 1.88 

Depth over 13 ft. to & including 15 ft „ 2.15 

Additional for substituting Cast Iron Pipe for Terra Cotta Pipe, if 

ordered, per lineal foot. 

24 Inch Cast Iron Pipe, (225 lbs.) $ 5.375 

20 Inch Cast Iron Pipe, (175 lbs.) 4.84 

18 Inch Cast Iron Pipe, (150 lbs.) 4.30 

16 Inch Cast Iron Pipe, (125 lbs.) 3.76 

12 Inch Cast Iron Pipe, ( 75 lbs.) 1.77 

10 Inch Cast Iron Pipe, ( 60 lbs.) _ 1.40 

8 Inch Cast Iron Pipe, ( 45 lbs.) 1.075 

6 Inch Cast Iron Pipe, ( 30 lbs.) 0.75 

Bottom Plank, with accompanying mudsills, wedges and additional ex- 
cavation, per lineal foot, Sheet No. 1. 

2 inch X 12 inch @ $ 0.19 

3 inch X 12 inch @ 0.27 

4 inch X 8 inch (doubled) @ 0.38 

Concrete Bed for Terra Cotta Pipe, if ordered, per lineal foot. Sheet 

No. 1. 

30 inch Pipe @ $ 2.69 

27 inch Pipe, @ 2.15 

24 inch Pipe @ „ 1.88 

22 inch Pipe @ 1.34 

20 inch Pipe @ 1.34 

18 inch Pipe @ 1.34 

Pile Foundation for Pipe, if ordered, per lineal foot of foundation. 
Sheet No. 2, Sketch No. 1. 

Using Piles 10^ below cut-off @ $ 1.72 

Using Piles 15' below cut-off @ 1.88 

Using Piles 20' below cut-off (S) _ 2.04 

Using Piles 25' below cut-off (S) 2.20 

Pile Foundation for Pipe, if ordered, per lineal foot of foundation. 
Sheet No. 2, Sketch No. 2. 

Using Piles 10^ below cut-off (a) $ 1.67 

Using Piles 15' below cut-off @ 1.83 

Using Piles 20' below cut-off @ 1.99 

Using Piles 25' below cut-off @ 2.15 

Manholes, 4 ft. diam. complete with castings, per M. H. Sheet No. 1 

Depth over 3 ft. to and including 5 ft $ 64.50 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft 69.88 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 75.25 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 86.00 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 107.50 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 134.38 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft 134.38 

Manholes, 5 ft. diam. complete with castings, per M. H. Sheet No. 1. 

Depth over 3 ft. to and including 5 ft $ 69.88 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft 75.25 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 80.625 

Depth over 9 ft. to and including 11 ft 91.375 

Depth over 11 ft. to and including 13 ft 118.25 

Depth over 13 ft. to and including 15 ft 161.25 

Depth over 15 ft. to and including 17 ft 161.25 

Pile Foundation for Manholes or Flush Tanks, if ordered, per foun- 
dation. Sheet No. 2. 

Using piles 10 ft. below cut-off ^ 43.00 

Using piles 15 ft. below cut-off 44.075 



58 Mavor Grace's Annual Review 



Using piles 20 ft. below cut-off 46.225 

Using piles 25 ft below cut-off 48.375 

Flush Tanks, complete with castings, hut not including water service, 
per Flush Tank, Sheet No. 1. 

Depth over 3 ft. to and including 5 ft $107.50 

Depth over 5 ft. to and including 7 ft 112.875 

Depth over 7 ft. to and including 9 ft 118.25 

Taking up asphalt pavement, including concrete base 

per sq. yd : $ 0.27 

Taking up Granite Block Paving & Piling blocks in gutter, 

per sq. yd 0.09 

Take up Concrete Sidewalks, and pile slabs clear of work, 

per sq. yd 0.54 

Removing old Sewer in order to substitute larger pipe at lower grade. 

Per lineal foot 0.27 

Removing Old Manholes $10.75 

Sheath Piling left in place, if ordered, per M. ft. B. M 21.50 

Extra Concrete, if ordered, per cu. yd 16.125 

Extra Brick Work, if ordered, per cu. yd 16.125 

Extra Lumber for Foundation, if ordered per M. ft. B. M 26.875 

Extra Excavation, if ordered, per cu. yd 2.69 

Furnish and lay water service from corporation cock on main to inside 

of Flush Tank, per lineal foot, 0.70 

Furnish and set cock with nozzle inside of flush tank, 

per cock and nozzle, 2.69 

Taps in water main including corporation cock, 

per tap cock 2.26 

Cutting opening in old manholes, for connection with nezu sewer 5.375 
From April to December 31, 1923 the following amounts were ex- 
pended for contract work Sewerage Extension. 

Inspectors $ 4,193.33 

Charleston Engineering and Contracting C., Contract 56,091.90 

Miscellaneous (Advertising, Printing Sewer Bonds, etc.) 619.90 

Take up and haul old 10''''xl2'''' cast iron discharge pipe from 
Aiken, Cooper and Drake Sts., to Grove St., and to stor- 
age and to lay discharge line on Grove St 8,038.72 

12'' valve for by-pass Grove St., 3 12'' 45 Bends _ :. 150.27 

Cinders for back fill Drake St 180.00 

Total - - $69,274.17 

The discharge from the pump stations at Lee and Aiken Streets, 
and at Drake and South Streets which formerly emptied at east end of 
Calhoun Street, having, some years ago, been changed so as to empty 
into Vardell's Creek and east end of Reid Street reducing the cost of 
pumping and of maintenance of long line of discharge pipe, it was 
determined to recover the 10" and 12" discharge pipe thereby rendered 
useless and to remove this pipe from Aiken, Cooper and Drake Streets. 
The 12" pipe was hauled to Grove St., and there laid as a discharge 
line for the new pumping station, the 10" pipe was stored. The con- 
tract prices were as follows: 

Taking up and hauling 10" and 12" cast iron discharge pipe Aiken, 
Cooper and Drake Streets and laying 12" discharge on Grove St., J. 
H. James, Contractor, August 30, 1922. 

Depths of pipe below level of street 
Feet Feet Feet Feet 
0-3 3-5 5-7 7-9 



Mayo7' Grace's Annual Review 59 

Take up and haul 10" cast iron pipe 

to Lee St. lot per foot .52 .62 

Take up and haul 12-''' cast iron pipe 

to Lee St. lot per foot 62 .82 

Take up and haul 12'''' cast iron pipe 

to Grove St. per foot .65 .85 

Lay 12'''' cast iron pipe Grove St. 

per foot 84 .89 $L18 $1.76 

Mud-sills per M. ft. B. M. in place, $50.00^ 

The work of extending the sewers is still in progress. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. DINGLE 

City Engineer. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

January 1st, 1924 

To the Honorable, the Mayor 

and City Council of Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : — 

I have the honor to submit this, my Annual Report, 
with the Meteriological observations and tables of Vital 
Statistics, also reports of the varous departments under the 
supervision of the Board of Health, showing the work 
which has been undertaken for the general benefit of the 
City, during the year 1923. 

Our general death rate is a little higher than for 1922, 
which year was the lowest on record. We cannot hope for 
a decline each year, but we do want to reach a low stand- 
ard, from which there may be slight variations each year 
and that standard to compare with any in the Country. 

There is good cause for congratulation as to our lowered 
mortality which has come about in the last few years, and 
our desire is to center on matters which directly affect the 
public health, and make Charleston a place where people will 
come to seek health. 

We have had a decrease in Typhoid Fever with a slight 
increase in Diphtheria, with Scralet Fever practically the 
same. 

An Epidemic of Measles for the last 3 months of the 



60 Mayor Grace's .'hniual Rrviciv 

year, made its appearance. The mortality from same has 
been nei^li<;ible. 

A sli<^ht outbreak of Diphtheria occurred in a section 
of the City, but strict isolation of- the cases and prompt 
dealing- with the carriers and contacts, soon controlled the 
situation. 

Two hundred treatments of Toxin-Antitozin were pur- 
chased, and all were used up in a short time. Another two 
hundred were purchased, making in all 400 treatments 
have been furnished so far. 

Up to date, there have been 118 immunized against Diph- 
theria. All records are being kept. While this is but a 
small proportion of children immunized against Diphtheria, 
still it is a beginning and we hope to increase the number 
greatly this coming yeiu'. 

It is a duty incumbent upon every parent to have their 
children immunized against Diphtheria. Nights of anguish 
and anxiety may be saved, and above all, children can be 
prevented from contracting this dreaded disease, by three 
(3) harmless injections of toxin-Antitoxin. 

For the control of Contagious Diseaases, we have had 
printed new ''Rules and Regulations, governing both the 
''Carrier" and also the Frank cases, and contacts. These 
are sent out to each case as reported and instructions given 
by our Nurse, who supervises the case from a public health 
standpoint. We have no Contagious Disease Hospital, and 
in lieu of this, this system seems to work well and the cases 
and carriers seem to be under better control than formerly. 
Of course we sometimes have trouble and always will until 
such a time as an Isolation Hospital is established, and we 
can send cases there. Home Quarantine or isolation, is 
for the most part a make shift, and can never afford that 
public health protection which is furnished by an Isolation 
Hospital. 

In view of the fact that the Bureau of Municipal Research 
has been employed by City Council to make investigations 
and plan a re-organization of this Department, I will with- 
hold in this report any suggestions or recommendations for 
1924. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 61 

MORTALITY. 

Population for 1923 (Official.) 

White 38,403 

Colored 32,842 

Total 71,246 

Ratio per 1,000 white : 11.08 

Ratio per 1,000 colored 30.10 

Ratio per 1,000 white and colored. 20.00 

Number of Deaths 

White 454 

Colored 989 

Total 1,443 

Stillbirths excluded. U. S. Census July 1, 1923. 

The reason for the increased mortality for Charleston, is due 
to the fact that we have included in our death rate, deaths from all 
causes, with the exception of Stillbirths. This is done for 1923 in 
order to accord with the standard of all other cities. 



TRANSMISSIBLE DISEASES. 
TYPHOID FEVER. 

No. Cases Deaths 

White .._ 36 imported 4 40 White 3 

Colored 22 imported 4 24 Colored 6 

Total 58 imported 8 66 Total 8 

DIPHTHERIA. 

No. Cases Deaths 

White 50 imported 1 51 White 2 

Colored 5 imported 5 Colored 

Total 55 imported 4 59 Total 2 

i 

SCARLET FEVER. 

No. Cases Deaths 

White 39 imported 1 40 White 1 

Colored 2 imported 2 Colored 

Total 41 imported 1 42 Total ^ I 



62 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

TUBERCULOSIS 

The number of deaths from Tuberculosis was: 

White 19 

Colored 89 

Total 108 

PELLAGRA. 

There have been deaths as follows: 

White 2 

Colored 21 

Total ' 23 

SMALL-POX. 

No. Cases Deaths 

White White 

Colored 4 Colored 

Total 4 Total 

In 1922, we had but 1 case of Small~Pox. An error in printing 
gives us 191. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR YEAR OF 1923. 

Appropriation Expenditures 

A.uto upkeep, Health Officer ..$ 200.00 $ 199.01 

Salary, Bacteriologist 1,800.00 1,800.00 

Slundry, Supplies Bacteriologist 700.00 677.21 

Salary, Clerk 1,800.00 1,800.00 

Contagious Diseases 3,000.00 1,132.83 

Disinfectants 500.00 486.98 

Salary, Chief Food Inspector 2,400.00 2,400.00 

Salary (2) Asst. Food Inspectors 2,400.00 2,400.00 

Supplies and Telephones, Food Dept 350.00 146.13 

Salary Health Officer 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Salary, Public Health Nurse 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Telephone 12.60 12.60 

Printing and Stationery 500.00 509.02 

Salary, Chief Sanitary Inspector 1,800.00 1,800.00 

Salary, (8) Sanitary Inspectors 8,640.00 8,640.00 

Salary, Stenographer 720.00 720.00 

Salary, Veterinarian 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Office Expense 200.00 134.47 

Salary Clinic Physician 100.00 100.00 

Salary Asst. Bacteriologist 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Auto upkeep. Public Health Nurse 300.00 299.82 

Auto upkeep, Chief Food Inspector 200.00 200.00 

Sewerage, City Property 147.00 147.00 

Rent of Laboratory 300.00 300.00 

$34,269.60 $32,105.07 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 



63 



Total Appropriation $34,269.60 

Total Expenditures 32,105.07 

Unappropriated Balance $2,164.63 

To Income Account of City from Milk Licenses _ 289.00 

To Income Account of City from Over Paying Bill 5.50 

$2,459.03 

A. P. AIMAR, Chairman J. Merceir Green, M. D. 

Board of Health Health Officer 



REPORT OF BACTERIOLOGIST 



Dr. J . Merceir Green, 

Health Officer, 
City. 

My dear Doctor: — 

I herewith have the hoonor to report work in the City 
Laboratory during the Year 1923. 

POS. NEG. Total 



Blood for Widal Keaction. 

Blood for Para Reaction 

Blood for Plas. Malaria 



Sputums for Pneumococci 

Sputums for B. Tuberculosis 

Sputums for Special Organisms. 



Cultures for B. Diphtheria 
Cultures for Misc. Organs- 
Cultures for Staphylococci 
Cultures for B. Tyhosus ... 



Pus Smears for D. Gonnoccocci 

Pus Smears for B. Koch Weeks 

Pus Smears for Morax-Axenfields. 



Feces for Uncinaria Americans. 
Feces for Ascaris Lumbricoides. 

Feces for Taenia Solim 

Feces for Amoeba Hist 



Water for Coli Group. 
Milk for Routine 



51 


8 


409| 
126 

242 

1 


12 

37 




1 

61 

160| 

3 


86 
3 
2 



889 

10 

2 

2 


55 
1 
1 


350 




8 
1 
1 



113 


2 







460 
126 
250 

18 

197 

3 

975 

19 

4 

2 

405 

1 
1 

121 
1 
1 
2 

33 

410 



64 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Laboratory Work— Cont. POS. NEG. Total 



Dogs for Hydrophobia 

Urines for Charity 

Miscellaneous Examinations 

Guinea Pig Inoc, Charity 

Vaccines for Charity 



11 



12 

78 

89 

5 

2 



Total 3212 

Yours very truly, 

Bacteriologist to Board. 



REPORT FOOD INSPECTOR 
January 1, 1924. 

Dr. J . Merccir Green, Health Officer, 
Charleston, S. C. 

Dear Sir : — 

I herewith submit to you my Annual Report for the year 
ending Dec. 31st, 1923. 

You will probably note that the condemnations for this 
year are not as great as those of the past year, but I attribute 
this to the fact that the merchants are inclined to co-operate 
with us in our work. 

You will also note that while our milk supply has varied 
as to the number of Bacteria, you will find that our average 
is within the prescribed ordinance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. H. BOLD, M. D. 

Chief Food Inspector. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 
TABLE No. 1. 



65 



INSPECTIONS. 



Abbatoir 414 

Meat Markets 676 

Fish Markets 97 

Packing HouSes 155 

Sausage Plants 143 

Fruit Stores -. 960 

Bakeries 441 

Restaurants 840 

Grocery Stores 4,454 

Soda Fountains 528 

Sotf Drink and Bottle Est..-2,282 



Candy Mfg. Plants 76 

Ice Cream Plants 63 

Bottling Plants 34 

Lunches 25 

Vegetables Stalls 44 

Cookshops 361 

Special Inspections 60 

Mutton Killed 1,067 

Hogs Killed 7,872 

Beef Killed 8,627 



TABLE No, 2. 



FOODSTUFF CONDEMNED. 



Oranges Doz. 201 

Apples Doz. 347 

Bananas Doz. 62 

Lemons Doz. 38 

Tomatoes Doz. 330 

Grape Fruit Doz. 29 

Pears Doz 49 

Bell Peppers Doz. 3 

Eggs Doz. 31/2 

Watermelons Doz. 8 

Peaches Doz. 119 

Canteloupes Doz. 23^/^ 

Plums, California....Doz. 3 

Fried Fish Doz. 1 

Loaves Bread Doz. 7^/^ 

Dried Fruit Lbs. 25 

Currants Lbs. 16 

Dates Lbs. 12 

Grapes Lbs. 121 

Candy Lbs. 38 

Raisins Lbs. 50 

Lima Beans Lbs. 8 

Cabbage Lbs. 30 

Figs Lbs. 31 

Prunes Lbs. 10 

Biscuits Lbs. 5 

Chocolate Bars Lbs. 5 

Cake Lbs. 10 

Cheese Lbs. 5 

Cranberreis Lbs. 20 

Hamburger Siteak ..Lbs. 5 

Bacon Lbs. 5 

Pork Loins Lbs. 300 

Ham Lbs. 69 



Liver .Lbs. 18,000 

Sausage Lbs. 64 

Meat Lbs. 2,510 

Potatoes Lbs. 380 

Carrots Pk. 1 

Onions Bu. 2l^ 

Sweet Potatoes Bu. 1% 

Lettuce Heads 14 

Carrots Bunches 4 

Radishes Bunches 4 

Cocoanuts '. 7 

Persimmons 8 

Fish 6 

Mackerel 5 

Fish Cans 35 

Pineapples Cans 5 

Vegetablies Cans 35 

Pork and Beans ....Cans 28 

Sardines Cans 127 

Salmon Cans 50 

Tomatoes Cans 71 

Tomatoes, Cans Doz. 133% 

Peaches, Cans 2-lb. each 24 
55 Cases 1-lb. Salmon, 

Cans 2,640 

300 Cases Soda Water, 

Tryme Bot. 7,200 

Bell Peppers Basket 1 

Plums Quarts 4 

Cows 5 

Hogs 1 

Mixed Pickles Jars 18 

Mustard Jars 20 

Fruit Jelly Jars 8 



66 



Mavor Grace's Annual Review 



TABLE No. 3. 

Condemnation of Milk: 

Total Milk Condemned, 8 quarts, 1 pint; Chocolate Milk, half- 
dozen bottles; Ice Cream, 23 quarts. 

Police Court Prosecutions: 

Summons to Court, 2; Convicted with i^lO.OO fiines, 1. 

AVERAGE OF MILK TESTS FOR 1923. 

Number Average Average 

Name of Dairy of Average Specific Total Average 

Tests Fats Gravity Solids Bacteria 

Martins 12 4.1 1.029 12.35 20,112 

Charleston 51 3.5 1.029 1L51 69,823 

Farmfields 48 3.8 1.030 12.23 26,827 

West End 51 3.6 1.029 11.81 25,710 

Rephan 50 8.8 1.029 12.09 50,148 

Coburg 52 4.0 1.030 12.50 14,398 

Barkerding 52 3.5 1.028 11.72 59,268 

Battery 52 3.6 1.029 11.83 45,145 

GRADE OF MERIT. 

Highest Highest Lowest 

Name of Dairy Fats Total Solids Bacteria 

Martins 1st 2nd 2nd 

Charleston 5th 8th 8th 

Farmfield 3rd 3rd 4th 

West End 4th 6th 3rd 

Rephan 3rd 4th 6th 

Coburg 2nd 1st 1st 

Barkerding 5th 7th 7th 

Battery 4th 5th 5th 



SANITARY DIVISION 



January 1, 1924. 



Dr. J. Merceir Green, 
Health Officer, 

Charleston, 



S.C. 



Dear Sir : — 



I have the honor to submit this my Annual Report for 
the Division of Sanitary Inspection for the Year ending 
December 31st, 1923. 

During the year. Eighty-four thousand five hundred and 
Nin-ety-six (84,596) visits to premises were made as against 
Seventy-five thousand one hundred and seventy-seven (75,- 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 67 

177) for the year 1922. An increase of nine thousand four 
hundred and ninet-een (9,419) visits. 

This Department co-operated to th-eir full extent with 
the Plumbing Inspector and the Engineer Department in 
locating drains that were connected with the sewer, im- 
mediately notifying the owner to make the connection. 

On the streets that have been paved as also on the streets 
that are not complete, the Plumbing Inspector personally 
visited with me and in all cases we have gotten in touch 
with the owners, and those that did not connect with sewer 
at once assured us that they would do so. 

In regards to taking cases to the Recorder's Court, it 
is with much pleasure that I report that during the year I 
had very little occasion to resort to that unpleasant duty, as 
in most cases when I saw the parties concerned and explain- 
ed matters, they readily complied with the law. 

Constant attention was paid to places that are regarded 
as bad and all Inspectors reported regularly on conditions 
as they found them and owners were notified to correct or 
personally appealed to, for such cleaning up as was neces- 
sary. 

All cow stables which are ver)'- few are found to comply 
with regulations. 

Some little trouble arose from time to time with negro 
owners of horses, this being sloppy yards most of the 
trouble being in bad weather and same was only of a few 
days duration or until a few of dry weather. 

Regarding dogs that are owned by negroes, I want to 
call to your attention the menace they are to the Inspectors 
who have to make inspections in congested negro sections ; 
they are of the meanest type and most every negro has a 
dog, in many cases I have counted a dozen where as a 
matter of fact there was not enough accommodations for 
the sleeping of as many persons. These same dogs are 
responsible for much of the garbage that is scattered on the 
streets in that they turn cans on their sides eating whatever 



68 Mayor (j race's Ajuiiia! Revieiv 

is edible and literally covering- the streets with what they 
cannot eat. In this connection let me add that none of the 
owners of dogs of this type pay any taxes, in fact as I 
understand it, there is no city tax on dogs. There is how- 
ever, a county tax that if same is not paid at the required 
time, the owner of such dog is rec[uired to pay a fine and 
I am satisfied they will not pay the fine, therefore I feel that 
if the Inspectors are instructed to make this report the com- 
munity will be rid of one of its worse pests. 

In my report last year I recommended a more direct co- 
operation with the Street Department regarding the garbage 
containers. In some of the better communities, householders 
are as lax regarding containers, as the very poor people. 
We have done and are doing our utmost to make house 
holders comply with the law in this respect but as I recom- 
mended last year I feel the only solution is that garbage con- 
tainers not in keeping with the law be taken away as gar- 
bage and drivers of scavenger carts be instructed to do so. 

As heretofore the Inspector in the First District kept 
after owners of vacant Boulevard lots to keep down weeds 
and grass and it is a pleasure to report how few vacant lots 
there are that gave us much trouble during the past summer. 

Again I recommend that Inspectors in the upper or 
Northern part of the city be allowed car tickets. 

Please find attached tabulation of year's work on follow- 
ing page. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE HARTNETT, 

Chief Sanitary Inspector. 





trt- 


May 07' G 

S O O O p3 ^ 


yacc's Annual Reviezv 

S'^S.-o-^ MONTHS 
. . . ^. . 


— 


en 
05 


OTOsciasasooooooooocsoi 
co4i-toa50ocnooi-'boo:>oo 
ocooco4^co^^~a*:'0ol-'to 

CD•<I00^P^C^00O00^-^00C0C^^ 


No. Premises 
Inspected 


00 


►Pi.a5CriCn4^tOCOCn4^Cnhf^tO 
tO^(^C0t0^t^r-^4^^-^^-l^-CIC^^ 


Garbage 


o 

a 

2 
1 

n 

s, 

ffi 

B 

f 

M 
O 


Oi 

00 

00 


4:xvfi.ciCOC5:OCO~qcr)OOO^F^ 

coh-^h-ioo-ai-icoooastooaj 


Notices Served 




to 

o 
o 


M to HA to to 4^ 

<joo<j<;oooto05too<io:>oo 


Drains 




CO 

to 


tOtOtOtOtOtOCO,ji.COC04i-l-i 

ocotoociH-^cDh-icoco~q-^ 


Vai^lts 


CO 
00 


H-itOtOtOCOCOl-itOCnCOt-itO 

^^co4:^o<^too<X)c^'X)<X)^-* 


No. Vaults 
Cleaned 


Gi 


i i i i : i oco^tooo 


Cisterns 


00 


I i i : CO i : : : i : i 


Low Lots 


CD 


H* to h-^ 

cooicorfi-toOTCotoascnMCi 


Other Nuisances 


to 

en 


(-ii-itOi*>'to(-*H-itoh-i; 

h-iCOCOCDOSH-'OOOOCOOCOOO 


Complts. to Office 


O 


oocncn-qosooh-ioOMOi-q 
MOcni-'t^-qcyscni-iCDOOCo 


Corrected 


H* 






HI 










Recorder's Court 


H* 






HA 










Fined 




















Released 






i i i i 














Diphtheria 




















Scarlet Fever 




















Small-Pox 




















Diphtheria 


















Scarlet Fever 


— 


















Small-Pox 
















Tuberculosis 




















Typhoid Fever 


CO 


h-'tOtOtO^^.COCOtOtOl-^MM' 
000-qOOtO~qtO-q-<J004i-<] 
rfi-oajOcnfP^~qcnootoooco 


Places supplied 
withDisinfectants 










^ 


i : H-i : 


CO en 4^ to en o:. O 


Flush Toilets 
Installed 


I-* 




: CO 4s^ 


HA Oi O 


Notice to 
Destroy Vaults 


(-1 


H-i h-A l-i M h-A to 4^- 
rf^OOI-^COrf:^COOCOOiCO-:]00 


Sewer Con- 
nections Made 




': i i 
: ; M : 


i to*f^ to HA oi o 


Old Vaults 
Destroyed 


I-* 


1 1 1 
; : o: 




HAOOOO 


Complied with 
Law at Re- 
corder's Court 


g 

G 


MI-i|-i|-iH-i|-itOI-AtOtOtOM- 
COOtOrfi^COrf^OOOOOCOCO 
00-qtOC54i»4i^-ClCOHAt-iOOCn 


Reinspections 
Made 


CO 


t-i HA (-1 M l-i HA HA to to HA 
O5CnC!5CO4i.tOO5C0O50000CO 


Flush Toilets 
Reported 


( 


J1 


l-i M M HA ^ 
•qCO *». 00>) 


^ H^ C 


HA t 

J1 tOh 


O 1- 


a 
DC 


oE 







No. Corrected 



69 



70 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

After The Bertiixon Ci.asssification op Causes op Deaths, 
International Decenniae Revision, Paris, 1900. 
Deaths eor the Year 1923. 



First 



GENERAL DISEASES 




V) 

B 


o 


SH 

(_ 

o 
o 
O 


B 

<u 
l-l 

o 


1 





1. Typhoid F., Abdominal Typhus... 

2. Eranthematic Typhus 

3. Fever, Recurrent 


2 


1 


3 


2 5 


7 


10 


4. Fever, Intermittent 








1 


3 


4 


4 


5. Small-Pox 










6. Measles 










3 


3 


3 


7. Fever, Scarlet 




1 

2 
1 
5 


1 
3 
2 
9 




1 


8. Whooping Cough 


1 
1 

4 


4 


3 


7 


10 


9. Diphtheria and Croup 


2 


10. Influenza 


7 


9 


16 


25 


11. Fever, Miliary _ 

12. Asiatic Cholera 




13. Cholera Nostros 
















14. Dysentery 










2 


21 


2 


15. Plague 

16. Fever, Yellow 












17. Leprosy 
















18. Erysipelas 
















19. Other Epidemic Diseases 










1 

I 4 


1 

1 6 


1 


20. Pyemia and Septicaemia 

21. Glanders 








I 2 


I 6 


22. Anthrax 

23. Rabies 


















24. Actinomycosis Trichinosis 

25. Pellagra 


"ii 


■"8 


1 

2! 


"V? 


-■- 


"271 


29 


26. Tuberculosis of Larynx 

27. Tuberculosis of Lungs 


II I I 

1911 301 371 
II I 

II 11 

II 1 


1 

67| 86 


28. Tuberculosis of Meninges 

29. Tuberculosis of Abdominal 

30. Potts Disease 


II 

Ill 1 
II ." 


31. Cold Abscess 


I 




11 






32. White Swelling 

33. Tuberculosis of other Organs 

34. Tuberculosis General 


1 

1 

1 


"i 


II 

Ill 11 

111 81 

If 1 


....„ 
11 


"'211 3 

1911 51ft 


35. Scrofula 


(1 




36. Syphilis 


11- 
I. 





111 Rl 


8 


1611 
11- 


17 


37. Gonorrhoea, Adults 

38. Gonococcal Affection of Infants. 

Carried Forward I 


I- 

1. 

I 

1 




I. 





Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv 



71 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

A^ER The Bertiw^on Classsipication of Causes of Deaths, First 

Internationai. Decennial Revision, Paris, 1900. 

Deaths eor the Year 1923. 



GENERAL DISEASES— Continued. 




en 


CO 

1 


to 

:^ 

U 


tn 

ca 
E 

1 
o 
'o 


I 


} 

o 

1 


Brought Forward 

39. Cancer and Other Maligant Tu- 
mors of Mouth 


4 


5 

3 
2 

4 

2 


9 

3 
3 

4 

2 


1 

3 

1 




1 

1 

2 
6 

1 


2 




11 


40. Of Stomach and Liver 


4!' 7 


41. Of Peritoneum, Intest., Rectum 
42» Female Genital Organs.. 


1 


3| 6 
6 1 10 


43. Cancer and other Maiigant Tu- 
mors of Breast 




! 
1 


8 


44. Of Skin 






45. Of other Organs Unspecified 

46. Other Tumors except Female 
Genital Oragns 


2 


3 
1 


5 

1 
1 


2 


2 


4 

1 
1 


9 
1 


47. Acute Articular Rheumatism 

48. Chronic Rheumatism and Gout.. 

49. Scurvy 


1 


2 


2 


4! 

1 

1 


5 


50. Diabetes and Mellitus 


2 


1 


3 




2 


2 

"""I 

1 


5 


51. Exophalmic Goitre 

52. Addisons Disease 

53. Lenkemia 




54. Anaemia Chlorosis 

55. Other General Diseases 

56. Alcoholism, Acute and Chronic. 

57. Lead Poisoninp* 








1 


i 


1 

11 

1 

1 


i 


58. Other Chronic Poisonings of Oc- 
pations 










1 
I 




59. Other Chronic Poisonings 


1 


I 4 


1 5 


j 2| 41 6 


11 


60. Encephalitis 


ll' 2\ 31 

1 
1 11 2 

1 

I 

51 51 

19! 17 36 

I 

11 11 

SI 3 61 

I ' ' 


11 

1 

31 5 
461 45 

1 
1 1 

1 

1 


HI 4 


61. (Bis) Epidemic Cerebro Spinal 
Meningitis 


HI 3 


62. Prog. Locomator Ataxia 

63. Other Diseases of the Spinal 
Cord 


11 

'1 
811 13 


64. Congestion and Hemorrhage 
Spinal Meningitis 


9111 127 
l| 


65 Brain, Softening of 


111 2 


66. Paralysis, Cause Unspecified 

67. Paralvsis General 


11 6 

11... 


Carried Forward 







1 

1 







! 

I 
1 






72 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

After The Bertiu<on Classsification of Causes of Deaths, First 

International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1900. 

Deaths for the Year 1923. 



GENERAL DISEASES— Continued, ! IS 















(U 






to 


rt 

S 

y 
U^ 






T? 


-d 






(U 


(U 












03 


o 


o 


rt 










O 


o 


o 


O 


H 


O 


O 


H 



Brought Forward. 



68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
78. 
74. 
75. 
76. 



Other Fornis of Insanity.... 

Epilepsy 

Convulsions, no Puerperal 

Convulsions of Infants 

Tetanus 

Cholera 

Other Nervous Diseases... 

Diseases of the Eyes , 

Diseases of the Ears 



Diseases of the Circulatory System 



77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 

82. 
83. 

84. 

85. 
86. 



Pericarditis 

Endocarditis, Acute 

Organic Heart Disease, Valvular 

Angina Pectoris 

Diseases of the Arteries, Arthe- 

roma, Aneurism, Etc 

Embolism and Thrombosis 

Diseases of Veins, Vareis, Hem- 
orrhoids, Phlebitis, Etc 

Diseases of Lymphatics, Lym- 

phantitis. Etc 

Hemorrhage 

Other Diseases of Circulatory 
System 



Diseases of Respiratory System 



87. Diseases of Nasal Fossal. 

88. Diseases of the Larynx... 

89. Diseases of Thyroid Body. 

90. Bronchitis, Acute 

91. Bronchitis, Chronic 

92. Pneumonia, Broncho 

93. Pneumonia, Lobar 



Carried Forward 



1 1 

I 21 2 



1 

21 2 

-I 



4 

13 

1 

15 



22 



1 1 

li 1 



11 1| 2|i 

2| 7! 9|| 

231 251 48li 

21 11 31 



13 



1 

I 

561 



30 



11 



I 



21 211 



371 671 

! I I 



123 



61 81 1411 



111 221 
10 221 



1! 

161 25 
241 20 



II! 

411 
44; 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 



73 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

AfTiSR The BERTII.I.ON C1.ASSSIFICAT10N OF Causes op Deaths, First 
International Decenniai, Revision, Paris, 1900. 

Deaths eor the Year 1923. 



GENERAL DISEASES— Continued. 



V) 




<u 








rt 




6 




4; 




u. 




<u 


en 








rt 


i~j 


1 


^ 



Brought Forward. 



94. 
95. 

96. 
97. 
98. 



Pleurisy 

Congestion of Lungs, Pulmonary 

Apoplexy 

Gangrene of Lung 

Asthma 

Pulmonary Em.physema 

Other Diseases of the Respira- 
tory System, Phthisis excepted.. 
Diseases of the Digestive System 
Diseases of Mouth and Adnexa.. 

Diseases of Pharynx 

Diseases of Oesophagus 

Ulcer of Stomach 

Other Diseases of Stomach, Can- 
cer excepted 

Diarrhoea and Enteritis, under 

2 years 

Diarrhoea and Enteritis over 

2 years 

Intestinal Parasites 

Hernia and Intestinal Obstruc- 
tions 

Other Diseases of Intestines 

Acute Yellov^ Atrophy of Liver. 

Hydatid Tumor of Liver 

Liver Cirrhosis 

Biliary Calculi 

Other Diseases of Liver 

Diseases of Spleen 

Simple Peritonitis ...- 



Carried Forward 



Gl 



611 12 
"3 



II 1 



II 3 



161 28 



311 



8| 



II I 1 



J I I 



21 31 5 
-I 



7! 3| 10 



1 

5 

2 
34 



14| 2311 23 

61 14|! 17 

2| 611 10 

6| 911 15 



I 11 



74 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviczn 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

Aftkr The Berttu.on Classsification of Causes of Deaths, Firsi 

International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1900. 

Deaths for the Year 1923. 



GENERAL DISEASES— Continued. 



Brought Forward 

Diseases of Genito Urinary Organ 

119. Nephritis, Acute 

120. Brights Diseases, Chronic 

121. Other Diseases of Kidney and 
Adnexa 

122. Urinary Calculus 

123. Diseases of Bladder 

124. Diseases of Uretha, Urinary 
Abscess, Etc 

125. Enlarged of Prostrate 

\2Q. Non- Venereal Diseases of Male 

Genital Organs 

127. Metritis 

128. Uterine Hemorrhage, not Puer- 
peral 

129. Uterine Tumor, not Puerperal 

130. Other Diseases of Uterus 

131. Ovarian Cyst, and Others 

132. Other Disases of Female Geni- 
tal Organs 

133. Diseases of Breast not Puer- 
peral, not Cancerous 



Puerperal Diseases 



134. 
135. 



Accidents of Pregnancy 

Puerperal Hemorrhage 

136. Other Diseases of Labor 

137. Puerperal Septicaemia 

138. Puerperal Albumuria and Con- 
vulsions 

139. Puerperal Phlegmasia, Alba Do- 
lerus 

140. Other Puerperal Accidents Sud 
den Death 



31 5 
211 37 

2| 3 



28! 
69! 



21 

-! 

I 1! 



■I I- 



21 1 2!| 21 1 2! 

I !l I I I 



! I 
-I I- 



-I I- 



31 81 

-! 11- 

I H 
J II. 



I I !! I I II 

I ! II 1 ( n 

.1 II 111 II 21 311 



.1 1- 



I I 
-I I. 



I I 
-I I. 



Carried Forward 



.1 2! 211 ! 5| 511 

I I 11 I I II 

-I I II I I !|. 



33 
106 



.1 II HI 1 21 211 3 

.1 1 It 1 21 2!I 2 

I I II I I II 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



75 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

AmsR The Bertii.i.on Classsification of Causes of Deaths, First 

International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1900. 

Deaths for the Year 1923. 



GENERAL DISEASES— Continued. 



Brought Forward. 



141. Puerperal Diseases of Breast.. 

142. Gangrene 

143. Furuncle (Carbuncle) 

144. Phlegmon^ Acute Abscess , 

145. Other Diseases of Skin and Ad- 
nex 



Diseases of the Locomotor System 

146. Diseases of Bones, Non-Tuber- 
cular 

147. Anthritis and Other Diseases of 
Joints, T. B. excepted 

148. Amputation 

149. Other Diseases of Organs of 
Locomotion 



Malformations 



150. 



Congenital Malformations, Still- 
Births excepted 

151. Congenital Debilitym Icterus 
Selerma 

152. Other Diseases Peculiar to Early 
Infancy 1 

153. Neglect 

154. Senile Debility 

173. Inanition (Starvation) 

175. Other Acute Poisonings 

177. Dropsy 

179. Causes not Specified or 111 De- 
fined 

Totals 



-I 1| 1 



J J. 



I I 1 

11, 



34 



21 2 

1711 



-I 4 



2 
18 



211 8 

5411 56 

I 1 

1 2 



411 12 



76 



Mayor Grace's Animal R 



CVICW 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

Accidents and Premature Births, Etc., Within the City Limits, 

WITH Ages, and in the Hospital, B>c., eor the Year 1923 



Causes 





en 




ift 


(U 






1^ 






! 'c3 








i 




1 'd 


-o 






C| 


<u 


C/5 

73 




o 


'c3 




(-; 


^ 












^ 


i? 


o 


io 


o 


e^ 





r-i 'd 



o 



Suicide 

Homicide 

Accidents 

Drowned 

Burned 

Hanged 

Want of Vitality. 
Premature Birth . 

Undeveloped 

Still Born 

Totals 



1| 14| 

I 21 

141 26! 



14| 2| 1611 20 

141 61 20il 38 

11 1 111 1 

I ! II 



lOj. 6! 1611 16 

121 181 30il 44 

61 61 1211 14 

89| 95!184|I 210 



243|211|4541147615131989|!1443 



COMPARATIVE MORTALITY. 




20.02 

17.70 

19.00 

20.08 

19.10 

28.30 

23.06 

23.10 

26.90 

25. 

24.30 

27.91 

27.32 

26.70 

23.50 

24.50 

24.42 

27.41 

26.60 

27.51 

26.16 

20.83 

29.09 

^ ^32.71 

♦Populaton U. S. Census July 1, 1923.' 
Still Births only excluded. 

The reapon for the increased mortality for Charleston, is due to the fact, that 
we have included in our death rate, deaths from all causes, with the exclusion of 
still Births. This is done for 1923 in order ro accord v.'ith the standard of all 
other cities. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 
Number oi^ Deaths, With Ages for the Year 1923. 



77 



Ages. 


62 
24 

3 
12 
20 
26 
48 
70 
83 
69 
36 

1 


1 

'o 

.^_ 

191 

82 

14 

50 

141 

135 

155 

115 

62 

28 

11 

1 


1 


Under 1 Year. 


253 


From 1 to 5 Years 

From 5 to 10 Years 


106 
17 


From 10 to 20 Years 


62 


From 20 to 30 Years 


161 


From 30 to 40 Years 


161 


From 40 to 50 Years 


203 


From 50 to 60 Years 


185 


From 60 to 70 Years 


145 


From 70 to 80 Years 


97 


From 80 to 90 Years 


47 


From 90 to 100 Years . . . . . 


2 


Over 100 Years 




Unknown 




4 


4 








Totals- 


454 


989 


1443 






Deaths in Hospitals, Etc. 
Thompson Memorial 


13 

4 

1 

12 

23 




13 


St. Margarets Home 


4 


^nston Home 


1 


Riverside Infirmary . 


12 


Baker Sanitarium 


23 


Seamans Home 




Orphan House 








Ropier Hospital 


84 


260 


344 


County Jail 




Jenkins Orphanage 








Colored Hospital 




2 

7 


2 


Old Folks Home 




7 


Franke Home 


2 


2 


Porter Military Academv 




St. Philips Church Home 








St. Francis Infirmary 


15 




15 


Ashley River Asylum 




Mercy Maternity Hospital 


10 




10 










Totals 


164 


269 


433 







78 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



MORTUARY STATISTICS. 
Number of Death With Place of Nativity for the Yeai 1923 
AND Burials Within the City Limits 



Nativity. 




o 

3 


3 
o 


City of Charleston 


102 
245 
6 
16 
2 
1 
5 
1 
9 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


203 

734 

8 

10 

1 

4 

1 
1 

2 

1 

i 

........ 

"23 


305 


South Carolina 


979 


North Carolina 


14 


Georgia 


26 


Alabama 


2 


Virginia 


2 


New^ York 


9 


Florida 


2 


Pennsylvania 


10 


Mississippi 


1 


Missouri 


1 


Massachusetts 


2 


Maryland 


1 


New Jersey 


1 


Kentucky 


2 


Tennessee 




1 


D. C 


1 


1 


Haiti 


1 


Scotland 


1 

19 

2 

3 

11 
6 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
8 


1 


Germany 


19 


Austria 


2 


Italy 


3 


Ireland 


11 


Russia 


6 


Greece 


1 


Sweeden 


1 


Roumania 


1 


England 


3 


Canada 


1 


Syria 


1 


Poland 


1 


Denmark 


1 


Unknown 


31 






Totals 


454 


989 


1443 







Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 



79 



BURIAI.S Within the City Liuits 



Burials. 



St. Peters Church Yard 

St. Johns Chapel Church Yard 

St. Johns Lutheran Church Yard... 

St. Michaels Church Yard 

St. Philips Church Yard 

First Presbyterian Church Yard 

Sjecond Presbyterian Church Yard. 

First Baptist Church Yard 

Unitarian Church Yard 

Bethel Church Yard 

Circular Church Yard 

Trinity Church Yard 

The Cathedral Church Yard 

St. Mary's Church Yard 

Seaman's Ground 

Century Fellowship Church Yard- 
Colored Catholic Church Yard 

Calvary Episcopal Church Yard 

Ephrat Church Yard 

St. Paul's Church Yard 

Public (Potters Field) 



Totals 22 260 282 



257 



263 



MARRIAGES: 

White 117 

Colored 106 

Total 223 

BIRTHS: 

White, Males 447 

White, Females - 411 

Total 858 

Colored, Males 538 

Colored, Females - 537 

Total 1,075 



Grand Total 1,933 

TWINS: 

White ~. 9 

Colored 19 

Total 28 

TRIPLETS: 

White 

Colored 1 

Total 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

LESTER SCHWARTZBERG, 

Chief Clerk, 
J. MERCIER GREEN, M. D., H. 0. 



80 , Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

WEATHER CONDITIONS IN CHARLESTON 
DURING THE YEAR 1923. 

The year of 1923 was rather equable in Charleston, 
there being no extremes of temperature at any season. 
The winter and the early spring were mild, the late spring 
and summer moderate and the fall fairly cool. The mean 
temperature for the year was about normal. Rainfall was 
deficient. 

Summary by Months 

January opened mild, with day temperatures betweens 60 
and 70 degrees, continuing, with only a few breaks, above 
normal all the month. Rains were mostly light and at 
long intervals apart. The weather was mostly fair and 
sunshine was above normal, averaging 74% of the possible 
amount. 

February was warm at the beginning and the end of the 
month, but below normal most of the time between the 
5th, and the 25th, with freezing temperature on 5 days. 
Rainfall was very light and sunshine was above normal. 

March was warmer than usual most of the time, with 
day temperatures often between 70 and 80 degrees and 
night temperatures generally above 50. Rains were fairly 
frequent but light. The weather was mostly pleasant with 
abundant sunshine. 

April was normal, as far as temperatures were concerned, 
and much below normal in rainfall. There were 3 thunder- 
storms but no gales. 

May was very equable, with no extremes of temperature, 
and averaged 2.1 degrees below normal. Raninfall was 
nearly double to normal amount and there were 14 rainy 
days. Cloudy weather predominated and sunshine was 
deficient. n 

June was normal, with maximum temperatures above 90 
degrees occasionally and the usual number of fair and 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 81 

cloudy days. Winds were light and thunderstorms infre- 
quent. 

July was moderate with maximum temperatures seldom 
above 90 degrees. Thunderstorms were very numerous, 
occuring on 18 days, but winds were mostly light. Cloudy 
weather predominated and sunshine was below normal. 

August was rather hot frequent thundershowers afforded 
considerable relief. Precipitation was excessive on several 
occasions and the monthly total was nearly double the nor- 
mal for August, Winds were light and the humidity 
slightly above normal. 

September was moderate, as far as temperatures were 
concerned, there being only 3 days with maximum tem- 
perature of 90 degrees or over. Rains were frequent but 
totaled less than half the normal amount. 

October was fairly cool with temperatures blow normal 
much of the time. Rains were light and at infrequent inter- 
vals. Cloudy weather predominated and sunshine was below 
normal. 

November averaged 3.1 degrees below normal and was 
also deficient in rainfall with a drought from the 6th to 
the 23rd. There were frosts on sevral days, with killing 
frost on the 10th. 

December was moderate with temperatures above normal 
most of the time. Rainfall was slightly above normal and 
well distributed throughout the month. Winds were light, 
the weather mostly cloudy and sunshine deficient. 

J. E. LOCKWOOD 

Meteorologist. 



82 Mayor Grace's Annual Rndcw 

REPORT WATER DEPARTMENT 
COMMISSIONERS: 



J. ROSS PIANAHAN, Chairman 
LELAND MOORE Hon. JNO. P. GRACE, 

JULIUS H. JAHNZ Mayor. 

A. J. W. GORSE 

OFFICERS : 

J. E. GIBSON, Manager and Engineer. 

F. B. McDowell, jr., Asst. to Mgr. and Engineer. 

E. EARL EVANS, Treasurer and Assistant Secretary. 

CLIFFORD THOMPSON, Clerk of Council, Secretary. 

O. H. BISSELL, Contract and New Business Clerk. 

C. BENNETT, Supt. Mains and Distribution. 

E. G. SNELSON, Cashier. 

GEORGE H. MOFFETT, Attorney. 

PARKER LABORATORIES, 

Bacteriologists and Chemists. 
T. E. FUSSELL, Engineer in Charge Pumping Station. 



March 12th, 1924. 
7^0 the Mayor and Aldermen, 

of City Council of Charleston, 

City. 

Gentlemen: 

I herewith hand you report of Commissioners of Pub- 
lic Works for the year ending December 31st, 1923. The 
report of Mr. J. E. Gibson, Manager and Engineer, is full 
and complete, covering in detail the work of the Commis- 
sion for the past year, and is attached as a part of this re- 
port. 

The report of Mr. E. Earl Evans, Treasurer, shows the 
financial condition of the Commission, and. is also attached 
as a part of this report. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 83 

The books of the Commission have been audited by Mr. 
C. L. Vann, Pubhc Certified Accountant, and his audit is 
attached as a part of this report. 

I beg to commend the work of the Officers and Em- 
ployees of the Commission, who have been very efficient 
and loyal. 

Commissioner Julius H. Jahnz's time having expired, 
he was re-elected December, 1923, for another term expir- 
ing in 1929. 

Due to the resignation of our Chairman, Mr. J. Ross 
Hanahan, made necessary by his election as Alderman from 
Ward No. 1, Mr. M. B. Barkley was appointed to fill out 
his unexpired term. The Commission was reorganized by 
the election of the following Officers : 

Leland Moore, Chairman; Julius H. Jahnz, Vice-Chair- 
man ; J. E. Gibson, Manager and Engineer ; E. Earl Evans, 
Treasurer. 

During the year the Commission has carried out its policy 
of adding to, and improving the system in every way, the 
details of which will be found in the report of the Man- 
ager and Engineer. 

Respectfully, 

COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WORKS, 

LELAND MOORE, 

Chairman. 



Charleston, S. C, January 25, 1924 

Mr. Leland Moore, Chairman, 

Commissioners of Public Works, 
Charleston, S. C. 

Dear Sir : — 

I herewith submit mv annual report of the operations 
of the Department for the year 1923. 



84 Mayor Grace's Amiital Review 

LABOR CONDITIONS 

The continued depression of business in the southeast 
and the exceptional demand for common labor in the north- 
ern, central and eastern sections of the country resulted in 
a wide spread migration of labor from this section. Gen- 
erally it is only the better or more intelligent labor that 
has the courage and ability to move to a new community 
and **make good". This movement of labor not only de- 
pleted the supply, but caused a raise in the scale of wages 
in this vicinity, and we were no exception to the rule. 

We were paying our employees above the prevailing local 
scale of wages and all were satisfied; nevertheless, the al- 
luring letters and statements of friends that had gone North 
stampeded some of our oldest negro employees with the re- 
sult that for a few weeks, early in the summer, we were 
hard pressed to keep sufficient men to adequately run the 
plant and maintain the pumping station grounds. 

Wages were raised in some cases, especially the semi- 
skilled men, but otherwise we have only met the local 
scale, feeling that it was unwise and useless to try to keep 
men that had been attacked with the North's ''high-wage 
fever" by raising wages, realizing that nothing would 
ultimately satisfy them but to try their hand in those labor 
markets. 

We were able, due to the greater efficiency of the plant 
and labor employed, and our policy of only meeting the 
local scale of wages, to maintain the total increased outlay 
for labor for operating the plant to less than $400.00 for 
the year as compared with 1922. 

INCOME AND DISBURSEMENTS 

The report of the Treasurer, submitted herewith, shows 
a continued healthly financial condition of your plant. The 
gross annual income, $431,021.95, was $2,908.41 greater 
than for the year 1922 and exceeded our previous banner 
year of 1920 by $2,102.81. This excellent showing was 
made possible only by constant effort, and the maintenance 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 85 

of the distribution system, meters, etc., in a high state of 
of efficiency that a maximum of the water pumped was ac- 
counted for with a commensurate return. 

Continued progress was made in effecting economies in 
the mechanical plant at Ilanahan. The installation of the 
new high service pumping engine in 1922 permitted the 
overhauling of the steam ends of the two Snow Engines 
installed in 1903 when the plant was built. These engines 
had had only minor repairs made to the steam ends from 
time to time, the major repairs being confined entirely 
to the water ends. 

They have done excellent service, but were in need of 
general overhauling. The high pressure cylinders and all 
valve chambers were rebored and fitted with new pistons, 
piston rings and valves. The low pressure cylinders were 
not rebored, but were fitted with new pistons, bull and 
steam rings. All the valve gears, dash pots and link motion 
rods and pins were trued up and bushed. New piston rods 
with metallic packing were furnished, and when the repairs 
were completed the engines ran as smoothly as if new. 

The total cost of these repairs alone amounted to over 
$7000.00, and this was charged out as operating expenses 
during the year although representing an accumulated de- 
ferred maintenance for substantially twenty years. 

Disbursements for labor and material for operation of 
the Hanaham Plant was $5,054.86 less than 1922. This 
saving was due partly to lower fuel cost and an increase 
in the overall mechanical efficiency of the plant, but mainl)^ 
to a reduction in the amount of water pumped. 

The disbursements for operation and maintenance of 
the distribution system was $2,933.56 greater than 1922. 
Of this increase $2,725.80 was due to repairs of service 
pipes and is explained by our continued policy of renewing 
all old iron service pipes in the streets and under sidewalks 
to property line, with ''AA" lead pipe. In addition to 
these expenses we spent $14,113.14 on the inspection, repair 
and renewal (where required) of all mains, valves and 



86 Mayor Grace's Anmml Review 

service pipes in advance of new paving. This expense is 
an increase of $3,840.31 over that of 1922. 

The operating cost for maintenance at the Hanahan 
Plant increased $10,391.10 over 1922 and is made up of 
repairs to the Snow Engines heretofore mentioned. 

We spent $2,481.29 on repairs, painting and otherewise 
maintaining the property and huildings leased to our em- 
ployees for residences. This item, while large, represents 
a deferred maintenance of from six to eight years. 

Fixed charges increased $6,754.62 due to increased in- 
terest charges on surplus invested in plant. This increase 
is returned as an earning in the income account under the 
heading of Interest on Surphis Invested in Plant. 

The net income or surplus, after paying all regular oper- 
ating and extraordinary expenses, repairs, maintenance, de- 
preciation, sinking fund and interest on bonds and govern- 
ment loan, but exclusive of street, city, county and fed- 
eral taxes (Municipally owned water plants are exempt 
from all taxes) was $121,484.73. 

This surplus is being turned back into the plant in the 
form of extensions and improvements as is more fully 
shown in the Treasurer's report imder Schedule **H". The 
total surplus earned during the six years and three months 
of Commission operation of the water plant is $768,584.57. 
Had we not been able to earn this surplus it would have 
meant that a bond issue would have been required to make 
these necessary improvements and extensions whereas we 
tiow have these made and paid for, and no one has paid in 
excess of his or her needs or demands and everyone has 
paid without regard as to whether he is a permanent or 
transient resident of the city. 

WATER SUPPLY AND RAINFALL 

The monthly and annual rainfall at Hanahan for the past 
twenty years is given in Table 2. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



87 



TABLE NO. 2. 

RAINFALL GOOSE CREEK PUMPING STATION, WATER DEPARTMENT, 

HANAHAN, S. C. TWENTY YEAR RECORD 



Year 





i 


o 


a 


>> 


(1) 

3 




I 


1 


u 

1 

O 




i 



1904 

1905 

1906-._.,_. 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 -_.... 

1923 - 



3.94 

I 1-011 

1 4.38| 

I 1.14 

2.63 

0.60 

2.51 

1.33 

5.121 

3.99 

2.20 

10.77 

1.54 

2. 

1.52 

I 2.26| 

1.081 

2.751 

I 3.381 

I 1-911 



I 
3.571 
3.391 
2.921 
1.90 
5.63 
3.07 
4.17 
1.50 
6.56 
5.55 
9.00 
3.63 
1.87 
2.19 
1.02 
6.66| 
3.771 
2.19| 
4.91 
1.19 



1.90 


1.23| 


5.63 


3.84 


3.07 


6.40 


4.17 


1.43 


1.50 


4.38 


6.56 


4.39 


5.55 


5.72 


9.00 


4.32 


3.63 


2.78 


1.87 


2.50 


2.19 


4.19 


1.02 


1.33 



I 

1.54 
3.03] 

3.38| 
1.23| 
3.84 
6.40 
1.43 
1.38 
4.39 
5.72 
1.32 
2.78 
2.50 
4.19 
1.33 
3.991 
5.291 
3.64J 
4.591 
6.38 



0.17 


4.42 


2.65 


6. 


3.22 5.91 


2.03 


5. 


1.14 2.23 


8.11 


9. 


4.76 1.68 


3.48] 5. 


5.15 


5.78 


4.071 4. 


4.64 


3.01 


3.81 8. 


1.92 


1.83 


6.75 7. 


2.15 


0.23 


3.16| 8. 


6.03 


5.64 


6.421 8. 


3.41 


0.46 


8.42 


9. 


3.271 0.54 


5.57 


5.< 


5.72111.81 


8.18 


9. 


2.22 1.26 


8.62 


28.^ 


1.90 4.54 


3.77 


15. 


4.55 3.16 


2.29 


8. 


0.72 4.07 


7.08 13. 


6.35 1.66 


2.06 9. 


2.62 8.45 


2.49 15. 


2.87 6.08 


6.87 10. 


1.36 


7.82 


3.07 


6. 



10.871 
3.03 
5.57 

11.87 

6.90| 

8.93 

15.89 

9.86 

3.54 

6.82 

12.21 

9.94 

5.39 

7.48 

5.56 

,61| 5.791 

20111.941 

02| 9.96| 

79| 7.52 

911 9.211 



I I 



2.92| 
2.50 
6.89 
1.30 

1.83 
2.80 
8.34 
2.27 
1.43 
10.25 
5.56 
7.35 
3.35 
0.12 
1.61 
7.9| 0.08 
481 0.12 
69| 1.32 
.10| 6.051 
.25| 2.20] 



2.04 

1.27 

0.52 

1.36 

2.31 

0.91 

3.04 

2.60 

1.55 

1.65 

1.80 

2.581 

1.11 

0.11 

3.16 

0.11 

3.36 

1.89 

0.24| 

3.39| 



I, I 



1.58141.76 
4.65136.87 
2.69 50.66 
6.51148.25 
1.36|45.17 



3.15 
1.29 
4.02 
4.24 
4.15 



50.74 
58.72 
46.31 

68.71 
63.84 
4.45|59.29 
6.58183.67 
2.33|60.21 
1.26|51.25 
4.64|41.32 
0.47|47.64 
3.86|55.17 
0.96|56.98 
8.23|r,5.63 
5.04151.73 



Normal .___-. I 2.85 1 3.731 3.721 3.2l| 4.031 4.94| 



i. I, 



8.41| 4.871 3-41| 1-75| 3.57|54.25 



The elevation and storage data for the Goose Creek Im- 
pounding Reservoir for the past seven years is given in 
Table No. 4. 

It will be seen b}^ reference to the table that the maximum 
darft on the reservoir occurred in November and amounted 
to seven inches, a depletion of 381,600.000 gallons, equival- 
en to 13.7% of the total storage available. 

TABLE NO. 4. 

STORAGE DATA GOOSE CREEK IMPOUNDING RESERVOIR, 1917 to 1923 

INCLUSIVE. DRAINAGE AREA 42.5 SQUARE MILES. STORAGE 

CAPACITY 2,781,660,000 GALLONS. FLOW LINE 

ELEVATION 10.5 FEET. 



Date 



Jan. 1st 

Feb. 1st 

Mch. 1st 

Apr. 1st 

May 1st 

June 1st 

July 1st 

Aug. 1st 

Sept. 1st 

Oct. 1st 

Nov. 1st. 

*Nov. 24th 

Dec. 1st 

Jan. 1st 



Elevation Water Surface 



1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


! 

5.901 8.23 


8.00 


8.23 


10.74 


8.87 


10.7P 


6.39 


7.82 


9.28 


7.78 


10.71 


8.93 


10.62 


7.01 


7.49 


10.80 


7.88 


10.56 


10.74 


10.50 


7.79 


6.82 


10.31 


9.88 


10.67 


10.58 


10.87 


8.79 


6.62 


9.76 


10.77 


10.22 


10.25 


10.40 


8.29 


6.15 


10.56 


10.14 


10.51 


10.80 


10.80 


7.56 


4.73 


10.65 


9.50 


10.13 


10.61 


10.36 


10.18 


4.04 


10.69 9.80 


10.75 


10.98 


10.68 


9.82 


3.83110.50 


10.51 


10.50 


10.54 


10.92 


9.79 


5.08|10.08 


10.74 


10.13 


10.18 


10.51 


9.20 


3.811 9.42 


10.08 


9.55 


10.43 


10.24 


8.76i*1.08| 8.87 


9.97 


9.37 


10.02 


9.92 


8.69 


1.85 


8.75 


10.03 


9.29 


9.96 


10.21 



8.231 8.00| 8.23tl0.74l 8.87|10.79ll0.60 



Amount of Storage 

Million Gallons. 
Above Elevation 0.0 



191' 



1918(1919 19201 19211 1922] 192S 



325 

505 

800 

1,160 

1,710 
1,420 
1,0451 
2,5801 
'2.3401 
2,3201 
1,950| 
1,6901 
1,640| 



1,40511, 
1,190 2, 
1,03013, 

710|2, 
6I0I2, 
410|2, 
147|1, 
120|2, 
118|2, 
170|2, 
115|2, 
*35|1, 
5511, 



1.405ll,290|l 



290 

000 

000 

660 

300 

820 

890 

920|2, 

78012, 

500i2, 

09012, 

760|2, 

690|2, 

380|2, 



1 
38012, 
160|2, 
220|2. 
380 1 2, 
97012, 
540(2, 
140(2, 
320(2, 
780(2, 
940(2, 
500(2, 
430(2, 
480(2, 
940 1, 



940(1 

93811 

830(2 

920(2 

60012 

78512 

540(2, 

960 

7 S3 

540 

170 

016(2, 

010(2 

750(2 



,750(2,980 
,780(2,862 
,94012,780 
,840(3,040 
620 2,720 
990 2,990 
860 2,690 
2,710 
3,080 
2,783 



2,730 2,620 



2,400 
2.600 
2.855 



♦Minimum stage. Elevation Center of 30 in. Intake 0.0. 



88 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 



PUMPING STATION RECORDS OF WATER 
PUMPED AND FILTERED. 

Table No. 5 gives the daily and monthly records of water 
pumped from Goose Creek, filtered and pumped to the city. 

It will be seen that there was an average daily pumpagf 
of 5,600,000 gallons of water pumped from the impounding 
reservoir to the sedimentation basin and of this amount 
there was delivered to the distribution system 5,430.000 
gallons daily. The difference, 170,000 gallons per day or 
3.07%, represents water used for washing filters dissolving 
chemicals, making steam, cleaning reservoirs, sedimen- 
tation basins, clear water basin and other incidental uses 
around the plant. 

Comparing this record with that of 1922, it will be not- 
ed that there was a reduction of 730,000 gallons per day 
pumped from the creek to the sendimentation basins and a 
reduction of 700,000 gallons per day pumped to the city. 

There was an increase of two hundred and two active 
consumers during the year as compared with one hundred 
and sixty for the year of 1922. 

TABLE No. 5. 

TOTAL MONTHLY AND AVERAGE DAILY PUMPAGE OF WATER FROM 

GOOSE CREEK STORAGE RESERVOIR, 1923, 

MILLION GALLONS. 



Month 


1 1 Pumped to | Per Ct. of Water 
Sedimentation | Water Filtered | City after | Pumped from Creek 
1 1 Filtration | Pumped to City 




Monthly 


Daily 


Monthly 


Daily 


Monthly 


Daily 


Per Cent. 


Jan. 

Feb. 

Mch. 

Apr. 

May ....-.._ 
June _.... 
July ._- 

Aug 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. ...... 

Dec. 


176.68 
156.03 
174.70 
170.68 
180.98 
181.91 
171.87 
169.79 
166.26 
168.82 
163.36 
162.22 


5.70 
5.58 
5.64 
5.69 
5.84 
6.08 
5.54 
5.48 
5.54 
5.44 
5.34 
5.23 


176.63 
155.90 
175.02 
170.93 
180.68 
174.62 
171.57 
169.69 
165.70 
168.97 
163.31 
162.02 


5.70 
5.57 
5.65 
5.69 
5.83 
5.82 
5.53 
5.47 
5.52 
5.45 
5.44 
5.22 


173.30 
152.90 
171.15 
166.33 
176.29 
169.42 
166.72 
164.80 
160.90 
164.14 
158.77 
157.77 


5.59 
5.46 
5.52 
5.54 
5.69 
5.65 
5.38 
5.32 
5.36 
5.30 
5.29 
5.09 


98.1 

97.9 

98.0 

97.4 

97.4 

93.1* 

97.1 

97.1 

96.7 

97.3 

97.2 

97.3 


Totals 

and 

Averages 


2042.30 


5.60 


2035.04 5.57 


1982.49 


5.43 


97.1 



•Washing Sedimentation Basin. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 89 

OPERATION AND DISTRIBUTION DEPARTMENT 

We have a total of 9,219 active consumers out of a 
total of 10,314 on the system. This is an increase of 125 
over that of last year.. 

It will be seen that we have a total of 9,219 active con- 
sumers out of a total of 10,314 on the system. This is an 
increase of 125 over that of last year. 

There are no active fiat rate service and the item of 158 
inactive flat services represents services that are at present 
not being used, but that the Department feels will sooner or 
later be called upon for service at which time they will be 
metered. The abandoned services are those services that 
have been disconnected from the main on account of 
changes in property, or being too small in size are carried 
for purposes of record only. 

EFFICIENCY OF FILTRATION AND PURIFI- 
CATION WORKS 

Bacteriological and chemical examinations of the water 
made dally by the Parker Laboratories show that the qual- 
ity of the water delivered to the citizens has been m.aintain- 
ed at an average high standard. 

The treatment of the water during the year consisted of 
sterilization of the raw water with liquid chlorine and 
coagulation with sulphate of alumina, sedimentation and 
filtration through rapid sand filters and the restoration of 
alkalinity by the use of sodium hydroxide. 

During the algae-growing season copper sulphate Is used 
in the impounding reservoir together with small amounts 
in the outlets from the sedimentation basins with a much 
more restricted amount used in the clear water basin. It 
is found that by an occasional small dosage of copper sul- 



90 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

phatc in the clear water basin the growth of algae in this 
basin can be controlled and rednced to a minimum. 

The use of sodium hydroxide or caustic soda was first 
commenced in the fall of 1922 and was continued through- 
out the year 1923. The advantages obtained in this treat- 
ment are that the water in artificially softened rather than 
hardened as with the lime treatment, and the carbonic acid 
content is more easily controlled. 

We have adopted colorimetric tubes for the determina- 
tion of the hydrogen-ion concentration, and during the year 
we have maintained a hydrogen-ion value of not less than 
7.2 in the filtered w^ater going to the city. 

We find that the caustic soda method of treatment is very 
much simpler, more constant in its action and cleaner than 
the lime method and, while w^e estimated the cost to be con- 
siderably greater than lime, we find that due to the re- 
duction in pumpagc and other economies effected that the 
gross cost has been immateriel, especially so when the 
qi.iality and constancy of the product obtained are consider- 
ed. Further, there is undoubtedly a material saving ef- 
fected in the amount of soap and softening compounds re- 
quired. The manager of one of our laundry companies 
stated to us that he had been enabled, due to the change in 
the treatment of the water, to entirely dispense with all 
softening compounds. 

Tables Nos. 10, 11 and 12 show the results of a typical 
sanitary and mineral analysis and the hypothetical combina- 
tions of the elements in the raw and filtered w^ater for the 
past four years. 

It will be noted from this analysis that the total solids 
have averaged less than one hundred parts per million in 
the filtered w^ater w^ith a hardness of below tw^enty-five parts 
per million. This means that the w^ater is a very soft and 
most excellent w^ater for domestic, manufacturing and steam 
making purposes. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



91 



TABLE No. 10. 

SANITARY ANALYSIS OF RAW AND FILTERED WATER 

PARTS PER MILLION. 



Date 



Item or Element 



Color 

Chlorine 

Alkalinity 

Hardness 

Free Ammonia 

Albuminoid Ammonia 
Nitrogen as Nitrites.. 
Nitrogen as Nitrates- 
Free Carbon Dioxide — 
Total Solids 



Oct. 7, 1920 Dec. 3, 1921 Nov. 17. 1922 Oct. 18. 1923 



Raw I Filtered 



Raw I Filtered 



140.00 

15.00 

14.25 

8.00 

0.05 

1.174 

0.00 

0.00 

5.00 

90.00 



25.00 

16.00 

21.00 

23.00 

0.04 

0.18 

0.00 

0.00 

2.00 

88.00 



Raw| Filtered Raw | Filtered 





30.00 


15.00 


ti 


15.50 


1 


12.50 


0.04 


m 


0.15 


>} 


0.001 


0.000 


fi 


4.00 


<: 


75.00 



115.00 

16.00 

16.00 

13.00 

0.01 

0.30 

0.00 

0.00 

6.00 

96.00 



25.00 

17.00 

22.00 

14.00 

0.01 

0.06 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

77.00 



TABLE No. 11. 

MINERAL ANALYSIS OF RAW AND FILTERED WATER 

PARTS PER MILLION. 



Datt 


Oct 


7, 1920 


Dec. 


3, 1921 


Nov. 17, 1922 


Oct 


. 18, 1923 


Item or Element 


Raw 


Filtered 


Raw 


Filtered 


Raw 


1 Filterec 


Raw 


Filtered 


Sodium 





0.98 


2.36 


3.14 


V 


14.43 


5.97 


10.13 


Potassium 


6 


1.00 
1.00 


0.00 
1.74 


0.00 
1.46 


B 


0.00 
1.53 


0.21 
3.20 


0.96 


Magnesium 


2.77 


Calcium 


4J 


12.50 


5.79 


12.44 


*? 


3.34 


4.79 


5.65 


Iron -_.. _ 


^ 


0.20 


0.57 


0.36 


c 


0.86) 


1.55 


0.80 


Aluminum 




1.94 


2.08 


1.14 




2.34) 


Chlorine 




9.00 


15.00 


16.00 


22 


15.00 


16.00 


17.00 


Sulphate Radical 


>f 


19.85 


4.08 


17.34 


1 


3.40 


2.02 


15.06 


Insoluble Matter _ 


c 


4.00 


5.30 


2.90 


4.00 


4.55 


4.35 


Loss on Ignition 


< 


20.00 


35.75 


31.15 


< 


14.10 


31.90 


22.90 



TABLE No. 12. 

HYPOTHETICAL COMBINATION OF ELEMENTS RAW AND FILTERED 

WATER PARTS PER MILLION. 



Date 


Oct. 


7, 1920 


Dec. 


3, 1921 


Nov 


17, 1922 


Oct. 18, 1923. 


Element 


Raw 


Filtered 


Raw 


Filtered 


Raw [Filtered 


Raw 1 


Filtered 


Loss on Ignition 




20.00 


35.75 


31.15 




14.10 


31.90 


22.90 


Insoluble Matter 




4.00 


5.30 


2.90 




4.00 


4.55 


4.35 


Iron & Aluminum Oxides 


■tj 


3.95 


2.65 


1.50 


Q> 


3.20 


1.55 


0.80 


Sodium Chloride 


s 


2.49 


5.99 


7.74 


^ 


24.75 


15.16 


25.73 


Potassium Chloride 


1.91 


0.00 


0.00 


B 


0.00 


0.40 


1.83 


Magnesium Chloride 


t 


3.91 


6.80 


5.71 


+^ 


0.00 


8.87 


0.71 


Calcium Chloride 


c 


5.76 


9.91 


12.62 


c 


0.00 







Sodium Sulphate 


m 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




5.03 






Calcium Sulphate 




28.19 


7.42 


24.52 




0.00 


1.55 


7.42 


Calcium Carbonate 


CvJ 


5.18 


1.08 


1.70 


8.35 


11.98 


8.73 


Sodium Carbonate 


< 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


9.32 






Magnesium Carbonate -= 
Magnesium Sulphate — 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


< 


5.29 





















2.52 


12.79 



EXTENSIONS OF MAINS IN DISTRIBUTION 
SYSTEM. 

On account of the continued high prices of cast iron 
pipe, we made no extensions in the distribution system 
except under an absolute necessity or in advance of new 



92 Mayor Grace's Aiumal Review 

paving rather than tear up this new paving later when the 
extension was actually required. 

There was a net addition of one and eight-tenths miles 
of mains added to the system during the year, making a 
total of 103.7 miles of distribution and supply mains. 
There was added 62 valves and 20 liydrants making a total 
of 1093 valves and 678 hydrants on the system. 

Of the total number of 678 hydrants so classed nine are 
paid for by private interests as a protection to their pro- 
perty. All hydrants were inspected, repaired, painted and 
numbered. Color adopted was an orange yellow with black 
near pavement line to take the splash from rain water. 
This color has proved very distinctive both by sun and 
artifical light. 

A survey of all valves was made to determine if they 
were in working order and if open. 

FIRE PROTECTION FOR SUBURBAN 
COMMUNITIES 

There has been a number of sub-developments, namely- 
Chicora Place, Cherokee Place, Windsor Hill and Garden 
Hill, that have grown to such proportions that there should 
be some means whereby these communities could cooperate 
and form fire districts and make contract with the City 
Water Department for fire protection having hydrants 
placed on the lines for community use in fighting fires. 

There has been a number of fires around the Navy Yard 
in which the NavyYard has furnished water and the City- 
fire engines have been called to assist. In each of these cases 
the Navy Yard people have made demands that w^e malce 
them a reduction in the bill, due to the water consumed for 
fighting these fires. We can see no reason why these com- 
munities should depend upon either the generosity of the 
National Government or the City of Charleston for such 
protection. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 93 

The furnishing of water by the Navy Yard for this pur- 
pose is in reality a violation of the spirit and letter of the 
contract between the Navy Department and the Water De- 
partment, although it may be classed as humanitarian. The 
Water Department of Charleston is organized and main- 
tained for the benefit of the citizens of Charleston. The 
residents of the suburban communities are enabled to obtain 
the same advantages as a citizen, so far as water supply 
is concerned, of Charleston, without having to bear any of 
the burden of increased taxation due to the operations of 
the Water Department and, therefore, they are not entitled 
to any additional benefits such as service heretofore render- 
ed by the Navy Department in case of fire. 



WATER FURNISHED MUNICIPALITY UNDER 
THE TERMS OF CONTRACT, NOT TO EXCEED 
THREE HUNDRED THOUSAND GALLONS PER 

DAY. 

Table No. 19 gives the amount and value of the water 
furnished the city for sewer flushing and other municipal 
uses, such as Fire and Police Stations, Orphan Houses, the 
Roper Hospital and City Hall, under the provisions of the 
agreement that the City is to receive 300.000 gallons of 
water per day, equivalent .to 40,000 cubic feet, for muni- 
cipal used as designated. 

This allowance amounts to 14,600,000 cubic feet per 
year and it will be noted from the table that the city has 
exceeded this allowance every year for the past three years, 
and it has only been by the most constant effort on the part 
of the Water Department that this consumption has been 
kept within the present limits. It is generally well recog- 
nized that gifts are little appreciated ; for instance, the old 
adage ''easy come, easy go" and this table fully bears this 
out. 



94 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Note the consumption of water by the Roper Hospital. 
During the year 1923 it has increased ahnost threefold over 
1922 and twofold over 1921. We are not fully acquainted 
with the developments in the hospital, but do not feel that 
the activities during tlie past year has multiplied in any 
such proportion and we are forced to the conclusion that 
the great increase in water consumption at this institution 
represents waste. 

We further feel that in appropriations made such institu- 
tions from the tax fund by City Council, there should be 
included the amount of water furnished in accordance with 
the schedule of rates as adopted by your Commission; or, 
stated differently, if an institution is made an appropria- 
tion then the amount of water used by this institution should 
be charged to them and credited to the account of the ap- 
propriation for the fire hydrants and municipal uses of 
water. 

There is another abuse in connection with the wasting 
of w^ater by the municipality, and that is the indiscriminate 
taking of w^ater by the City Sewer and Street Departments 
and contractors from the fire hydrants of the City. Gen- 
erally speaking, a fire hydrant is a fairly simple piece of 
apparatus, but it is not made or installed for any purpose 
other than the fighting of fires, and the hydrants should not 
be constantly opened and closed for the taking of water 
for construction purposes, street sprinkling, sewer flush- 
ing, etc., and especially by people unacquainted with the 
mechanism and its method of operation. 

The Police Department of the city does not seem to 
realize that this is a part of the property of the city, and 
w^e are yet to have any knowledge where an offender against 
the City Ordinances for the Protection of Fire Hydrants, 
has been apprehended or brought before the Recorder's 
Court. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



95 



TABLE No. 19. 

WATER FURNISHED CITY INSTITUTIONS AND FOR STREET CLEANING 
AND FLUSHING SEWERS. 



INSTITUTION 



City Hospital, Roper __ 

City Sewer Station, Price's Alley 

City Stables, Line Street 

City Supply, 134 Line Street 

City Incinerator, Lee Street 

City Lot, 139 Line Street 

Engine House, 114-116 Meeting St 

City Eng. House, Meeting & Wentworth 

Engine House, 46 John Street 

Engine House, 7 Cannon Street 

Engine House, 12-16 Huger Street 

Wading Pool, Rutledge A. & Fishburne St 

City Hall, Broad and Meeting Streets 

Charleston Home, 63 Columbus Street 

Charlesston Orphan House, St. Philip St.-. 

City Orphan House, Queen Street 

City Public Market 

Police Station, St. Philip Street 

City Park Commissioners, Hampton Park 
City Sewer System, Flush Tank and Street 

Cleaning (Estimated) 

Drinking Fountain, Meeting and Calhoun 

Street (8 Months)^.- .' 



Cubi( 
1921 I 



; Feet 
1922 



|Vai. in Dollars 
19231 I 1923 



1,420,0001 

31,400| 

131,000 

3,650 

7,930 

37,790 

64,386 

51,907 

21,350 

62,190 

19,360 

240 

10,790 

198,780 

545,894 

301,320 

160,302 

193,150 

1,467,744 

12,000,000 



,057,900 
21,500 

150,970 
5,810 
5,200 
69,820 
56,680| 
38,620 
23,910 
26,380 
32.170 



13,670 
219,520 
337,080 
145,430 

58,889 
158.850 
,205,652 

12,000,000 



2.821,490 

10,790 

136,277 

3,740 

33,300 

81,940 

35,000 

51,830 

26,090 

26,090 

33,820 

1,380 

21,450 

197,400 

566,510 

186,550 

46,350 

243,120 

623,880 



3,453.64 

19.96 

234.42 

6.92 

61.60 

145.30 

64.75 

94.11 

48.27 

48.27 

62.57 

2.55 

39.68 

326.10 

846.46 

809.82 

85.00 

394.68 

921.04 



10,000,000 10,450.00 
76,4381 135.94 



TOTAL 16.729,183 16.629.951 15,228,445 $17,761.08 



EVAPORATION FROM THE STORAGE 
RESERVOIR. 

The Water Department has for years maintained evap- 
oration gauges at the Hanahan Pumping Station to deter- 
mine the loss of water from the storage or impounding 
reservoir, by evaporation from the water surface. This 
record now covers a period of nineteen years, and we have 
been asked on several occasions for copies of it. We, 
therefore, feel that as a matter of engineering interest and 
to preserve the record from being lost that it is advisable 
to put it in this report. 

There are two gauges maintained; one known as the 
Water or Reservoir and the other known as the Land Guage. 

The evaporation gauge, located in the storage reservoir, 
consists of a cylinder six inches internal diameter and 
thirty inches long. This cylinder is supported inside of 
a pan approximately twenty-four inches in diameter that 
has its outer rim about two inches above the water surface. 



96 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

The top of the six inch cyHnder in which the evaporation 
is measured is approximately five inches above the water 
surface. The remaining length of this cylinder, or two 
feet, is therefore submerged in the reservoir and the water 
of the reservoir is free to circulate around it without pro- 
tection other than the walls of the vessel itself. The entire 
apparatus is anchored off shore about twenty feet on sup- 
porting frame work, pulleys and counter weights so that 
it rises and falls with the water surface. 

The land gauge is a similar vessel as to size and length, 
without the twenty- four inch supporting pan. It is sup- 
ported in a large cast iron pipe fitting approximately thirty 
inches above the ground. The space between the evaporation 
cylinder and the fitting is filled with soil to within two 
inches of the top of the cylinedr. There is then placed 
over this vessel a piece of plate glass approximately two 
feet square, about one foot from the top of the vessel. This 
permits free circulation of the air, but prevents the entrance 
of rain into the vessel proper. 

These evaporation gauges are fitted with hook gauges and 
are carefully calibrated. The number of cubic centimeters 
of water required to fill an inch is determined and each 
morning at eight o'clock the quantity of water required to 
again bring the elevation of the water to the proper elevation 
of the hook gauge is noted, and from the constants deter- 
mined in the calibration the inches of evaporation is ob- 
tained. 

The land gauge is located in the open about fifty feet 
from shore and probably at an elevation ten feet above the 
water surface of the reservoir. 

In case the record is lost for any particular day, due to 
high winds or malicious tampering with the gauges, the 
record for that particular day is averaged upon the record 
for the month. 

The results of the ninteen years' records in monthly and 
yearly averages are given in Table No. 20. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 



97 



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98 Mayor Grace's Annual Reznew 

IMPROVEMENTS AND EXTENSIONS— 
HANAHAN PUMPING STATION 

It will be recalled that in June 1919 a special report pro- 
posing a systematic program of improvements to the 
pumping station and distribution system was adopted. 
Under this program of improvements there have been com- 
pleted to date the new filter plant, installation of a new 
high service pumping engine, the replacement of the engine 
room wooden floor with concrete, and a portion of the 
proposed duplication of 24'^ discharge main from the pump- 
ing station to the city, together with the improvement of 
the service in the western section of the city, by the con- 
struction of a 16'^ pipe line from Mt. Pleasant Street south- 
ward. It was, therefore, deemed advisable to consider the 
next improvement of most vital importance and a report 
was submited to you under date of June 19, 1923 recom- 
mending the installation of a new intake from the impound- 
ing reservoir to supply the low service pumps, and the in- 
stallation of a new low service pumping engine of ten million 
gallons capacity. 

It was proposed to construct a new concrete intake on 
the shore of the impounding reservoir and dredge from 
this point to the original channel of the creek an open 
channel. From the proposed intake there was extended a 
30'^ pipe to connect with the existing 30'' pipe from the 
old intake, and upon completion the pipe line leading to 
the old intake would be permanently disconnected. The 
new intake was to be designed so as to, at all times, take 
water from the surface of the reservoir and was to be ar- 
ranged so that as the water in the reservoir receded the 
crest of the w^ir at inlet to the intake could be low^ered. 

The approximate estimate of the cost of this work was 
$16,513.60 made up as follows: 

Shoring and excavation of intake crib proper $ 568.60 

Excavations 1,290.00 

Concrete in place 1,907.00 

Screens and stop logs 768.50 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 99 

Approach channel from intake to original creek channel.. 5,300.00 
30" pipe from new intake to junction wiuh old intake line, 

including intersectng manhole 3,679.50 

Incidentals and contingencies — Small tools, etc 1,500.00 

Engineering 1,500.00 

TOTAL. $16,513.60 

At the June meeting, 1923, of the Commission the De- 
partment was authorized to proceed with this work with 
its own forces, and the work was commenced early in July, 
or just as soon as the necessary material and construction 
plant could be assembled. At the first of the year the con- 
crete intake chamber proper was completed, together with 
the approach channel, and there remained only the connect- 
ing link of 30'' pipe with inter esecting manhole at junction 
with the old intake pipe. The total expenditure to the first 
of the year was $10,246.07, and it was estimated that 70% 
of the work was completed and 60% of the expenditures 
made. 

LOW SERVICE PUMPING ENGINE. 

The question of installing a low service pumping engine 
was carefully considered, and we were authorized to prepare 
plans and obtain bids on a Vertical, Triple Expansion, Low 
Service Pumping Engine of ten million gallons capacity. 
Preliminary plans were completed and bids were received 
from the AUis-Chalmers Company, of Milwaukee and the 
Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation of New York 
and were considered at the meeting in October. The Chair- 
man and Manager and Engineer was authorized to proceed 
with the closing of a contract with either of these companies, 
based upon which ultimately developed to be the most ad- 
vantageous from engineering and cost considerations. 

After carefully considering all of the engineering fea- 
tures, floor space occupied and price, contract was awarded 
to the Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation of 
New York, for a ten million gallon Vertical, Triple Ex- 
pansion Pumping Engine having 14 inch high pressure, 24 
inch intermediate and 36 inch low pressure steam cylinders ; 



100 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

direct connected to single acting plunger pumps of 25 inch 
diameter, and a common stroke of 24 inches. The contract 
was signed November 21, 1923 for shipment to be made 
in five months. 

The estimated cost of this improvement to pumping plant 
is as follows : 

10 Million Gallon Low Service, Vertical, Triple Expansion 

Engine, delivered and erected on foundation $46,511.00 

Foundations, including excavation and razing of present 

low service pump, and removing of engine room floor... 1,155.00 

Replacing engine room floor 625.00 

Suction, discharge and steam piping 2,760.00 

Incindentals and contingencies 1,500.00 

Engineering 1,000.00 

TOTAL $53,551.00 

It is expected to have this engine erected and in operation 
by the early summer. With this installation we will have 
a complete modern plant of undoubted high efficiency. 

IMPROVEMENTS TO BOILER FURNACES. 

It was necessary to make some repairs to the boiler set- 
tings of the: three, two hundred horse power Stirling Boilers. 
Our experience with the Detrick Arches had been so satis- 
factory that we thought it advisable to take advantage of 
the necessity of repairs and make some changes in our 
boiler settings. 

On account of the small combustion chamber with the 
old setting of the Stirling Boilers it was decided to extend 
the fronts and set the boilers with * 'Dutch Ovens" using 
Detrick flat arches. To reduce the cost of these repairs it 
was determined to use the same boiler front castings that 
were originally installed, so the entire lower or furnace 
portion of the setting was moved forward a distance of 
four feet six and one-half inches and a flat Detrick suspend- 
ed arch eight feet nine inches in length by seven feet in 
width was installed. At the same time a seven foot length 
by six foot width McBurney inclined hand fired stoker and 
Vulcan Soot Blowers were installed. 



Mayor Grace's Anmtal Reviezv 101 

The total cost of these repairs amounted to $5,798.20 of 
which amount $1,432.72 was charged to repairs, the re- 
maining portion to improvements. It is expected that with 
these changes we will be able to effect an economy of from 
five to ten per cent over the old furnace settings. Work 
was completed just after the first of the year, and we have 
not been able to make any comparative tests, although there 
has been a material reduction in the amount of smoke 
produced. 

AREATION OF WATER SUPPLY. 

Analyses made during the summer months showed that 
our raw water supply was devoid of dissolved oxygen. We 
have accounted for this by the fact that our intake pipe 
in the reservoir is submerged some ten feet below the surf- 
ace where the water is free from wind action and the sun- 
light never penetrates. Our new intake, as before stated, is 
arranged to take the water from the surface where there 
will be a maximum of agitation due to wind and plenty of 
sunlight. This, we think, will overcome, in a large measure, 
the deficiency of oxygen in the raw water or at least analy- 
ses so indicate. 

The absence of dissolved oxygen in the filtered water 
supply caused complaints from some of our consumers that 
the water smelt and tasted musty or spoilt, and from others 
that the fish in their aquariums were dying. To overcome 
these troubles we pumped air during the late spring, summer 
and early fall months into the raw water suction wells, efflu- 
ent from fiters and the clear water reservoir. The results 
were only partially successful and very expensive ; and in an 
effort to further improve these conditions we installed in 
the spring of 1923 an areator on the discharge from our 
filters into the clear water basin. This areator was made 
by means of turning the 30'^ effluent pipe upwards bringing 
it to a point about twelve inches above the surface of the 
water in the clear water basin. On this outlet there was 
constructed an umbrella platform approximately twelve and 



102 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

one-half feet in diameter. On the upper surface of this 
platform strips of wood or riffles were fastened, and below 
each riffle a line of holes were bored through the decking. 
All water entering the clear water basin flowed up through 
the center of this umbrella platform and thence over the 
surfa.ce and riffles, and finally a free fall of fifteen inches 
into the clear water basin was obtained by lowering the flow 
line of basin six inches. 

The effect of the water passing over the riffles created a 
vaciuim sucking air up through the small holes bored in the 
deck. The fmal result was that we obtained an average of 
approximately 60% saturation in the filtered water under 
the most adverse conditions when the raw w^ater contained 
no dissolved oxygen, and we were able to dispense with all 
other methods of areation. 

The residt was so gratifying that it has been made a 
permanent feature of the operation, and there is no ad- 
ditional cost other than the first cost of installation as the 
head lost in areation was otherwise lost in friction. 

EXPERIENCE WITH CEMENT LINED 
CAST IRON PIPE 

In 1923 the Department adopted cement lined cast iron 
pipe as the proper material for all future extensions of 
mains, and all extensions m.ade of new pipe during the 
past year were of this class of material. 

In our Sixth Annual Report we gave the results of some 
tests m.ade on 6'^ and 16^' cement lined pipe to determine 
the value of the Coefficient "C" in Hazen's and Williams' 
formula for the flow of water in mains. To supplement 
these tests and further to determine if there had been any 
reduction in these values, the tests were repeated on the 
W^ pipe just one year later. It was not possible, except 
at considerable trouble and expense, to repeat the 6'' tests 
on account of changed paving conditions. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



103 



The original test results and the new results are given 
in the tabulation below : 



VALUE OF COEFFICIENT "C" IN HAZEN'S AND WILLIAMS' FORMULA 

AS DETERMINED FOR CEMENT LINED CAST IRON PIPE. 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 



Flow— 1000 Gallons | 
per 24 hours H 


Velocity in feet 1 Loss of Head in || 
per second ( feet per 1000 feet || 


Value of "C" in 
Hazen's and Wil- 
liams' Formula 


1923 1924 II 


1923 1924 11 1923 1924 || 


1923 1924 


6" 1 16" 1 16" 1] 


6" 1 16" 1 16" II 6" 1 16" 1 16" II 


6" 1 16" 1 16" 



134.4 

185.26 
299.44 



369.45 

457.78 
496.34 



766 



1623 
1726 



768 
1066 
1127 



1342 

1505 



1958 
2100 



1.20 I 0.89 



1.66 




0.89 


2.68 




1.24 
1.31 


3.31 


1.34 




4.11 




1.56 


4.45 




1.75 




1.89 






2.01 










1 2.28 
2.44 



1.08 
2.34 
4.97 

7725 
10.76 
12.55 



II 



0.27 



0.44 



0.77 
0.89 



0.21 
0.41 
0.46 



0.64 
0.80 



1.34 
1.45 
Average .. 



141 


128 




128 




133 


138 




128 

128 


139 


134 




139 




128 


139 




127 




140 







137 


125 

128 



137 



185 



128 



It is noted that there has been an apparent decrease in 
the value of "C" of about 5%. We feel that this reduction 
may be accounted for in the errors of observation and test. 
The section of main tested, 500 feet, included one 16^' valve 
and one 16'''xl6'''xl6''xl6" bell and spigot cross. 

The internal surface of the main shows no growth, tuber- 
culation or rust. 

Standard cast iron pipe uncoated is used in making the 
cement lined pipe. The thickness of cement lining is 3/16^' 
for pipe with nominal diameter four to ten inches and Vh^^ 
for diameters of from twelve to twenty-four inches. 

The department is very much pleased wdth the results of 
these tests, and the action of the pipe in service and especial- 
ly so when compared with the results he'*etOLore obtained 
from standard coated cast iron mains. 

ANNUAL AUDIT. 



Mr. C. L. Vann, Certified Public Accountant, has been 
employed to audit the accounts of the Commission for the 
year 1923, and his report is now ready for your consid- 
eration. 



104 Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv 

APPRECIATION OF COMMISSION AND 
EMPLOYEES 

At the municipal election, December 11, 1923, our former 
Chairman, Mr. J. Ross Hanahan, was elected Alderman 
from the iirst ward and assumed his duty on December 17, 
1923. This made necessary his resignation from the Com- 
mission, and I cannot close this Report without expressing 
my appreciation of the many courtesies, cooperation and 
able advice given me during the years of our association. 
I wish also to express my appreciation to the members of 
the Commission, individually and collectively, for their 
continued support, advice and cooperation. 

To my fellow officers and associates, and to the employees 
of the Commission I wish to express my appreciation for 
their continued support and team work, and have to assure 
them that whatever measure of success has been obtained 
is due to their unstinted cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. E. GIBSON, 

Manager and Engineer. 



Charleston, S. C, January 9, 1924. 

Mr. J . B. Gibson, Mgr. and Bngr., 
Conimissioners of Public Works, 
Charleston, South Carolina. 

Dear Sir: 

I am submitting herewith a report of the status of the 
accounts of the Comniissioners of Public Works for the 
year ending December 31, 1923, for your information. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) E. EARL EVANS, 

Treasurer. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 105 

Sche:dule: "A" 
Financial Report as of December 31, 1923. 

ASSETS 
Current : 

Cash: {See "B") 

General Funds _ _ _ $ 84,139.43 

Petty Cash...._ 200.00 

Treasurer's Account „ _ 200.00 



Bonds : 

Sinking Fund _ 106,276.40 

Depreciation Fund _ „ „.. 39,812.50 



Accounts Receivable : 

Customers' Water _ ^ 18,276.71 

♦Accrued Charges to Customers 30,000.00 

Miscellaneous Accounts (See "F") 11,406.03 



Inventories : 

Stores — Ashley 705.26 

Stores — Hanahan 29,610.79 

Stores— George Street _ 11,220.74 

Tools and Equipment 2,52067 

Autos and Trucks 4,192.35 

Meters — Stores _ 4,112.85 

Engineering Instruments and lyaboratory 

Supplies _ 2,490.00 



Total Plant to date _„ 2,506,367.26 

Office Equipment _ 3,548.00 



84,539.43 



146.088.90 



59,682.74 



54,852.66 



Total Current _ 345.163.73 

Fixed : 

Plant— Original Cost 1,360,000.00 

Additions to Plant, 1917 3,490.25 

Additions to Plant, 1918 118,328.93 

Additions to Plant, 1919 101,329.08 

Additions to Plant, 1920 657,408.65 

Additions to Plant, 1921 _ 85,173.76 

Additions to Plant, 1922 „ 131,392.83 

Additions to Plant 1923 (See "H") 49,243.76 



Total Fixed 2,509.915.26 

Deferred : 

Prepaid Insurance _ _ 1,419.88 

**Services — Water. ^ 543.60 



Total Deferred 1,963.48 



Total Assets 2,857,042.47 



* This item represents estimated value of water supplied to customers through 
meters which have not been read. These nneters will be read during the months 
of January, February and March, 1924. 

** Several water services have been installed in anticipation of the need of 
same. These will be paid for by consumers who apply for them in the future. 



106 Mayor Grace's Annual Rroiciif 

LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 

Current : 

Accounts Payable (See "G") _ __$ 1,486.78 

Total Current _ 1,48678 

Fixed : 

Interest on Bonds 16,278.75 

Deposits — Guarantee for water bills 13,724.89 

Total Fixed- 30,003.64 

Bonds: 

City of Charleston, S. C 1,447.000.00 



1,447,000.00 



Reserves : 

Depreciation (See "M") 208,692.37 

Sinking Fund (See "L") _ 111,978.28 

Insurance 3,752.79 

Interest on Government Loan 5,524.97 

Total Reserves „ „.. 329,948.41 

Deferred : 

U. S. Government (Ashley River 

Extension) 252,458.50 

Chlorine Cylinders (Electro Bleaching 

Gas Company)- 420.00 

Real Estate Contracts (See "K") 27,140.57 



Total Deferred 280.019.07 



Total Liabilities 2,088,457.90 

Surplus: {See "C") 

Total Surplus to date 768,584.57 

Total Liabilities and Surplus 2.857.042.47 



Schedule ''B" 
Statement of Earnings and Expfnses for Year 1923. 

EXPENSES 

Distribution System: 

Operation — — $ 3,881.82 

Maintenance _ ^ 15,553.75 



Plant: 

Operation-- ^ 67,537.73 

Maintenance — - 16, 165. 10 



19.435.57 



83,702.83 



General: 39,656.72 

Total Operating Expenses 142,795.12 

Fixed Charges: 

Interest on Bonds — 65,115.00 

Interest on Government Loan 10,893.30 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 107 

Sinking Fund . 15,785.16 

Depreciation » 22,716.00 

Special Insurance 1,000.00 

Interest on Surplus Invested in Plant 32,085.00 

. 147,594.46 

Bxtraordina/ry Expenses : 14,147.64 

Total Expenses- 304,537.22 

Net Earnings to Surplus • — . 126,484.73 

431.021.95 

EARNINGS 

Water— Net...„._ _ 379,482.70 

Rent - ™ 1,729.00 

Interest on Deposits - 3,857. 16 

Interest on Surplus Invested in Plant 32,085.00 

Sales — Supplies and By-Products — — 139 60 

Testing Meters „ _ 10.00 

Fees for Turning on Water. _. _^ 658.00 

Rental of Truck __ _ __ 1,568.22 

Discounts Earned „ _ 164.63 

Miscellaneous — — 11,327.64 



Total Gross Earnings _ 431,021.95 

(For detailed statement of above see Schedule "I") 

Schedule "H" 

Improvements and Betterments to Plant 
October 1, 1917 to December 31, 1923. 

New mains, hydrants and valves Installed $ 210,070.99 

Improvements to 20" & 24" pumping mains 11,322.00 

New consumers meters installed, 89,919 77 

Condensation receiver, .— . 135.00 

Venturi meters, 2,380.84 

Pumping machinery „ 632.35 

Chlorinating plant _ 554.91 

New dam at Hanahan „ 98,124.91 

Stand pipe and piping, _ 9,280.07 

Engine room floor concrete, „ 9,279.57 

New Filters „ _ 1 16,845.09 

Cottage No. 5, — - „ _.. 2,830.67 

Alterations to Hanahan Pumping Station, 2,407.15 

Ashley River extension, _ 496,089.41 

Land purchased (including cost of surveying & plotting) 27,626.05 

New Engine No. 3, ..... 39,998.51 

Duplicate discharge piping, 6,279.34 

Independent discharge to Engine No. 1, 1,191.53 

New intake, 10,246.07 

Lighting plant _ 2,484 94 

Boiler Furnaces, . 3,728.20 

Miscellaneous improvements, „ 38,668.18 



Total imi^rovements, ._41,180,09SSS 



108 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

De:ductions from Plant 

Old tub filters charged off on account of obsolescence, 18,000.00 

Old Engine No. 3 charged off on account of obsolescence, 3,200.00 

Wood pipe removed on account of obsolescence,™ 6,840.00 

Material previously charged to Plant, recovered and placed 

in Stores or sold, 5,688.29 



Total Deductions 33,728.29 



Net Increase to Plant, _ $1,146,367.26 



Improvements and Betterments During 1923. 

New mains, hydrants and valves installed, 27,988.44 

New consumers meters installed, 2,194.55 

Engine room floor concrete, 564.01 

Land purchaser, (cost of surveying & plotting) 1,106.30 

New Intake _ _ 10,246.07 

Lighting plant, _ „ 2,484.94 

Boiler furnaces, _ 3,728.20 

Miscellanceous improvements, 931.25 

Total Improvements, .$ 49,243.76 

Schedule "L" 

SINKING FUND: 

Amount which should be in this account as shown in 

Schedule "A" $ 111,978.28 

Amount Actually in this Fund: 

BONDS. Par Value. Book Value. 

26 Water Works Bonds, Num- 
bers 1422 to 1447, inclusive, 
4y2%, due October 1 ,1957...-$26,000.00 $ 26,000.00 

26 Water Works Bonds, Num- 
bers 761 to 786, inclusive 
4^%, due October 1, 1957 26,000.00 24,700.00 

25 City of Greenville, S. C. Bonds, 
Numbers 1 to 25, .inclusive, 

5%, due 1961 25,000.00 25.125.00 

3 City of Anderson, S. C, 
Bonds, Numbers 13 to 15, in- 
clusive, street paving. 

5%, due May 1, 1945 

5 City of Anderson, S. C, Bonds, 
Numbers 59 to 63, inclusive, 
permanent improvement, 5%, 

due May 1, 1945 — 8,000.00 8,274.40 

7 City of Anderson, S. C, Bonds, 
Numbers 41 to 47, inclusive, 
street paving, 5%, due March 
1, 1947 — - - 7,000.00 7,252.00 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 109 



30 City of Charleston, S. C. 
Bonds , Numbers 1 to 30, in- 
clusive, 4j/2%, due April 1, 
1928 _ -- 15,000.00 14,925.00 



107,000.00 106,276.40 
Cash' 
South Carolina Loan and Trust 

Account - 5,701.88 

Total „ _ $111,978.28 

Schedule **M" 
DEPRECIATION FUND 

Amount which should he in this ac- 
count, as shown in Schedule A $208,692.37 

Amount actually in this funds 

BONDS. Par Value- Book Value. 

10 City of Florence, S. C, School 

District Bonds, Numbers 142 

to 151, inclusive 5^/4% due 

April 15 1955 - -10,000.00 10,300.00 

10 City of Charleston Water 

Works Bonds, numbers 1386 

to 1395, inclusive, 4^% due 

October 1, 1957 10,000.00 9,950.00 

15 City of Charleston Water 

Works Bonds, numbers 832 

to 846, inclusive, 4><%, due 

October 1, 1957 15,000.00 14,700.00 

5 City of Charleston Water 

Bonds, numbers 1401 to 

1405 ,inclusive, 4^%, due 

October 1, 1957 5,000.00 4,862.50 

40,000.00 39.812.50 
Cash, 
South Carolina Loan and Trust 

Company account 47,132.62 

Portion of the cost of the Ashley 
River Extension borne by the 
U. S. Government 121,747.25 

(This extension is carried on the 
books at its full cost; therefore, 
above amount has been set 
as a reserve to offset the por- 
tion of cost not borne by the 
Commission.) 

Total 208,692.37 



110 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 
CITY ABATTOIR 



Mr. Clifford Thompson, 
Clerk of Council. 

Dear Sir: — Attached you will find tabulations covering killing 
records for Year 1923, found on books here, also income, expendi- 
tures and appropriations, given me by Mr. Smith, City Treasurer. 

Yours Truly, 

D. S. MOTT, 

Superintendent City Abattoir. 



INCOME 1923 

January 31st $ 1,883.73 

February 28th 1,703.64 

March 31st 1,647.96 

April 30th - 1,964.78 

May 31st 1,709.60 

Tune 30th 1,509.40 

July 31st 894.97 

August 31st 651.83 

September 30th ..._ 1,077.95 

October 31st 1,559.86 

November 30th 1,837.84 

December 31st ...: 3,164.76 



$19,606.22 

EXPENDITURES 

Director $ 3,000.40 

Superintendent 1,984.56 

Clerk 520.00 

Butchers, Etc 5,641.98 

Officers _ 97.46 

1923 Cattl 

January 518 

February 482 

March 540 

April ...._ 415 

May - 416 

June 361 

July 268 

August 385 

September 381 

October -.- 484 

November 346 

December 372 



Stationery & Printing.... 205.63 

Water 987.27 

Electric Current 803.63 

Miscellaneous — 228.42 

Hauling 37.60 

Supplies 1,094.65 

Repairs 4,588.87 

Advertising 124.00 

Insurance 1,306.33 

Automobiles 294.62 

System _ 45.00 

Legal & Attorney Fees.... 180.00 

Telephone 83.60 

Fuel _.. 1,118.36 

Power _ 403.23 

Handling Cattle - 

Shipments 1,000.00 

Refriperation 1,250.00 

Analysis _. 20.00 

$25,015.06 

Turn-back to income 359.58 



3 Appropriations 


~ - 


....$25,474.64 


Calves 


Dicks Hogs Lambs Goats 


Total 


214 


8 


1465 


1 


13 


2219 


276 


6 


1118 


3 


8 


1893 


351 


6 


1105 


20 


9 


2031 


284 


3 


325 


153 


5 


1185 


369 


1 


183 


156 


1 


1126 


365 


12 


72 


163 


8 


981 


310 


28 


41 


76 


14 


737 


354 


17 


80 


120 


18 


974 


348 


11 


245 


81 




1066 


367 


10 


909 


79 


11 


1860 


240 


11 


1201 


61 


19 


1878 


218 


6 


1129 


14 


15 


1754 



4968 3696 119 7S73 927 121 17704 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 111 

REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Mayor and City Council 
of the City of Charleston, S. C. 

I have the honor to submit for your consideration, the 
details of the business of this office for the year ending 
December 31st, 1923. 

The total number of permits issued was 274, of which 
99 were for new construction and 175 for repairs. The 
classification of the buildings is as follows ; 

RESIDENTIAL BUIEDINGS no. estimated cost 

One family residences 72 $182,150.00 

Two family residences 2 5,600.00 

Combination store and dwelling 1 1,500.00 

Hotel — 1 400,000.00 

Dormitories 1 44,222,00 

NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS 

Gymnasiums _ _. 1 52,000.00 

Churches _ 5 41,785.00 

Garages, Public .•. __ 2 10,000.00 

Garages, Private 5 920.00 

Gasoline Service Stations _ 1 4,500.00 

Office Buildings _.. 1 11,500.00 

Public Works and Utilities 2 563,430.00 

Schools __ 2 14,750.00 

Sheds 2 230.00 

Stables 1 175.00 

Stores 10 14,735.00 

Cooling Tower _ 1 150.00 

REPAIRS 

On Residential Buildings 110 $ 55.675.00 

On Non-Residential Buildings 57 185,691.00 

Signs, etc 12 2,025.00 

The total estimated cost of the buildings for which permits were 
issued was $1,547,238.00 of which $1,383,959.00 was for new construc- 
tion and $163,279.00 for repairs. The itemized list of permits issued 
by months is as follows: 



112 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



BUILDING PERMITS — CHARLESTON, S. C. 
JANUARY 1, 1923 to JANUARY 1, 1924. 







NEW 


] 


REPAIRS 




TOTAL 




^5 


5 
ll 


o i 


-a 
ll 


^1 


1 

ll 


January — 

Brick Buildinpra 

Frame Buildings 


10 


$ 8.715.00 


2 
11 


$ 518.00 
4,905.00 


2 
21 


$ 518.00 
13.620.00 


Total 

February — 

Brick Building3 

Frame Buildings 


10 

1 
14 

15 

1 

7 


8,715.00 

500.00 
43,950.00 


13 

7 
10 


5.423.00 

19.750.00 
4.280.00 


23 

8 
24 


14,138.00 

20,250.00 
48,230.00 


Total _._ 

March — 

Brick Buildings — 

Frame Buildings 


44.450.00 

3,000.00 
8,700.00 


17 

8 
13 


24.030.00 

20.600.00 
4.425.00 


32 

9 
20 


68.480.00 

23.600.00 
13.125.00 


Total 

April- 
Brick Buildings 

Frame Building 


8 

8 

4 

7 

1 
10 


11.700.00 

465.500.00 
11,800.00 


21 

2 
11 


25.025.00 

5.150.00 
3.540.00 


29 

6 
15 


36,725.00 

470,650.00 
15,340.00 


Total 

May- 
Brick Buildings 

Frame Rnildings 


477.300.00 

18,792.00 
15,525.00 


13 

6 
12 


8.690.00 

5.115.00 
4.205.00 


20 

7 
22 


485,990.00 

23,907.00 
19,730.00 




Total 

June — 

Brick Buildings 


11 


34,317.00 


18 

10 
6 


9.320.00 

36,744.00 
3.530.00 


29 

10 
14 


43.637.00 

36,744.00 
12,780.00 


Frame Buildings ..._ „ _. 


8 


9,250.00 


Total 

July- 
Brick Buildings 

Frame Buildings 


8 

2 
3 


9,250.00 

15,000.00 
66.175.00 


16 

4 

7 


40.274.00 

16,525.00 
2,520.00 


24 

6 
10 


49,524.00 

31,525.00 

68,695.00 


Total _ _.. 

August — 
Brick Buildings 


5 

3 

4 


81,175.00 

62,100.00 
10,450.00 


11 

2 
9 


19,045.00 

2,150.00 
2.100.00 


16 

5 
13 


100,220.00 
64,250.00 


Frame Buildings 


12,550.00 


Total -. 

September — 

Brick Buildings 


7 

2 
5 


72,550.00 

510,930.00 
5,700.00 


11 

3 

12 


4,250.00 

3,500.00 
3,585.00 


18 

5 
17 


76,800.00 
514,430.00 


Frame Buildings 


9,285.00 


Total 

October- 
Brick Buildings 

Frame Buildings . . . 


7 

2 
9 


516,630.00 

38,000.00 
22,965.00 


15 

4 
13 


7,085.00 

4,322.00 
4.650.00 


22 

6 
22 


523,715.00 

42,322.00 
27,615.00 


Total 

November — 


11 


60.965.00 
'l'5.700.'00 


17 

5 
10 


8,972.00 

4.040.00 
3,050.00 


28 

5 
14 


69,937.00 
4,040.00 


Frame Buildings 


4 

4 

1 
5 


18,750.00 


Total.. 
December — 

Brick Buildings 

Frame Buildings 


15.700.00 

44,222.00 
6,985.00 


15 

4 
4 


7,090.00 

3,300.00 
775.00 


19 

5 
. 9 


22,790.00 

47,522.00 
7,760.00 


Total 


6 


51,207.00 


8 


4,075.00 


14 


55,282.00 





99 


$1,383,959.00 


175 


$163,279.00 


274 


$ 1,547,238.00 




1 











Mayor Grace's Annual Review 113 

The appropriation for this office for the year was $2,675.00 which 
was expended as follows : 

Salary __ $2,400.00 

Stationery and transportation 91. 50 

Expenses to Building Officials Conference.... 175.00 



Total _ - 2,666.50 



Unexpended Balance -$ 8.50 

The amount collected by this office for the year was $156.00. 

I have furnished the County Assessor's Office with copies 
of permits issued from time to time for the purpose of 
facilitating the business of his office. Also different Govern- 
ment bureaus have been furnished with the monthly figures 
as compiled by this office. Several private firms who are 
engaged in the compiling of nation wide statistics have also 
been furnished with these figures. 

In January 1923, I was requested by City Engineer Din- 
gle to make an itemized estimate of repairs necessary for 
the Charleston Museum. I prepared this estimate and later 
carried out the repairs specified. 

On April 24th, I attended the Conference of Building 
Officials at Toledo, Ohio. Active membership in this Con- 
ference is limited to Officers charged with the enforcement 
of Building Laws, and associate membership is granted to 
manufacturers of building materials. 

This Conference was well attended by men from most 
of the important Cities in the country, and the questions 
discussed were of the utmost importance to the building in- 
dustry, the principal one of which was to my mind the prop- 
er arrangement of a uniform building code. At this Con- 
ference I was appointed membf^r of a Committee on the 
uses of Lime in Construction. 

During the year I have continued to act as "Special 
Agent" in the Employment Division of the Department of 
Labor. 

Hoping this report will meet with your approval, I am, 

Yours respectfully, 

JAMES COLES, 
Building Inspector. 



114 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

REPORT OF CITY ELECTRICIAN 



To the Mayor and Aldermen 

of the City of Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : 

I beg" leave to submit for your consideration my Report 
on lighting the streets of the City of Charleston, for the 
year 1923. 

Lighting the City. 

The streets of the city are now lighted with 629-600 
candle power type ''C" street light, 442 automatic Gas 
lights of 60 candle (normal) power, 6-32 candle power 
series incandescent lights, and the ornamental lights on 
King Street from Broad to Line Streets. 

During the year we installed 122 additional Type "C" 
street lights, and we discontinued 72> automatic Gas lights. 

STATEMENT OF LIGHTING ACCOUNT. 

629 Type "C" Street Light $29,638.75 

Deduction, per Police Report 28.06 

Amount paid $29,610.79 

442 Gas Street light $13,820.78 

Deduction per Police Report 43.08 

Amount paid $13,777.70 

Ornamental lighting King Street from Broad to Line Streets 5,620.08 

Material for Boulevard lighting 2,696.70 

6-Series Lights 180.00 

Miscellaneous _ 165.79 

$52,050.96 

Appropriation $54,249.75 

Expenditures _ _ 52,050.96 

Balance to income acct $ 3,198.79 

Electric Wires. 

There has been a great deal of work done by the Char- 
leston Consolidated Railway and Lighting Company dur- 
ing the year on account of the abutment property law, such 
as moving poles inside of the curb line. Th Southern Bell 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 115 

Telephone and Telegraph Company has been doing the same 
work on account of the abutment law. 

There has been a great deal of repair work done on the 
electric and telephone lines during the year. 

The Charleston Consolidated Railway and Lighting Com- 
pany have done a great deal of track work during the year 
and same has been inspected by the Department in regards 
to the bonding of the rails. 

Inspe:ctions of Theatres. 

Under the ordinance this department has inspected the 
moving picture houses and theatres and examined the elec- 
trical apparatus used in same. 

Municipal Inspection. 

During the year this department issued 1,138 permits to 
do electrical construction, made 1,821 inspections including 
old and new installations, issued 858 certificates covering 
8,455 incandescent lights, 77 cut in, 116 meter loops, 42 
re-wiring, 9 fans, 1 generator, and 101 motors (eqivalent 
to 572 1-2 horse power). 

Temporary permits 27, certificates 27, and inspections 27 , 
covering 644 incandescent lights, 3 picture machines and 9 
motors (equivalent to 58 horse power) 

Statement of Examining Board. 

Expenditures $ 8.50 

Appropriation $10.00 

Expenditures 8.50 



Balance to income account . $ 1.50 

Statement of Inspection Account. 

Salary City Electrician „ $ 2,100.00 

Salary of Asst. City Electrician _ 1,400.00 

Salary of Eineman . _.. „ 1,200.00 

$ 4,700.00 

Supplies, sundries and wire - 2,114.53 

Labor __ _ 356.96 

Miscellaneous 1 18.50 

$ 7,299.99 



116 Mayor Grace's Annual Rrdicw 

Appropriation $ 7,300.00 

Expenditures _ 7,299.99 

Balance to income account $ 01 

Police Alarm Telegraph System. 

During the year the Police Alarm Telegraph Switchboard 
known as Type "B" open circuit has given perfect satisfac- 
tion as will be seen by the number of calls that were received 
during the year. There has been minor repairs made to the 
board during the year. We have had a great deal of trouble 
keeping this system going on account of the amount of work 
that has been done by the Charleston Consolidated Raihvay 
and lighting Company and the Southern Bell Telephone and 
Telegraph Company in moving thir poles inside of the curb 
line on account of the abutment law. 

CALLS RECEIVED OVER THE SYSTEM 

Telephone calls 83,748 

Wagon calls 5,716 

Total calls 89,464 

Very respectfully submitted, 

TON SIMONS, 

City Electrician. 

R. L. RODGERS, Chairman, 

Committee on Electric Wires. 



METER INSPECTION. 



From records available at this date, it appears the fol- 
lowing inspection of gas, electric and water meters were 
made from December 28, 1922, to January 1, 1924: 

Gas 191 ; Electric 61 ; water 12 ; total 264. 



C. C. SCHIRMER, Jr. 

City Electrician. 



May 1, 1924. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 117 

CITY PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



Charleston, S. C, January 8th, 1924. 

To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen 

of City Council, Charleston, S. C. 

Dear Sirs : 

I beg leave to submit, for your consideration, my report 
for the year 1923 : 

During the year there were issued : 

403 Plumbing Permits. 

166 Sewer Permits. 
5 Final Certificates. 

725 Inspections of old and new work. 

121 No sidewalk connections. 

43 Paid connections, $15.00 each $ 645.00 

36 Master Plumbers Licenses, $50.00 each 1,800.00 

Statement of Plumbing Inspector's account : 

T. F. Carey, Salary, Jan. 1st, 1923, to Dec. 

31st, 1923 $2,100.00 

Car tickets and Office supplies 100.00 

Appropriation $2,200.00 

Expenditures ; 2,200.00 

Balance 0.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. F. CAREY, 

Plumbing Inspector. 



118 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reinciv 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Report of the Chief of Police to the Mayor and City 
Council for the year ending December 31, 1923: 



Amt. of Fines 
Imposed 
at Police Court 

January $ 1,908.00 

February _ 1,831.00 

March 1,77200 

April 1,967.00 

May -.. 2,092.00 

June _ 1,591.00 

July 1,930.00 

August 1,724.00 

September 2,255 00 

October 3,152.00 

November 1,491.00 

December 1,783.00 



Amt. of Fines 

Paid by 

Prisoners 

$ 1,49600 

1,147.00 

1,110.00 

1,115.00 

1,098.00 

994.00 

1,397.50 

1,208.00 

1,409.00 

2,632.00 

1,121.00 

1,463.00 



Amt. of Forfeitures 
Deducted from 
Pay of Police for 
Lost Time 
$ 423.66 
161.91 
203.84 
174.11 
134 30 
239 27 
137.00 
215.99 
190.14 
211.88 
1&4.79 
71.48 



Totah 



"$23^496"00 "$i6il9a50 "%"2,m.Z7 

DISPOSITION OF PRISONERS 



White 



Bail Forfeited 

Dismissed _ „ 

Delivered to Magistrate.... 

Delivered to Warrant 

Delivered to Coroner 

Delivered to Chain Gang 

Sent to Hospital 153 

Sent to Jail 24 

Delivered to other States 2 
Sent to Juvenile Court.... 
Sent to U.S. Commissioner 1 



Males 

310 

683 

38 

10 

10 

124 



Females 

27 

42 

5 



21 



18 

5 









Colored 
Males Females 



463 

440 

110 

14 

22 

255 

304 

29 









94 

118 

2>7 

2 

9 



158 

149 

2 

1 





Totals 

894 

1,283 

190 

26 

62 

379 

633 

203 

4 

1 

1 



Totals 1,355 



118 



1.633 



570 



3,676 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Still Alarms 5 

Calls sent in by Police 81,684 

Prisoners brought in by Patrol 3,692 

Prisoners brought in by Police 167 

Reported Cases 157 

Times Miles 

Alarms responded to by Police 4,588 9,176 

Auto sent to Jail with Prisoners 250 500 

Auto sent to Magistrate's Court 162 324 

Wagon sent on Special Calls - 635 1,270 

Auto sent to Fire - 129 258 

Auto sent to Hospital 603 1,206 

Auto sent -on Special Calls - - - 7,428 14,856 



13,795 



27.590 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



119 



PROPERTY RECOVERED AND DISPOSED OF 

January $ 1,669.80 

February 263.00 

March 2,877.50 

April 2,071.55 

May 1,391.70 

June _ 984.75 

July 1,600.00 

August 2,000.88 

September _ 1,540.00 

October , 1,192.91 

November 1,762.60 

December 2,208.41 



$19,563.10 

Taken Up, Running at Large — 1 Calf, 4 Ponies, 2 Kids, 45 
Horses, 51 Goats, 16 Mules, 9 Dogs, 2 Cows, 1 Colt, 1 Bull. 

Shot at Owner's Request — 62 Dogs, 13 Horses, 2 Mules, 1 Cow, 
3 Cats. 

Found Open, Owner NotiEied, Same Secured — 1 Filling Station, 
24 Stores, 13 offxes, 2 Banks, 3 Laundries, 1 Theatre, 1 Garage. 

RECORDS OF ARRESTS FOR 1923. 





White 


Colored 


1 

il 


OFFENCES. 


J 


1 


13 
1^ 




Assault 


6 

13 

6 


i 

2 


2 

52 

1 

-^ 

2 


8 

20 

2 
1 
2 


11 


Assault Aggravated 


86 


Allowing Dog to Bite 

Allowing Dog to Run at Large 


11 
1 




1 

1 

2 

177 




5 


Assaulting Police 

Allowing Monkey to Bite— - - 


„ 


3 
2 


Applied for Lodging 

Burglary 


24 
2 

1 

4 

1 

89 

7 

837 

29 

194 

168 

1 

22 

8 

1 

9 

119 

74 

97 

10 

12 





201 
2 


Burglary and Larceny 


1 

5 

2 

401 

4S 

176 

89 

1 

8 

9 

1 

2 

78 

33 

28 

7 

11 




2 


Burglary and Grand Larceny 





4 
2 


Carrying Concealed Weapons 


26 

11 
3 

11 
16 

10 
4 
5 

2 
2 


4 

" 70 

5 

124 

96 

12 

32 

1 
39 
22 
63 

3 
29 


48 
9 


Detained — 


834 


Drunk 


77 


Drunk and Disorderly 


505 
356 


Disorderly Houses 

DiDsorderly Persons 


25 
73 


Driving Auto under influence of Liquor 

Destroying City Property 

Found Killed 

Found Sick - 


12 
3 

14 
246 
133 


Found Wounded 

Found Dead 


193 
20 


Found Insane 

Found Scalded . 


54 
2 






3 

1 
1 





3 


Found Burnt 






1 


Found Overcome by Gas — 


1 





2 



120 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviczv 



RECORDS OF ARREST FOR 1923. 


— (Continued.) 








2 





1 

11 

113 

2 

4 
7 
1 

1 
1 

■"27 
28 
14 

1 

1 
13 

1 
16 

4 


1 

1 

11 

1 


2 
2 


Firinp- Firp Arms 







12 


Gambling - 





124 


House Breaking and Larceny 




2 


House Breaking and Grand Larceny _ 

Highway Robbery . 


5 

1 


13 


Hauling Women for Immoral Purposes 


1 
9 
8 
2 




Impersonating an Officer .,_ 

K eping a Gambling House.. 

Keeping a Disorderly House 


1 
1 

1 







T.aropny Potty 






86 


Larceny, Grand ._ 

Lndfed on Warrant , , 


11 
10 

1 

2 


1 
6 

~ 1 


48 
32 




2 


Mutilating Tres 

Reckless Driving 


2 



3 

16 

1 




6 
5 
1 
1 
1 







22 




9 


Sending in False Alarms 





1 


Selling Drugs without License 

Selling without Standard Measure _ 


2 

4 
9 





1 
3 





4 


Unlawful Weapons 

Violation License Law 


1 

1 
1 
1 




10 




1 


Violation Section 243 






1 


Violation Section 704 .._ 

Violation Criminal Code 606 ... 


1 





1 
1 


Violation Sunday Law 


1 
2 

198 






1 


Violation Board of Health 




161 

1 
1 


4 


2 


Violation Traffic Law 


15 


378 


Violation Prohibition Law 


1 


Violating Plumbing Law 


3 


4 



1355| 118|| 1,633| 570|| 3.676 



I certify that the foregoing is a correct Report as per 
Recorder's Morning Reports. 

THOS. P. RUTLEDGE, 

Chief of Police 



Official : 

MRS. O. W. COLLINS, 

Asst. Clerk of Police Department. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reznew 121 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE-MASTERS 



Office of Board of F^ire-Masters, 
Charleston, S. C, January 1, 1924. 

To the Honorable the Mayor and City Council, 
of Charleston, S. C. 

The Board of Fire-Masters respectfully submit the opera- 
tion of this Department for the year 1923, and its condition 
at this date, as contained in the annexed statements : 

The Force of the Department. 

Condensed Expenses. 

Summary of Expenses by Companies. 

Inventory of Property and Location of Same. 

Amounts drawn from City Treasurer from 1st January, 
1882, to 31st December, 1923, and actual cost of maintain- 
ing the Department for Forty-Two Years. 

Comparative Statement of Property at Risk, Insurance 
and Loss. . 

Report of Chief to the Board. 

Report of Lineman Fire Alarm Telegraph to the Board. 

Report of Surgeon to the Board. 

Report of Treasurer of the Pension Fund. 

JOHN H. STEENKEN, 
Chairman, Board of Fire-Masters. 



THE FORCE AND EQUIPMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT, 
DECEMBER 31, 1923. 

108 Officers and Men. 

7 Steam Fire Engines. 

3 Motor Triple Combination Pumping Engines, 

1 Motor Combination Pumping Engine and Hose Wagon. 

1 Motor Combination Chemical, Hose Wagon, and Tractor. 

2 Motor Cycles. 

1 Chemical Engine. 

13,700 Feet Serviceable 2^/2 inch Hose. 

800 Feet Serviceable IVo inch Hose. 

2,150 Feet Chemical Hose. 

1 Deluge and Cellar Pipe. 

2 Monitor Nozzles. 

1 Lungmotor 

2 Fuel Wagons. 
2 Carts. 



122 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviczv 



2 


Combination Hose Wagons. 


7 


Hose Wagons. 


2 


Aerial Truck and Equipment. 


1 


Truck and Equipment. 


2 


Life-nets. 


24 


Extinguishers. 


4 


Tarpaulins. 


2 


Automobiles. 


5 


Smoke Helmets. 


13 


Horses. 


1 


Training Tower, with complete equipment. 


3 


Alarm Bells, 158 Fire Alarm Boxes, and Complete System 




of Fire Alarin Telegraph. 


1 


Motor Truck, Fire Alarm Telegraph. 



CONDENSED EXPENSES OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 
JANUARY 1st to DECEMBER 31st, 1923. 

Pay Roll $135,430.98 

Forage 1,962.35 

Coal and Wood 1,748.96 

Horse Shoeing and Medicine 378.00 

Synchronizing Clock 15.00 

Light and CuiTent „ 464.96 

Saw Dust *. 22.00 

Telephones 633.72 

Bed Clothing 415.66 

New Bedsteads 616.25 

Renewing Mattresses 237.00 

Surgeon 400.00 

Rubber Boots - 486.25 

Medical Attention to Horses 45.00 

Ice for all Stations 112.50 

Chief's Expenses to Convention 203.90 

Insurance --- 19.20 

Hose and Suctions 3,335.79 

Soda and Acid 142.78 

Painting Houses 582.07 

Fire Alarm Boxes 514.00 

Printing and Stationery 640.02 

Contingent Fund \ 718.85 

Gongs for Assistant Chief's Residence 103.58 

One Horse ($115.00 and one old Horse in exchange) 115.00 

Battery Plates 300.00 

Wire Fire Alami Telegraph 558.54 

Poles, Labor, Fire Alarm Telegraph 298.54 

Renewing Switchboard 251.50 

Repairs due to unavoidable accident to Automobile 373.55 

Repairs to Queen Street Reserve House 600.00 

Two Indian Fire Apparatus 1 513.00 

Part payment upon 75 foot Motor Aerial Truck 8,350.00 

Jars, Fire Alarm Telegraph 25.20 

$161,614.15 



Mayor Grace's Animal Review 123 

Renewals — 

Oil, Waste and Engine Supplies $1,672.35 

Repairs Chief and Assistant's Automobile 121.26 

New Tires Chief and Assistant's Automobile..- 123.68 

Repairs to Apparatus 2,818.22 

Repairs to Houses 1,292.69 

Repairs to Harness 21.40 

Repairs to Heaters 129.86 

6,179.46 

Amount Expended $167,793.61 

Appropriation Fire Department $168,370.72 

Amount Expended $167,793.61 

Balance unexpended returned to Treasurer.. $ 577.11 



PENSIONS FOR WIDOWS, ORPHANS AND SUPERAN- 
NUATED FIREMEN 

Appropriation $5,132.00 

Am.ount Expended $4,228.66 

Balance unexpended returned to Treasurer.... $ 903,34 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY ON HAND, DECEMBER 31, 1923. 

AND VALUE OF SAME 

1 Motor Triple Combination Pumping- Engine $ 10,500.00 

2 Motor Triple Combination Pumping Engine 25,000.00 

1 Motor Combination Pumping Engine 8,250.00 

1 Motor Combination Chemical and Hose Wagon.... 6,000.00 

2 Steam Fire Engines 10,000.00 

5 Steam Fire Engines 15,000.00 

7 Hose Wagons 2,800.00 

2 Combinations Wagons 2,000.00 

1 Chemical Engine 2,000.00 

1 Aerial Truck and Equipment _ 2,500.00 

1 Truck and Equipment 1,500.00 

1 75 foot Motor Aerial Truck and Equipment 16,000.00 

2 Automobiles 2,500.00 

2 Motorcycles 1,600.00 

13 Horses 2,600.00 

13,700 Feet Serviceable 2^^ inch Hose 10,275.00 

800 Feet Serviceable 11/2 inch Hose. 400.00 

2,150 Feet Chemical Hose 1,075.00 

2 Wagons 400.00 

1 Lungmotor 170.00 

1 Motor Truck 700.00 

Deluge Set, Cellar Pipes, and Monitor Nozzles.... 750.00 
Fire Extinguishers, Life-Nets, Smoke Helmets 

Etc. 1,200.00 

Harness 700.00 

13 Engine Houses, Water Works, Heaters, Etc. 70,000.00 

Drill Equipment and Training Tower 1,000.00 

Fire Alarrn Equipment, Bell Towers, Boxes, Etc. 36,000.00 

Total $230,920.00 



124 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rez 



icw 



AMOUNT DRAWN FROM CITY TREASURER FROM 

JANUARY 1, 1882 TO DECEMBER 31, 1923 

Real Estate received from the city, without charge.... $ 10,000.00 

During the year 1882 $92,000.00 

1883 _ 59.115.23 

1884 51,008.82 

1885 43,319.90 

1886 43,311.43 

1887 44,000.00 

1888 82,000.00 

1889 43,968.16 

1890 47,659.91 

1891 43,845.19 

1892 47,005.53 

1893 48,500.00 

1894 46,500.00 

1895 49,845.25 

1896 44.964.14 

1897 49,939.03 

1898 47.900.00 

1899 48,100.00 

1900 52.500,00 

1901 50,839.20 

1902 57,445.00 

1903 - -.52 600.00 

1904 52,000.00 

1905 54,000.00 

1906 52,000.00 

1907 60,500.00 

1908 _ 59,000.00 

1909 70.075.00 

1910 75,000.00 

1911 74,679.13 

1912 78,258.55 

1913 82,890.34 

1914 80,963.31 

1915 95,136.49 

1916 87,135.00 

1917 87,840.22 

1918 95,616.85 

1919 106,140.34 

1920 - 166,478.70 

1921 149,663.45 

1922 153,556.52 

1923 167,793. 61 $2,995.094.30 

Total Amount $3,005,094.30 

Deduct Property on hand as per Inventory 230.920.00 

Leaves balance of -..-. $2,774,174.30 

Being actual cost of maintaining the department for forty-two years, 
or an expense of $66,054.15 per annum. 

Amount drawn from City Treasurer, 1923 $167,793.61 

Amount paid to City Treasurer, in accordance with City 
Ordinances repuiring proceeds, sale of old Hose, Junk, etc. $93.88 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



125 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF PROPERTY AT RISK 
INSURANCE AND LOSS. 



^S 



^< 



1882 
1883 


34 


72 


1884 


43 


1885 


50 


1886 


57 


1887 


43 


1888 


35 


1889 


52 


1890 


38 


1891 


64 


1892 


66 


1893 


50 


1894 


81 


1895 


80 


1896 


81 


1897 


79 


1898 


121 


1899 


94 


1900 


118 


1901 


151 


1902 


145 


1908 


189 


1904 


183 


1905 


186 


1906 


181 


1907 


204 


1908 


185 


1909 


233 


1910 


275 


1911 


304 


1912 


267 


1913 


207 


1914 


247 


1915 


227 


1916 


221 


1917 


225 


1918 


236 


1919 


279 


1920 


377 


1921 


343 


1922 


305 


1923 


330 1 



Property 

at 

Risk 



293,500.00 

1,229,885.41 

412,163.00 

394,802.14 

431,774.43 

1,191,577.00 

1,256,991.88 

941,975.00 

521,275.00 

1,549,725.00 

380,887.00 

1,306.406.79 

499,942.00 

811,561.12 

387,690.51 

1,271,817.00 

784.111.00 

456,500.00 

371,360.00 

1,025.122.42 

663,020.00 

579,705.00 

994.355.00 

1,502,015.69 

475,hl6.04 

1,028,600.61 

584,823.60 

1,555,788.53 

1,951,837.03 

1,401,949.00 

1,587,075.00 

1,596,524.72 

968.940.00 

786,510.12 

914,146.52 

1,110.075.00 

1,401,231.73 

2,467,477.84 

2,480,040.00 

4,751,003.32 

840,389.00 

1,360.686.00 



$46,510,976.16 



Insurance 



106,205.00 

1,112,-350.00 

305,238.54 

251,100.00 

356,024.43 

1,125.025.00 

1,241,085.00 

898,555.00 

341,850.00 

1,420.350,00 

243.262.00 

1,148,958.49 

267,540.00 

586.321.12 

212,442.61 

803,900.00 

514,975.00 

320,750.00 

213,700.00 

260,426.00 

412,325.00 

293,756.00 

569,400.00 

1,226.250.00 

264,975.00 

671,947.10 

349,432.65 

727,415.00 

1,407,561.00 

1,067,698.83 

1,039,220.00 

1,350,861.00 

700,190.00 

628,510.12 

677,150.00 

748.600.00 

883,827.00 

1,974,131.00 

1,513.400.00 

3,977,944.00 

536,800.00 

902,414.00 



Loss on 

Real 

Estate 



Loss on 
Personal 
Property 



Total Loss 



$ 12,539.09 
50,261.19 
31,665.00 
5„103.80 
46,325.55 
5,081.00 
17,127.00 
17,413.00 
16,431.00 
12.086.50 
42,102.40 
21,336.41 
35,264.20 
14,909.20 
11,318.85 
9,284.00 
14,788.80 
17,749.21 
11,237.70 
33,199.49 
18,998.43 
13,065.75 
11,535.29 
16,744.40 
12,999.78 
26,385.90 
25,760.96 
18,682.17 
84,396.20 
15,026.36 
11,951.63 
64,194.56 
16,647.60 
16,912.15 
23,172.52 
28,633.32 
44,687.35 

116,016.45 
37,011.65 

313,685.02 
57,098.23 
47,947.72 



644,455.79 $1,446,575.86 



$ 20,087.52 

243,699.11 
70,494.98 
22,359.79 
62,216.09 
42,455.17 
86,042.88 
50,47500 
31,125.00 
27,928.17 
20,989.25 

119,084.73 
31,184.50 
16,895.77 
25,001.60 
11,982.83 
17,695.87 
11.826.50 
6,356.17 
33,610.86 
13,381.77 
15,784.60 
35,686.83 
24,426.86 
6,099.73 
50,415.53 
31,413.43 
30,661.79 

188,956.29 
23,111.21 
26,212.50 
23,460.75 
20,393.56 
78,607.00 
12,216.15 
7,368.28 
28,207.75 
54,243.22 
31,874.27 

516,847.75 
56,723.60 
29,632.69 



$ 32,026.61 

293.960.30 

102,159.98 
27,463.59 

10^,541.64 
47,536.17 

103,169.88 
67,888.00 
47,566.00 
40,014.67 
63,091.66 

140.421.14 
66,448.70 
31,804.97 
36,320.45 
21,266.88 
32,484.67 
29,576.71 
17,592.87 
66,810.35 
32,380.20 
28,850.35 
47,222.12 
41,170.26 
18,099.51 
76,801.43 
57,174.39 
49,243.96 

273,351.49 
38,137.57 
38,164.13 
87,655.30 
37,041.16 
95,519.15 
35,388.67 

35,991.60 
72,795.10 

170.258.71 
68.8^5 92 

830,632.77 

113,821.73 
77,580.41 



$2,266,223.36 $3,712,799.21 



Average for 42 Years. 



Property at Risk $1,107,404.19 

Insurance 801.058.47 

Loss on Real Estate $ 34,442.28 

Loss on Personal Property 53,957.70 

Average Loss per Annum $ 88,399.98 



126 Mayor Grace's Animal Review 

KEPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT TO THE BOARD 
OF FIRE MASTERS. 

Charleston, S. C, January 1, 1924. 

To the Chairman and Members of the Board of Firemasters: 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith respectfully submit to your Board my Annual Report 
of the Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 1923, 
and incorpo]-ate in it reports of the lire alarrr^. telegraph lineman, 
surgeon, and trustees firemen's insurance and inspection fund, 
and have made such recommendations as I deem essential to keep 
the Fire Departm.ent abreast of the gTowing needs of our city. 

ALARM, LOSSES AND INSURANCE 

During the Year the Department responded to 330 alarms, 
this being 25 more than in the year 1922. There was 38 false 
alaiTns, and 3 calls for assistance outside of city limits. 

We have used during the year for extinguishing fires 17o 
three gallon extinguishers, 42 chemical tanks, 3,681 feet of ladders, 
and laid 61,000 feet of 21/2 inch hose. 
The most serious fires during the year were: 

January 13, 1923— Box 181 at 2:50 a. m. Nos. 13-15-17 Hayne 
Street, one and four story brick store houses. Loss to building 
and contents ?20,500.00. Insurance on building and contents $62,- 
000.00. Cause unknown. 

March 22, 1923— Box 14 at 1:04 a. m., No. 45 State Street, 
three story brick store and dwelling. Loss to building and contents 
$6,611.19. Insurance on building and contents $11,500.00. Cause 
unknown. 

November 10, 1923.— Box 181 at 1:16 a. m., No. 67-69 State 
Street, tv/o story frame work shop and extended to 51-59-58-60-62 
State Street, 43-45-47-49-51 Market Street and 2-5 Linguard Street. 
Loss to buildings and contents $6,080.00. Insurance on building 
and contents $16,200.00. Cause unknown. 

November 23, 1923— Box 94 at 2:08 p. m. One story brick 
ware house. Loss to building and contents $7,100.00. Insurance on 
building and contents $13,100.00. Cause: Friction. 

The total loss in these fires aggregate $40,291.19, leaving a 
balance of loss on all other fires of only $27,289.22. 

On several occasions during the past year there v/ere at least 
two fires in progress at the same time, the double calls being hand- 
led promptly and efficiently under the system in force. In addi- 
tion to the effoi-t to minimize fire losses, due regard is always 
had in keeping down loss from wat€_, and great care is taken to 
use chemicals and water only in quantities necessary for exting- 
uishing purposes, moreover, tarpaulins are invariably used to pro- 
tect house furnishings and goods when conditions require a fr^e 
use of water. 

The figures for the year 1923 for losses both in insurance and 
valuation of buildings together with contents as nearly as could 
be ascertained are: 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 127 

VALUATION OF PROPERTY AT RISK 

Value of buildings where fire occurred $ 963,950.00 

Value of contents where fire occurred 396,735.00 

Total value of property at risk $1,360,685.00 

INSURANCE AT RISK 

Insurance on buildings $ 668,510.00 

Insurance on contents 233,904.00 

Total insurance involved $ 902,414.00 

'J 

UNINSURED LOSS 

Loss on buildings $ 3,345.00 

Loss on contents 6,160.00 

Total uninsured loss $ 9,505.00 

LOSS INSURED AND UNINSURED 

Loss on buildings $ 47,947.72 

Loss on contents 29,632.69 



Total loss for year $ 77,580.41 

DEPARTMENT BUILDINGS 

Minor repairs, and improvements were made to each of the 
several stations at a total cost of $1,292.69, the firemen being, 
wherever possible, employed in making such repairs. 

We have men who can do most any kind of work around the 
houses, and at any time that repairs are necessary, seldom we 
have to go out of the department to have it done. The work 
these men accomplish has saved the Department many thousands 
of dollars. 

With the exception of the truck house in John Street, the 
Department buildings are in good condition. 

APPARATUS; AND EQUIPMENT 

The annual inspection of apparatus and equipment, including 
hose, was made and the necessary repairs made to bring same 
up to the p<roper standard of efficiency, but owing to long service 
the steam engines are liable to give out at any time, and should 
be replaced with new and up-to-date motor engines. 

MOTOR DRIVEN APPARATUS 

On,e seagrave triple combination pumper, 1,000 gallon cap- 
acity. 

Two American La-Prance triple combination pumpers, 750 gal- 
lon capacity. 

One Webb combination Hose Wage and pumper, 700 gallon 
capacity. 



128 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

One Seagrave combination hose wagon and chemical engine, 
towing second size Silsby engine. 

Two Indian Fire Apparatus, for Still Alarms. 

One 75 foot American La France aerial ladder tinick. 

Two Chief's cars; one Dodge and one Ford. 

HORSE DRAWN APPARATUS 

One second size Metropolitan engine. 

One third size Silsby engine. 

Two combination hose wagon and chemical engines. 

One fuel wagon. 

MARINE DIVISION 

In this division, without cost except when actually ac work, are 
the tug boat Hinton, V/arban and Cecilia, equipped with pumps of 
large capacity and fitted with hose, nozzels, etc. These boats 
have already demonstrated their value and have been the means 
of saving much property not only wharf property is protected, 
but hose is held in reserve that their use may be extended to the 
cotton warehouses and the East Bay wholesale district. 

RESERVE APPARATUS 

Four steam fire engines are in reserve; also one chemical 
engine with two 80 gallon tanks; four hose wagons; one fuel 
wagon; one city truck; and one 65 foot aerial truck; all are kept 
in readiness for instant service. 

HEATERS. 

All heaters used by the Department are in good order. 

HORSES. 

There are thirteen horses in the department. Nine of these 
horses are in active service, and two used as extras, Tw^o of the 
horses will be sold, or given in exchange as part payment for one 
new horse as some horses in service are failing and should be 
replaced by younger ones. 

HARNESS 

All harness used by the Department is in good condition. 

HOSE 

There is on hand 13,700 feet of 2^^ inch rubber lined double 
jacket cotton fire hose; 800 feet 1^/^ inch rubber lined cotton fire 
hose and 2,150 feet of chemical hose; all of w^hich seems to be in 
excellent condition. 

All of the 2^^ inch hose is tested annually under 150 to 175 
pounds hydrastatic pressure and these sections that indicate a 
weakness are condemned and sold, and the proceeds from such sale 
are paid over to the City Treasurer. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 129 

During the year 1,250 feet of 2l^ inch hose was condemned, 
some having been in service about seven j^ears. 

With the new hose that will be purchased this year the supply 
should prove ample. 

SCHOOL OF INSTRUCTION. 

Under the efficient direction of the instructor, Second Assitant 
Chief G. H. Benedikt and Capt P. Verde, of Engine Company No. 
2 school work was continued according to the usual program, with 
individual work from June to September. 

The men were instructed in the use of all tools and appliances, 
and the purpose and use of ^each one explained to them. The use 
of life nets, care and use of pipes, couplings, fittings, etc. tying 
regulation knots under various conditions, raising and lowering 
ladders, hoisting ladders to roof, using rope and hose hoists, carry- 
ing ladders vertically from one position to another, the use of 
smoke helmets and all other tools in the Department being sub- 
jects of instruction. 

Each company is also required to maintain weekly drill in 
the use of the apparatus, tools, and appurtenances of the Depari> 
ment. These drills are held under the supervision of the captains 
and lieutenants of the companies. 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

This branch of the service in fair condition. During the year 
much work has been done in this department in placing wires, new 
poles, crossarms, extendng the lines and adding five fire alarm 
boxes to the system. 

Part of the underground system has been placed overhead, and 
during 1924 balance of underground will be placed overhead. 

SERVICE IMPROVEMENTS 

The service improvements for the past year may be summed 
up as follows: — 

One 75 Foot American- LaFrance Motor Aerial Ladder Truck. 

Two Indian Motor Fire Apparatus; For Still Alarais. 

Twenty-five hundred feet 2^/^ inch rubber lined cotton fire hose. 

Three hundred feet 1^/^ inch rubber lined cotton fire hose. 

Five fire alarm boxes. 

New front rubber tires Engine No. 2. 

New rear rubber tires Engine No. 3. 

New suction to Engine No. 3. 

New suction to Engine No. 6. 

WATER MAINS. 

The water service for the protection of the city has been 
improved. The* report from the water department for vhe year 
1923, shows the water supply increased by the laying of more than 
two miles of six inch, and larger mains, the replacing of 48 old 
style hydrants with improved hydrants, and the addition of ten 
improved hydrants ,also 58 valves in the distribution system, there- 
by restricting the territory closed down in case of accident, all 
contributed materially to a much better water supply service. 



130 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

FIRE PREVENTION AND PROTECTION OF PUBLIC AND 
SEMI-PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

^ A systematic inspection of buildings, with regards to business 
interest and the examination of premises, is an important feature 
m the daily routine of the Department. The idea is not only to 
seek out and correct conditions that contribute to the fire hazard, 
but to familiarize the men with the interior of buildings, giving 
them that knowledge that is most helpful to them in handling 
fires that might occur therein. 

^During the year the monthly inspection of buildings totaled 
10,521 and the annual inspection which included all buildings within 
the limits of the city, covered 14,386 places, a total of 24,907 
buildings inspected. 

Headquarters, officials and men of the Department have investi- 
gated 339 complaints from different sources. Inflamable rubbish, 
stove pipes and defective chimneys constituted the majority of 
these complaints; mostly coming from dwelling houses of which 
only one inspection is made during the year. 

As a part of fire prevention Vv^ork, all fires have been carefully 
investigated to determine their cause and origin. 

The inspections are of great benefit to the citizens and property- 
owners in general and I respectfully ask their further cooperation 
in this important work. 

These inspections are also of great value to the Department, 
allowing the members to familiarize themselves as to the nature 
of contents and construction of different buildings within their 
district. 

During the year there has been in attendance at all p,erform- 
ances at the Academy of Music, Victory Theatre, and other places 
of amusement, as required by the city ordinances, a detail of firen 
men, whose duty it is to see that no chairs are placed in the aisles 
or passage way, to prevent smoking in any part of the house, 
excepting on the stage by actors for scenic effect; to keep all 
exits free from obstruction and to generally safeguard the public. 
Inspections are frequently made of the moving picture houses 
in the city lo make certain that the booths and picture machines 
comply with the Ordinances. In fact, very possible precaution has 
been taken to guard the safety of citizens against fire danger at 
places of public amusement. 

I am pleased to state that the management of all theaters 
and moving picture screens and illustrated use and method of send- 
ing in alarms from the fire alarm boxes. 

The cooperation of the public generally, through a widespread 
educational campaign emphasizing the danger from fire, is be- 
coming more and more apparent, and I am glad to report that 
not in a single ease was it necessary to resort to the courts in 
order to secure the removal of inflammable or combustible material. 

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK. 

During the week ending October 13th, 1923, in addition to the 
usual inspection by company officers, a member from several compa- 
nies also made an intensive drive through the ''High Value District" 
for the purpose of causing the removal of combusible rubbish 
articles blocking egress, and other simple but hazardous conditione 
tending to create a fire menace. 



Mayor Grace's Anmial Review 131 

Lectures on fire, prevention were delivered by an officer of the 
department in the Public Schools, also fire drills witnessed in the 
various public schools throughout the city. 

The Department during the week utilized one of the depart- 
ment's hose wagon, displaying floats showing the various causes 
of preventable fires, and giving practical demonstration of the 
proper way to send in a fire alarm. 

DISCIPLINE. 

It is gratifying to state that the efficiency and discipline of 
the Department are first class, the officers and members being 
ever ready to perform their duties and obey orders, whatever 
measure of credit this Department may be entitled to is due to 
the faithful and intelligent cooperation which has always been 
cheerfully rendered by the men under me. Such transfer orders 
as were issued from company to company were made for the 
purpose of increasing the general efficiency of the organization. 

KETIPvEMENTS. 

T. W. Halsall, Engine Co. No. 3. Appointed Assistant Engi- 
neer, March 15, 1882. Appointed as Engineer, October 7, 1885. 
Retired on accounlt of length of service and physical disability, 
April 1, 1923. 

H. C. Ford, Truck Co. No. 1. Appointed, August 3, 1890. 
Driver, appointed Ladderman, March 16, 1911, appointed Lieuten- 
ant, February 16, 1917. Retired on account of length of serviqe 
and physical disability, December 31, 1923. 

CASUALTIES TO FIREMEN ON DUTY. 

Casualties to firemen, none of which proved fatal, were un- 
usually heavy among members of the Department during the past 
year, due chiefly to injuries incurred by Motor Engine No. 6 over- 
turning responding to fire Burton Lumber Mills outside city limits 

March 7 — Following is a list of members of Engine No. 6, 
injured and the nature of their injuries: 

March 7 — Lieutenant R. Mansfield bruised head and shoulders. 
Off duty six days. 

March 7 — Engineer J. E. Due, bruised leg. Off duty five days. 

March 7 — Fireman J. H. Graham, bruised leg, shoulder, and 
arm. Off duty six days. 

March 7 — Fireman C. C. Barrinneau, bruised left arm. Off 
duty two aays. 

March 7 — Fireman J. W. Hendricks, broken left ankle. Off 
duty eight months. 

March 29 — Fireman A. C. Grooms, Company No. 7, broken 
leg, still under care of Department surgeon. 

August 27 — Lieutenant H. Rosofsky, Motor Engine No. 3, over- 
come by siewer gas. Off duty seven weeks. 

CASUALTIES TO CITIZENS. 

July 25, 1923, Telephone alarm fire — Mrs. Walburger Elder, 
received bums on face, arms, chest. Passed away July 25, 1923. 
Cause, trying to light a charcoal iron with kerosene oil. 



132 Mayor Grace's Anniuil Reviczi' 

GENERAL REMARKS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I am only recommending what I regard as essential, for I 
realize that it may not be practical to acquire at once everything 
that we need to make our department fully adequate to protect 
our city. 

1st, I would respectfully urge a m.otorizatlon of the entire 
department, as it would greatly add to its effectiveness and econ- 
omy. The experimental stage of the motor fire engine has been 
passed, and the machine of today is depmdable in eve^y particular. 

I would recommend that $13,000 be appropriated each year, 
to replace our two horse-drawn steam fire engines with motor 
engines, and I am prepared to show from our records that in five 
years the expenses would be saved in maintenance cost, and there 
after the purchase would continue to add to the economy of the 
administration of the department. 

The first motor engine placed in our service more than thirteen 
years ago, today pumps to its rated capacity, and in comparison 
with the expense of the horse-drawn appara'uus, has several times 
paid for its cost. 

The displaced steam fire engines are kept in prime condition, 
in reserve, ready at a moment's notice to respond to any call that 
might over-tax our regular force, for which emergency we keep 
constantly prepared, watchful and expectant. 

2nd, to keep up with the growth of the city, I would recommend 
the establishment of hydrants at the following locations: 

One on Pritchard near Concord Street. 
One at Concord and Pinckney Streets. 
One on Church opposite Linguard Street. 
One at.N. E. Corner State and Broad Streets. 

(Above four hydrants to have AV-z inch openings.) 

One at N. E. Corner Boulevard and Council Streets. 

One on Boulevard, 200 feet west of Hotel Sumter. 

One at S. W. Comer Sheppard and Ashe Streeits. 

One at S. W. Comer Sheppard and Coming Streets. . 

One at N. E. Corner Fifth Ave and Grove Street. 

One at N. W. Comer Peach and Darlington Streets. 

One on South side of Columbus St., west side of Railroad Track. 

One on North side of Reid Street, west side of Railroad Track. 

3rd. The appeal for assistance to extinguish fires ouside of 
the city limits causes us expense and much concern, and I would 
recommend that an ordinance be passed, fixing a charge for such 
service, simlar to charges in effect in other cities. We could detail 
a reserve engine to respond to such calls, and thus not unduly 
impair our regular force. 

4th. While I am appreciative of, and full recognize the value 
of assistance often rendered by the public at fires, yet the crowding 
of apparatus by automobiles on their way to fires, is a constant 
hindrance and menace, and I would ask that an ordinance be passed 
that would prohibit automobiles from following the fire appartus 
at a distance of less than 500 feet, and from parking near the 
fire grounds. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 133 

I would recommend that all public schools, theatres, hospitals 
and hotels be required to install, at their expense, standard fire 
alarm boxes, to be thereafter maintained and tested by the depart- 
ment, and that all fire alarm boxes be indicated at night by a red 
light, visibly far away. 

At no distance time a fire station in the north-western part 
of the city should be established to protect that growing area; but 
as economy, as well as efficiency, is our aims, we will do the best 
we can for the present with our existing equipment, 

CONCLUSION. 

In concluding my annual report, I acknowledge with grateful 
appreciation the valuable assistance the Chairman and Members of 
the Board rendered me at all times. Your hearty cooperation has 
been a sustaining influence while the many suggestions which you 
have made have enabled me to improve the character of my work. 

To all the officers and members of the Department under my 
charge, I tender my sincere thanks for their loyal support, and for 
the efficient manner in which they have performed their public 
serivce and for th,e courage and efficiency they have displayed in 
their calling. 

The Chief of Police and various other department heads, have 
at all times been eager to render such aid as was in their power 
for which I am deeply indebted. 

To the foremen and linesmen of the Consolidated Company 
I wish to acknowledge my thanks for their promptness in responding 
to alarms and in giving us ail desired assistance. 

To Mr. James E. Gibson, manager and engineer, and to Mr. 
Comfort Bennett, superintendent of distribution and mains, of the 
City Water Works, for their watchful care of hydrants, kept always 
in readiness for use, I wish to expres appreciation. 

To the citizens and to the local representatives of the Insurance 
Companies, I wish to extend my thanks for the information received 
relative to the amount of insurance paid on losses at fires; also to 
the members of other departments who have been in touch with 
ths department, and to the representatives of the press for their 
fair and impartial reports of the Fire Department work. 

Finally I desire to state that I have scanned carefully fire 
department reports from many of the cities in the United States. 
I have listened with a great deal of care and attention to debates 
in the Conventions of the International Association of Fire Chiefs, 
as to the progress which other cities are making in fire department 
work and from results accomplished, by our own fire departmenl, I 
can say without fear of contradiction, that the department of the 
City of Charleston today is equal to that of any city of like size in 
this country and one of which our citizenship may well feel proud. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS BEHRENS, 

Chief Fire Department. 



134 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 





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Mayor Grace's Annual Review 135 

REPORT OF LINEMAN OF FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1924. 
To the Chairman and Board of Fire Masters. 
Gentlemen : 

I beg leave to tender my report for the past year as follows: 

The Fire Alarm have been working fairly well, and considerable 
new work has been done during the past year. 

All troubles and calls from other companies have been at- 
tended to promptly. 

The following new Boxes have been installed: — 
25 — South Bay and Rutledge Avenue, 
233— Church and Atlantic Streets, 
422 — ^"Gadsden and Bennett Streets, 
817 — President and Fishbume Streets, 
844— Ashley Park, 

10 Boxes have been installed in the various public schools, 
and 1 Box at the theatre as follows: — 
35 — Craft School, Queen and Legare Streets, 
37 — Memminger School, Beaufain and St. Philip Streets, 
54 — Shaw School, Mary and America Streets, 
56 — Buist School, Calhoun, east of Meeting Streets, 
64 — High School, Rutledge Avenue, opp. Vanderhorst Street. 
432 — Bennett School, St. Philip and George Street, 
622 — Simonton School, Morris and Jasper Streets, 
816 — Burke Industrial School, President and Fishburne Streets, 
852 — Mitchell School, Perry and Sheppard Streets, 
46 — Victory Theatre, Society Street. 

SIGNALS: 

Fire Alarms 140 

Noon Signals 312 

Test Alarms 120 

NUMBER OF INSTRUMENTS ON EACH CIRCUIT: 

Circuit 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Totals 

Boxes 21 25 19 17 26 19 17 17 161 

Gongs 5542-. 112 20 

Indicators 3 1 1 1 .... 1 7 

Bells 2.1 -. -. 3 

Total 191 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. BROWN, 

Lineman, Fire Alarm Telegraph. 



136 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

REPORT OF SURGEON. 

Charleston, S. C, January 1, 1924. 
To the Chairman and Board of Firemasters. 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit the following report of work done in 
the Department for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1923. 
J. W. Hendricks — Fracture of right leg. 
C. C. Barrineau — Contusion of head. 
J. A. Graham — Contusion of back. 
J. E. Dues — Contusion of left leg. 
A. C. Grooms — Fracture of left femur. 
H. Brown — vSprain of right thumb. 
T. G. Mclndoe— Shingles. 
A. Posofsky — Overcome by gas. 

Fifteen or twenty men examined for the Department. 
Total number of hospital, house and office vsits, 305. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD RUTLEDGE, M. D., 

Surgeon in Charge. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS, BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE FIREMEN'S INSURANCE AND INSPECTION 

FUND, JANUARY 1, 1923, TO DECEMBER 31, 1923. 

Receipts 

Balance from last annual statement: 

Pension Fund $58,714.24 

Disabled and Superannuated Fund 500.00 

$59,214.24 

Fines per Pay Rolls 86.00 

Interest on Deposits 3,073.49 

3,159.49 

Pension Fund : 

Premiums from Fire Insurance Company 4,227.71 

Broker's fee from Comptroller General 1.80 

1 Per Cent Assessment from Pav Roll _ 1,357.11 

5,586.62 

Donations „ 430.00 

$68,390.35 



Expenditures 

Pension Fund : 

Pension to A. Myers 973.56 

Pension to T. W. Halsall _ 519.75 

Premium City Treasurer's Bond , 125.00 

Printing Bv-Laws 20.00 

5% on $4,227.71 to State Firemen's Association 211.38 



1,849.69 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 137 

Disabled and Superannuated Fund : 

Funeral expense T. E. Watson 100.00 

Funeral expense B. E. Bicaise 100.00 

200.00 

Balance - - 66,340.66 

68,390.35 
Funds have to credit December 31, 1923 : 

Pension Fund 65,410.66 

Disabled and Superannuated Fund 500.00 

Donation Fund 430.00 

$66,340.66 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. S. SMITH, 

Treasurer. 
Examned and found correct: 
John H. Steenken, 
Louis Behrens, 
Committee. 

REPORT OF MARKET COMMISSIONERS 

Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1924 

To The Commissioners of Public Market, 
Charleston, S. C. 

Dear Sirs : 

I hereby submit my Annual Report, in reference to ex- 
penditures, etc., that have been incurred in this office during 
the year 1923 ; with itemeized statement attached. 

To Budget for Year 1923 $6,447.36 

To Budget for Repairs, 1923 800.00 

Total $7,247.36 

Paid Expenses and Repairs 6,718.81 

Balance (Returned to City Treasurer) $ 528.55 

FRANK F. SCARPA, 

Clerk. 
Examined and found correct, 
VINCENT CHICCO, 

Chairman Board of Market Com. 



138 Mayor Grace's Annual Rczncw 

BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS 



December 31, 1923 

To the Honorable the Mayor 
and City Council. 

Gentlemen : 

The Board of Park Commissioners respectfully presents 
to you, and through you to the people of the City, its 28th 
Annual Report for the year ending December 31st, 1923. 
The Condensed Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 
is hereunto annexed and all vouchers are on file in the office 
of the City Treasurer. Report of the Park Supervisor ac- 
companies this Report showing in detail the work done 
in the Department of Parks. 

Roadway Around Hampton Park — This is again brought 
to the attention of City Council, as in previous years, and 
so far without success as to an appropriation therefor. The 
present dirt roadway is entirely out of keeping with an 
ideal City Park, a continuous item of expense, and subjects 
the Board to much undeserved criticism, they being with- 
out funds for an Asphalt Roadway, until, City Council 
makes an appropriation therefor. Until an appropriation 
is made for this purpose the present roadway will continue 
to be a detriment to Hampton Park. This roadway when 
built should be properly lighted. 

Tennis Courts — The present Tennis Courts are in such 
demand that reservations are made a month in advance if 
use of the same is desired. Urgent requests are daily being 
made by players for additional courts, but no request for 
an appropriation will be made in the estimate of require- 
ments for 1924, as understood matters of this class would be 
determined by a Board of Experts as to the granting of 
same. 

Base Ball Grounds — At the entrance to Hampton Park, 
on the South, and the former College grounds on the North, 
having been placed by the City Council, in the first instance 
to a Special Committee, and in the second instance, to the 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 139 

Play Grounds Commission, the attention of City Cuncil is 
called to these two grounds which are located on the ap- 
proaches to Hampton Park, as to placing them in proper 
condition, so as to make attractive the approaches to Hamp- 
ton Park at Cleveland Street, as now the City is responsible 
for their appearance and not the lessees. 

Music — Few Free Band Concerts were given the past 
year, as only a limited appropriation was made therefor, 
and the increased price for bands per concert. 

Horticulture — It is the aim of the Board to make inter- 
esting and attractive floral displays in the parks, especially 
at Hampton Park, where a Green House has been estab- 
lished. 

Comfort Stations — The Board feels that when the City 
can afford the outlay and maintenance. Comfort Stations 
should be established and an appropriation will be asked for 
this purpose at Plampton Park. 

Police — The Park Police Force consists of only three 
men and its purpose is primarily to protect children in the 
Park. Its work is also to prevent the commission of any 
offense. The Police are instructed to watch diligently for 
a certain class of offenders, and the hours of the parking of 
automobiles is under consideration. The regular city police 
force co-operates in every way with the Park Police Force. 

Damage to Parks, etc. — A lack of respect for public prop- 
erty by some of the visitors to the Parks and of youths and 
children for the palmettos planted on the streets, causes con- 
siderable damage. The destruction of trees, palmettos, 
shrubs and plants in late years (and this year has been no 
exception) is an added, and, it would seem an unnecessary 
expense to the city. 

It is suggested that the Public Schools devote a few min- 
utes each week to teach children a v^^holesome respect for 
property rights^ for '*as the twig is bent the tree inclines" 
and principles instilled in the minds of youth, become more 
or less permanent. 

Appropriations — The Board is of the opinion that in 
view of the increasing use of the Parks, if they are to be 



140 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

properly maintained and improved a recjuisite appropriation 
must be made available tberefor. 

Donations — Were received from and the thanks of the 
Board extended to : 

William M. Bird & Co., Inc., for flag for the Band Stand. 

Dr. J. C. Wieters for back stops for the Tennis Courts. 

With the continued co-operation of the Mayor and City 
Council the Board feels it can look forward td having Parks 
that will be ornaments to the city and Parks that all citi- 
zens can point to with pride. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

SAMUEL LAPHAM, 

Chairman, Board of Park Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF PARKS 



To the Honorable Board of Park Commissioners, 
Gentlemen : 

Please accept my annual report herewith which com- 
pletely covers the activities of the Forestry and Park Depart- 
ments for the Calendar year Nineteen Hundred and Twen- 
ty-three. 

Hampton Park — The Band Stand which was badly in 
need of attention, v/as put in first class repair, the work con- 
sisting of new concrete founation, Pillars and new string- 
ers, al old and decayed wood benig replaced with new ma- 
terial. 

A new tin roof was put on the dome of the Stand, to- 
gether with new flag pole, and the entire Stand was painted, 
inside and out, the regular Park Department colors of 
white and green being used. 

Looking from the band stand southward, stands the new 
concrete bridge, this bridge is ten feet longer than the two 
bridges built last year and carries lights to conform with the 
other bridges. The completion of this last bridge marks 
the opening of the three entrances to the Sunken Gardens. 

The next important step w^as the concrete walk around 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 141 

the fountain between the east and west bridges, this walk 
has a twofold purpose, it does away with the lowest part 
of the Sunken Garden and connects the east and west bridges 
giving the center of the Garden the finished appearance 
which it lacked before. 

An eighteen inch wire fence was built completely around 
the Sunken Garden, the object of this fence being to keep 
the ducks out of the Sunken Garden. 

The flower beds in the Sunken Garden were kept filled 
with a show of flowering plants throughout the year. The 
fountain in the center of the Sunken Garden was covered 
with an undercoating of red lead and painted. 

The bungalow at the picnic grounds was in a very poor 
condition and it was necessary to paint the ceiling, side walls 
and stain the floor of the interior. The toilets were re- 
paired, new tin put on the roof and the outside of the 
building was painted, all evergreen trees removed from 
around the base of the building and lattice work built in 
between the brick pillars at the foundation. 

Eight new swings were erected at the picnic ground, new 
chains and swingboards being included. Proper attention 
was given the grounds and the trees looked after and dead 
wood removed where necessary. 

Nine hundred feet of wire fence was erected on the south 
side of the Park on the edge of the shrubbery border, the 
purpose of this fence is to prevent the public from cutting 
across flower beds at this point. The roses were fertilized 
and pruned back, climbing roses were treated in like manner, 
all walks kept in clean and orderly condition and the grass 
sections trimmed at regular intervals during the year. 

A number of young rabbits were raised at the Park and 
also one hundred and seven ducks. Several thousand plants 
were raised in the green house for Park planting. The pri- 
vet hedge was given special attention and kept in splendid 
order. This was the greatest year ever experienced in the 
tennis courts. The courts were constantly in use, and at 
present there are many people who wish to play tennis and 
unable to get a booking. 

The small cottage was painted and the roof repaired. 



142 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Two months were consumed in pruning, thinning out and 
removing all dead wood from the Oak trees on each side 
of the road around Hampton Park. This work will greatly 
improve the condition of the trees and add much to their 
appearance. 

UPPER WARDS 

Hampstead Mall — Every effort was made to keep this 
Park in order as this Park is one of the most trying pro- 
blems of our Park system, the spirit of destruction seems to 
prevail in this Park at all times. However, all care was 
exercised in keeping the hedge trimmed and straightened up, 
the lawn was kept cut and in first class appearance through- 
out the entire season. The paths v/ere properly edged and 
kept in order. Five diseased trees were cut down and the 
balance of trees trimm^ed and dead wood removed. 

Wragg Square — The Park was looked after throughout 
the season. The lawn was fertilized and the grass cut and 
raked regularly. The paths were edged and kept clean, 
all trees pruned and dead wood removed. The fence was 
repaired where it was in need and the privet hedge cut and 
kept in order. The fountain was scraped and repainted. 

Allen Park — With much regret I must report that the 
venture in improving Allen Park has fallen short of expec- 
tations. The Fountain suffered severely, at the hands it 
is presumed of the children of the neighborhood, the water 
jets being twisted off and destroyed. This will necessitate 
filling the basin in with soil. Two concrete benches were 
placed in this Park, the balance of the benches there repair- 
ed. Twelve Palmetto trees were planted, the grass was cut 
and the grounds kept up. 

LOWER WARDS 

Battery — Strict observance was given to White Point 
Gardens throughout the year, especially the palms, trees 
and evergreens, that were planted last year. The walks 
were kept in first class condition and likewise the lawns. 
The purchase of a horse mower, proved to be of great 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 143 

advantage over the hand mowers used heretofore. Fifty 
new concrete benches were placed on the battery and all 
of the old broken benches and the damaged ones were 
removed. Those worth saving were put in first class con- 
dition. A number of diseased trees were removed and dead 
wood cut out of the live oak trees. 

Washington Park — A considerable improvement was 
made in the Park by planting a number of Washington 
Robusta Palms in the open spaces of the lawns with a brick 
ground of Abelis Grandiflora. The latter being used to 
screen the brick wall which is the boundary line between 
the Confederate College and Washington Park. Bluegreens 
were planted about the base of the monument in the center 
of the Park. The lawns were fertilized, mowed and kept 
in first class condition through the entire year. The old 
diseased trees were removed and the balance of the trees 
properly trimmed. 

New concrete benches were placed at the entrances to 
the Park on Meeting and Broad Streets. All old benches 
were repaired and painted. The nut grass gave an unusual 
amount of trouble during the year and is a source of con- 
siderable expense to keep down. The grass grows between 
the bricks and has to be cut out with a knife, which is a very 
tedious and costly process. 

Cannon Park — The lawn around the Museum was kept 
in good order. The horse mowing machine from the Bat- 
tery used for this purpose. All walks shaped up and kept 
clean. Twenty palmettos were planted around the grounds 
of the Park and carefully looked after, the old palmettos 
properly trimmed up and the privet hedge at the entrance of 
the Museum was pruned back and kept in order through 
the growing season. Benches were repaired where it was 
found necessary. 

SHADE TREE DEPARTMENT 

All dead laurel oaks were replaced by the Glen Saint 
Mary Nursery Company, as set forth in their contract. All 
new trees were fertilized, cultivated and watered, tree pro- 



144 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

lectors were placed on all new trees set out. One hundred 
and thirty-one dead trees were cut down throughout the 
city and all brush wood removed by the carts from Hamp- 
ton Park. Three hundred and thirteen shade trees were 
trimmed in various parts of the city, this work is on the 
increase and requires our best attention throughout the 
year. 

RECOMMENDATIONS* 

I would recommend that a new asphalt road be built 
around Hampton Park. The need of a good road in this 
Park has been most urgent for many years, and now that 
the new^ hotel will bring a great number of tourists to the 
city, it becomes necessary that steps in that direction be 
taken at once. The present road is a discredit to the Board 
and a reflection on the City. The Park is also greatly in 
need of a lighting system, as at present there are no lights 
on the roadway around the park. 

I would also suggest that two lights be placed in Wash- 
ington Park as the illumination in this Park at present is 
inadequte. 

I wish to express my heartfelt thanks to the Board of 
Park Commissioners for their loyal support and co-opera- 
tion, also to my employees who so faithfully performed their 
numerous duties through a most trying year. 

\VM. M. JENNINGS, 

Supervisor of Parks. 



COUSOLIDATED STATEMENT RECEIPTS AND DISBPRSE- 

MEXTS, 1923. 
HENRY VON GLAHN, Secretary 



ADMINISTRATION 

Super\-isor's Salary $ 2,400.00 

Secretar>-'s Salary- „ 300.00 

Police - _„ - 3,432.14 

Printing and Stationery „ 102.50 

Telephones „ „ _ _ 67.39 

Advertising „ „ _ 12.90 

Insurance „ _ 134. 14 

Incidentals „ _ 82.76 

Music 227.50 

$ 6,759.33 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



145 



CARE 



Pay Rolls 

Transportation, Car Tickets 



MAINTENANCE 



Materials and Supplies 

Forage and Feed 

Fuel, Green House 

Allen Park 

Shoeing 

Auto Tires — 

Auto Repairs 

Texas Co _ - 



$16,490.15 
50.00 



$ 4,568.32 

554.80 

228.53 

34.77 

27.00 

135.00 

92.80 

28.13 



16.540.15 



5.669.35 



UGHTING 

Electric Lighting — 3 years. Transferred without 
notice by City Electrician from the usual 
account — Lighting the City 



$ 691.80 



Exchange of Mules 
Air Dome Removal 



Spraying Machine 
Automobile ~- 



Pa- Roll 
Freight 



Replacements 
Tree Guards 



REPLACEMENTS 



EQUIPMENT 



SHADE TREES 



$ 400.00 
75.00 



$ 1,406.75 
1,050.00 



$ 2,206.72 
262.99 
100.00 
720.00 



691.80 



475.00 



2,456.75 



3.289.71 



IMPROVEMENTS 



Band Stand, etc. .._ 

Bridges, etc 



920.00 

2,022.75 



SHRUBS AND PLANTS 
Seeds, Roses, etc _ $ 745.90 



2.942.75 



Total Expenditures per books of City Treasurer ., 
Unexpended to General Income Account City. 

Appropriations ^ .^ „ 



745.90 

- $39,570.74 

679.26 

- $40,250.00 



146 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

MUNICIPAL PLAYGROUND COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen 
of the City of Charleston, S. C. 

In making this report for 1923, I shall leave most of the 
detail work to our Supevisor, Miss Corrine Jones. She can 
cover the ground more fully than I can. Altho reduced 
in members, we have held regular meetings, all through the 
summer, with only two exceptions, one being due to the lack 
of a quorum, the other on account of the absence of several 
members and myself from the City. The four playgrounds, 
three white, one colored are all in good running order, but 
sadly in need of new equipment. Repairs are made and the 
apparatus kept in good condition and safe for the children. 

Our staff is well organized, consisting of a Supervisor, 
with two directors, one for girls and one for boys, on each 
playground. During the summer months, a director of 
athletics is needed. During the winter all playgrounds 
are open every afternoon, and on Saturdays, during the 
summer, in accordance with the opening and closing of the 
schools, morning and afternoon schedules are maintained. 
Through the courtesy of the Y. M. C. A. boys have the 
privilege of the swimming pool and the girls go to the 
Y. W. C. A. Many have learned to swim, and this brings 
me to a subject that I feel awfully disappointed about, and 
that is, that another year has passed and we, as yet, have 
no Municipal Swimming Pool. It is a crying need. A 
shame that Charleston can not give to the young people a 
place that would do so much for their well being. Another 
thing we need is an Athletic Field, one under the Play- 
ground commission for Junior Athletics, it belongs with the 
recreational facilities so necessary for growing youth. Play 
and a place to play are the breath and life of our people. 
Owing to the congested condition of the colored Play- 
ground, permission was obtained from City Council to 
move the apparatus to the corner of Line and President Sts., 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 147 

this has been of great benefit, the large space making it bet- 
ter for the huge numbers that gather there. It is hoped 
that some day that whole square will be given over for this 
playground allowing for its growth and expansion. A 
group of colored people headed by Dr. Huldah Prioleau, 
has offered to the Playground Commission, the old African 
Burying Ground on Hanover, to be used as a Playground. 
This was referred to City Council, who in turn referred it 
to the Committee on Pleasure Grounds. Without permis- 
sion from City Council we can not accept it. The Police 
Department has fully co-operated and their assistance is 
sometimes needed. 

I wish to thank the Members of the Commission for their 
efforts and advice, I fully appreciate their co-operation. It 
is pleasing to note the opening of another playground in 
Charleston, St. Phillips, in a district where one is very 
necessary. I wish it were possible to have one in every 
available space to keep the children out of the streets. 

It was with real regret that I declined Governor McLeod's 
appointment to represent the State of South Carolina at the 
10th- Recreational Congress held in Springfield, 111. Oct. 
8th, 1923. This honor came to your Chairman as a real 
compliment to the Charleston Municipal Playground Com- 
mission. 

"The child is our real wealth, its care our highest Duty." 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH KLINCK TIEDEMAN. 

(Mrs. John C.) 

Chairman Municipal Playground Commission 



148 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rev 



lew 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR. 

Mrs. John. C. Ticdeman, Chairman, 

Municipal Playground Commission, 

My dear Mrs. Tiedeman : — 

I herewith submit to you the report of the work done on 
the Municipal Playgrounds during the y^ar ending Dec- 
ember 31, 1923. 

The work of the Playgrounds has shown a healthy growth 
during the past year. The number and variety of the many 
activities, embraced in our playground work, are both phy- 
sical and social, besides having a most decided moral up- 
lift among those frequenting the different centers. The 
number of attendants has been increased. The records 
show an increase of fifteen thousand, eight hundred and 
thirty-three (15,833) over last year; and one-hundred and 
seventy-five thousand, four hundred and ten ( 175,410) over 
the year nineteen eighteen (1918). 

Aggregate Attendance. 

Number Total Total Total Ave. 

Playground of days boys girls daily 

open atten. 

Mitchell 293 41,619 28,568 70,187 247 

Marion 293 56,361 40,800 97,161 332 

Mall 293 30,832 22,214 53,046 181 

Colored 244 15,289 7,958 23,247 95 

Grand Totals 144,101 99,540 243,641 855 

NOTE — Marion has the larger attendance, because of it's 
central location and the fact that most of the base- 
ball games were played there this Summer. Mall 
has a smaller attendance but more regular one, the 
boys and girls using this ground are always there as 
soon as we open up. The Colored playground was 
closed for two months and of course that cut down 
the attendance records. The reason will be explain- 
ed further on. 



k 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 149 

It is a source of great satisfaction to note the increas- 
ing interest of the citizens at large in the recreation move- 
ment as a whole and in the playgrounds in particular. \¥c 
would appreciate it if every organization in the City would 
send a representative to visit each playground at least once 
a year I We need the interest and cooperation of every 
individual to make the playgrounds the gi*eat success wc 
desire. 

It is necessary every year, particularly where the appara- 
tus and equipment has been standing for several years, to do 
much repair work. This is due to the constant use and to 
the exposure to all kinds of weather. Each piece of appara- 
tus is closely watched, in order that it might always be safe 
for the children to use. A new fence replaced the tumbl- 
ing one at Mitchell on the Rutledge Avenue side. Concrete 
posts were used this time, making this repair work more 
permanent. AH of the shelter houses and the parts of the 
apparatus, requiring it, have had at least two coats of 
paint. The flooring at the Mall was replaced. All of the 
needed repairs on the apparatus were made. All of the 
basket-ball back-boards had to be made over. Two tennis- 
courts were made at Marion. The necessary equipment v/as 
looked after and replaced when needed. The largest job wc 
had to accomplish, in the way of repairs and installation, 
was the moving of the Colored Playground from the Color 
ed Industrial School yard to a piece of land on the corner of 
Line and President Streets, this piece of land being set a- 
side by City Council for that purpose and given by them to 
the Playground Commission to be used for this playground. 

Believing that the problem before us today is the proper 
use of the leisure time of our children, as it also is of all 
citizens, we try thru organization of leagues and organized 
athletics to keep as many busy doing something highly bene- 
ficial both as a means of developing physically, morally 
and mentally and as a safety-valve for pent-up energies, 
of which a boy and girl is literally full. Below will follow 
a brief out-line of some of our activities. 



150 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Each year we organize basket-ball leagues and this year 
we begun, for the first time, two leagues for boys and girls 
of what we call junior age (14 years and under). These 
two leagues have proven very satisfactory and gives more 
experience to the players who are to make our Senior teams 
and those of other organizations in the City in a few 
years. This means that six teams, consisting of seventy- 
two (72) girls and boys, had regular practice and match 
games thoroughly and efficiently managed* We have had 
two leagues for boys and girls, of what we call senior 
age (over 14 years of age), for several years. (The boys 
since 1917 and the girls since 1922). These boys and girls 
play a fine game of basket-ball. They have regular coach- 
ing and practice periods. There are seven teams in these two 
circuits, with eighty (80) boys and girls taking part. The 
Senior Leagues end their season with a banquet, given to 
all of the teams by the commission, at the Y.M.C.A Most of 
the members of the Commission attend. The Mayor always 
lends us his presence when it is possible. Rev. S. Cary 
Beckwith acted as Toast-Master at the past banquet, and 
did it in his usual pleasing manner. Speeches were made 
by the Mayor, Mrs. Tiedeman, Chairman of the Com- 
mission, Mr. H. J. Scofield and the prizes were awarded by 
Miss Louisa Poppenheim. These prizes were given to each 
member of the winning teams and the teams were given 
pennants. Sixty (60) games of basket-ball were played 
the past year under our supervision. The Junior Leagues 
were given an outing at Folly Beach as Finale. We have 
begun four leagues for the coming year, the first games be- 
ing played during the first week in December. 

Towards the last of March we put on an Athletic Meet 
for the boys and girls separately. Full entries, in the four- 
teen events, prove the interest taken. Ribbons for the first, 
second and third places were given. The playground win- 
ning the greatest number of points in both meets won a 
silver cup. Mitchell came into possession of the cup, hav- 
ing won it for three successive years, the required number 
of times. A silver and bronze medal were given the in- 
dividuals winning first and second places. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 151 

Our May Festival, for the past year, took the form of 
''An Old- English May Day/' We had this on the Pictures- 
que campus of Charleston College. Many of the spectators 
said it was the prettiest we have yet had. Little Miss Inez 
Arnholter, of Mitchell Playground, was the Queen, with 
Thelma Johnson of Marion and Ruby Herzog of Mall as 
Maid of Honor. These were chosen by popular vote. 
Dances of the different nations were featured, with the 
stately Minuet rounding it up. Three hundred and fif- 
ty (350) children took part and approximately seven- 
hundred spectators witnessed it. 

Base-ball plays a very important part in our programme. 
We begin playing at the close of school in June and continue 
into September. The past year we had four leagues for 
boys and two for girls (the girls playing with a playground 
base-ball). This means that we played one-hundred and 
eighty (180) games, with three-hundred and fifty (350) 
boys and girls taking part. Some days seventy-four (74) 
boys and girls were engaged in regular games of base-ball, 
besided the number of spectators the games drew. Pennants 
were awarded the winning teams, with individual trophies 
to the members of the teams. Mr. Charles de Vincau suc- 
cessfully handled the boys part of the programme this year. 

For several years we have rented the Y.W.C.A. pool 
for two mornings a week, during the warm months. Girls 
from the playgrounds (for white children) were given 
the privelege of using the pool, free of charge, and of 
learning to swim under the direction of one of the swimming 
instructors of the Y.W. Seventy-five per-cent of those us- 
ing the pool regularly learned to swim. We had a regular 
attendance of one hundred and eight (108) each day. We 
closed the Summer's work with a swimming Meet, in which 
there were six events contested. Ribbons were given to 
those winning first, second, third and fourth place in each 
•event. Mitchell won the team honors and came into pos- 
session of the first pennant given for swimming by the 
Playgrounds. 

Foot-ball was most popular with the boys this Fall, so 



152 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

much so, that I had goals put up on Mitchell, as it was the 
only playground large enough. There were match-games 
three days out of the week. These were closely directed 
on account of the danger of accidents. Next year we are 
going to introduce Soccer ball, as it seems to me to be par- 
ticularly suited to our needs. 

During the year we have individual events on each play- 
ground these take the form of Kite-tournaments, At-Home 
afternoons, hikes, truck rides, Christmas celebrations, Labor 
Days programmes etc. This is to stimulate community pride 

Quite a lovely donation was made the Mall Playground 
this Summer. Miss Henrietta Durant presented us with a 
libarary of one-hundred books. We have named the library 
for her. Miss Lucas, Director, has a regular system of 
letting out the books. This is filling a need, with even the 
Mothers and older members of the family as well as the 
children. Other donations to the Library have been receiv- 
ed lately and we now have one -hundred and fifty books. 

The past year stands out unique in that we had our first 
Inter City Playground encounter. Orangeburg Playground 
sent a delegation of thirty-five (35) children with their 
Directors and several interested citizens to us in September, 
to engage in match games of dodge-ball (both boys and 
girls), volley ball and tennis (boys). We won all except 
the boy's dodge ball. All of the games, except tennis, were 
played on Mitchell. After these games we came to the 
Y.W. on George Street, where the Directors and interested 
mothers served an appetizing dinner to the visitors and the 
local teams, who acted as hostesses and proved them- 
selves very fine at the job. After the tennis games at the 
Y.M.C.A., a swim was enjoyed in both the *'Y" Pools. It 
was a most successful day and will long be remembered by 
all. 

Story-telling and folk-dancing play an important part in 
our daily schedule, while knitting, crochet work and sew- 
ing are engaged in during the long Summer mornings. The 
Director gives advice and makes suggestions when needed. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 153 

The Colored Playground has begun the second stage in 
it's history. In the late Spring, we found it necessary to 
close the Playground, until we could get it in a permanent 
home. This was made necessary by the building of class- 
rooms in the yard, where we had the apparatus, thus taking 
up most of the play-space. It became dangerous to have 
the children play around where they were doing the work. 
After a request to City Council from the Commission, the 
North-west corner of president and Line Streets was given 
the Commission for a Playground.. We moved the appara- 
tus in less than a week and the playground was in full 
swing again by the last of July and was taking care of 
many more children than ever before. It is used to it's cap- 
acity every afternoon that the weather permits. This has 
met a great need in that section in keeping the children 
occupied and off the streets and thus out of mischief. The 
children have improved in their manners to a great extent 
also. We have a good worker as Director there. We find 
the colored children more careful of the equipment than 
the children on the white playgrounds. Little is lost or 
taken. We have match games among teams made up of 
boys on the playground and also contests of different kinds 
much interest is taken in the work by the colored people and 
they are very helpful to us. 

We would recommend for the coming year the establish- 
ment of kindergarten work for the small children, during the 
morning hours of our Summer session, this work to be 
directed by the Directors and Supervisor. This will give 
the small children something definite to do with their morn- 
ing hours and is very helpful also. 

We also recommend the establishment of carpentery, 
basquetry, weaving, sewing etc. for the older girls and boys, 
who are not interested particularly in the sports engaged 
in at that time and who find sun too hot to play in. The 
Directors v/ould carry this on. 

We also recommend the carrying on of the leagues and 
all other organized athletics we have hitherto engaged in, 
with a broadening in any direction we can. 



154 Mayor Grace's Animal Rcinew 

The personnel of the Playground staff is as follows : — 

Mitchell-Miss Hallie Snowden and Mr. George Owens. 
Marion-Miss Emmie Mayberry and Mr. David Hart. 
Mall-Miss Betty Lucas and Mr. Andrew Kelly. 
Colored-Beulah Crawford. 

We are fortunate in having such a splendid corp of workers, 
who are always intensely interested in the work and the chil- 
dren under their supervision. 

We are looking forward to the w^ork during the coming 
year and a joy to be a factor in this great work to make the 
Playgrounds a social center in the neighborhood. 

Respectfully Submitted 

CORRINE JONES, 

Supervisor. 



Financial Report, December 31, 1923. 

Am't. Am't. 

Budget Items Expended Allowed 

Salaries 5,200.00 5,200.00 

Equip. & SuppHes 800.00 800.00 

Repairs \ 1,400.00 1,400.00 

Meets and Festivals 200.00 200.00 

Miscellaneous 400.00 400.00 

Total 8,000.00 $8,000.00 

Budget for 1924 

Salaries $ 5,200.00 

Repairs - 1,400.00 

Equipment & Supplies 1,000.00 

Meets & Festivals 200.00 

Miscellaneous 400.00 



$ 8,200.00 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezu 155 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF COLONIAL 

COMMON AND ASHLEY RIVER 

EMBANKMENT 



To the Honorable Mayor 
and City Council 

The Board of Commissioners of Colonial Lake and Ash- 
ley River Embankment, respectfully submit the following 
financial report for the year 1923 : 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TREASURER FOR THE YEAR 1923 

Receipts 

Balance turned over by R. P. Evans, Treasurer $ 300.68 

Rent Anderson Spool & Bobbin Company, 

June 11, 1923 250.00 

Rent Anderson Spool & Bobbin Company, 

October 10, 1923 .- _ 250.00 

Rent Anderson Spool & Bobbin Company, 

November 10, 1923 250.00 

$ 1,050.68 

Disbursements 

Salary, Peter King, week ending April 28, 1923, to 

week ending December 29, 1923 $ 720.00 

Chas. Dry Dock & Machine Co., repairing flood gate 8.40 

Adam Roessler, sharpening lawn mower and shears 

July 11th 2.50 

Adam Roessler, sharpening lawn mower and shears 

September 29th 2.50 

Ball Supply Co., new lawn mower, wheelbarrow 

and -^arts for mower _ 30.90 

$ 764.30 

Balance in Bank January 1, 1924 $ 286.38 

R. C. RICHARDSON, 

Treasurer. 



156 Mayor Grace's Annual Revinv 

COMMISSIONERS OF MARION SOUARE 



Charleston, S. C, January 14, 1924 

To the Honorable Thos. P. Stoney, Mayor 

and Members of City Council of Charleston 

The Commissioners of Marion Square wish to report 
that during the year 1923 quite a number of improvements 
were made which added to the looks of Marion Square. 
The matter of lighting Calhoun Monument which had be- 
come almost a public nuisance, has been solved. All curb- 
ing was taken up and reset. Trees were trimmed for the 
first time in years. Drains opened and new gratings placed. 
We were handicapped in cutting grass due to our not hav- 
ing a mowing machine and lack of funds to secure one. It 
was necessary for us to buy all new tools due to the Citadel, 
whose tools we had been using, moving to their new site. 

We wish to recommend the following special appropria- 
tion for 1924 in viev/ of the early opening of the Francis 
Marion Hotel: that Fifteen hundred ($1500.00) Dollars 
be allowed for placing ornamental poles on the inner edge 
of each grass plot, the wires to be placed underground. We 
believe that this will prove a wonderful improvement. Our 
regular expenses can be taken care of by the following 
amounts : 

Keeper $ 900.00 

Lights 250.00 

Labor 100.00 

Supplies 1 50.00 

Incidentals 100.00 

New Lights 1,500,00 



$ 3,000.00 



H. O. WITHINGTON, Chairman, 

Commissioners of Marion Square. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 157 

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON 
Report of College Trustees. 



To the Honorable 

The City Council of Charleston : 

The Board of Trustees of the College of Charleston beg 
leave herewith to submit the Annual Report of the work 
accomplished at the College during the year 1923. This 
report was prepared by Dr. Harrison Randolph, the presi- 
dent of the College faculty, and fully sets forth the trans- 
actions for the year above mentioned. 

The situation at the College is most encouraging. The 
capacity of the institution to accommodate the very great- 
ly increased number of students seeking an education has 
been severely strained, and if the number continues to in- 
crease additional accommodation will become necessary. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Board of Trustees of College of Charleston 

JOHN F. FICKEN, President 



There is submitted herewith the annual report of the 
College for the year ending December 31, 1923. 

The conspicuous feature of the recent development of 
the College has been its rapid expansion since becoming a 
free institution for residents of the city and county of Char- 
leston. The enrollment of students is the largest the Col- 
lege has ever had. There are 194 students in the college 
classes and 179 students in the Night School of Commerce, 
making a total enrolment of 373 students. In the College 
classes thre are 112 men and 82 women; in the School of 
Commerce there are 126 men and 53 women; thus of the 
total attendance 238 are men and 135 are women. In the 
School of Commerce the entire enrolment of 179 students 
represents the city or county of Charleston. In the College 



158 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcznezc 

classes 149 students are from the city or county, and 45 
from other places. Of the latter, 36 are from the interior 
of the State, representing 22 counties; 4 are from Georgia; 
and 1 each from \'irginia. North Carolina, Louisiana, Mis- 
souri and Massachusetts. 

To provide for this largely increased attendance there has 
been such increase in the facilities and teaching force of the 
College as its resources have permitted. There are now four- 
teen professors in the Faculty, eight student-assistants, and 
seven officers of administration including the registrar, li- 
brarian, secretaries, etc. For the college classes there are 
ten departments of instruction with thirteen professors giv- 
ing sixty different courses. In the Xight School of Com- 
merce six professors give nine different courses. This pro- 
gramme of free public instruction costs the city and coimt}" 
of Charleston annually for the 328 Charleston students in 
attendance the amount oi S144 per student. It is interest- 
ing to note that statistics show this amount to be less than 
one-third the amount per student expended by the the State 
in the various State colleges. 

With the gratification which is naturally felt at the ex- 
pansion of the College and its greater opportunity for public 
sen'ice, there is also the fear that gro^\-th at the present rate 
may put too heavy a burden upon the College f-acilities and 
teaching force, unless m.eans can be found to increase these 
facilities and provide adequately for a growing student- 
body which has in the last four years more than quadrupled 
itself. 

Maixtexaxce of Standards. 

Another problem which the increased enrolment has 
brought is the greater difficult}* in m.aintaining the high 
standard of scholarship of the College. With a small care- 
fully selected student-body there was greater opportunit}- for 
personal contact oi teacher and student and, wherever need- 
ed, special, individual auention could be readily given. With 
greater numbers the same sort of contact is impracticable. 



Mayor Grace's Anmial Review 159 

and yet a rigorous maintenance of standards is more than 
ever necessary. Naturally, there are many who are attrac- 
ted to the College as a pleasant place to pass a year or two. 
Such students soon reveal a negligent attitude towards their 
college work that is contagious and demoralizing. In order 
to keep up the traditional standard of scholarly work the 
College regulations require that every student's record shall 
show at the end of each year a general rating of at least 
50 per cent excellence; otherwise, the student is dropped 
for scholastic deficiencies. Last June, fourteen such stud- 
ents were dropped from the regular classes. This was 10 
per cent of the enrollment at that time. The same test^ will 
be enforced in June of each year, and any student whose 
work fails to measure up to this required standard will be 
dropped. 

Night School of Commerce:. 

The enrolment of 179 students in the Night School shows 
a substantial increase over the enrolment of last year. The 
higher entrance requirements which were exacted this year 
did not cut dovm the enrolment ; the experience of the year 
has shown on the contrary, that in consequence of this 
higher admission standard the attendance has held up more 
steadily than last year. An encouraging feature has been 
the re-enrolment of a large percentage of those who success- 
fully completed the courses offereed last year. Forty-four 
out of about sixty such students returned for other courses. 
The expansion of the scope of night instruction has greatly 
widened its appeal. Instead of two courses, as given last 
year, nine courses have been offered this year embracing in- 
struction in accounting, economics, advanced marketing, 
money and banking, business law, foreign trade, business 
Spanish, business English, and industrial chemistry. Among 
the students in the School of Commerce, there are 34 
managers (men in head positions,) 47 clerks (including 
bookkeepers and salesmen), 15 teachers, 23 stenographers, 
4 technical men, 3 city officials, 1 state legislator, and 4 
farmers. The gratifying response from business circles to 



160 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

this new development in the instruction offered by the Col- 
lege, shows that it is meeting a definite need in the life of the 
community. 

Faculty and Officers. 

In June, 1923, Professor Thomas della Torre resigned 
from the chair of classics, and in October Professor N. W. 
Stephenson resigned from the chair of history. The pro- 
fessors elected by the Trustees during the spring of 1923 
assumed charge of their departments at the beginning of the 
session, namely, C. A. Graeser, M. A., professor of romance 
languages; Horatio Hughes, Ph.D., professor of chemistry; 
and P. G. Moorhead, Ph.D., professor of Latin and Greek. 
Later in the summer Professor A. L. Geisenheimer was 
elected professor of economics, Professor P. R. Weidner, 
acting associate professor of English, Dr. R. S. MacElwee 
was secured to deliver lectures during the present session on 
foreign trade, and Acting-Professor J. H. Easterby was 
elected professor of history. In order to relieve in some 
measure the heavy strain put upon some of the departments 
of instruction by the rapid increase in the number of stud- 
ents, it has been necessary to increase the list of student-as- 
sistants. These positions are held by the following students : 
L. S. Miles, biology ; J. Addlestone, physics ; S. K. Johnson, 
chemistry; H. S. McGillivray, Jr., chemistry; M. E. Mc- 
Laughlin, history; M. A. McLaughlin, Jr., mathematics; 
C. E. deVineau, Spanish; A. Walsh, library-assistant in 
history. 

Scholarships. 

The award of scholarships in October, 1923, was as fol- 
lows : On the Boyce foundation, to L. S. Miles, S. K. John- 
son, Sarah Griswold, Laura O. Roberts; on the O'Neill 
foundation, to D. C. Barfield ; and on the Cohen foundation, 
to W. H. Cross. Anastasia Walsh was continued as the 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review , 161 

holder of the Miles scholarship, and F. H. Bailey as bene- 
ficiary of the Julian F. Nohrden fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRISON RANDOLPH, 

President. 



REPORT OF COLLEGE TRUSTEES 

Cash Transactions of the City College fund January 1, 1923 
to December 31, 1923. 

In Account with City Treasurer of Charleston January 1, 
1923 to December 31, 1923: 

To Cash received from City Treasurer : 

Appropriation for necessary ex 
penses of Maintenances over and 
above Income derived from In- 
come from Endowment Fund as 

follows $24,507.59 

By Cash paid for Salaries and 

Expenses $24,507.59 



$24,507.59 $24,507.59 
Respectfully submitted, 

G. L. B. RIVERS, 
Treasurer Board of Trustees, College of 
Charleston. 



162 ' Mayor Grace's Annual Rcz'iew 

THE CHARLESTON MUSEUM 



Charleston, S. C, January 15, 1924 

Hon. Thomas P. Stoncy, Mayor, 

and the City Council of Charleston. 

Gentlemen : — 

In compliance with your request, I have the honor to 
forward the report of the Director of the Charleston 
Museum to the Trustees, giving an account of the work of 
the Museum for the year 1923. 

Very respectfully, 

CHARLES W. KOLLOCK, 

President, Board of Trustees, 
The Charleston Museum. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM 
FOR THE YEAR 1923. 



To the Trustees of the Charleston Museum : 

I have the honor to submit the following report for the 
year 1923: 

This has been the biggest year in the one hundred and 
fifty years of the Museum's history. Taking up first the 
question of attendance — it is with not only pleasure but as- 
tonishment that I am able to report to you an increase of 
over 7000 in the number of visitors to the Museum during 
1923 as compared with 1922. In my last report I gave 
you figures by months for attendance since 1919. Omitting 
the detail, the attendance for the last five years is as follows : 

1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 

30,341 38,717 49,103 50,536 57,971 

The increase this year is the more remarkable since we 
have had very few special openings since the spring. During 



Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv 163 

the anniversary meeting in April we did not register at- 
tendance after the first day, so as to avoid counting visitors 
more than once. 

The outstanding feature of the year is, of course, the 
celebration of the Museum's one hundred and fiftieth an- 
niversary in April. As all Charleston knows, the American 
Association of Museums held its eighteenth annual meeting 
in Charleston, April 4th to 8th, for the observance of this 
most significant date in American museum history. Char- 
leston extended the warmest hospitality to the Museum's 
Guests and I am happy to report to you that without excep- 
tion, no one in Charleston or Charleston county refused to 
help the Museum in any one of the many and varied ways it 
asked for assistance. And the assistance volunteered was 
most valuable and at times surprising. 

Most important for the preparation of the Museum for 
this anniversary was the special appropriation of $4000 
granted by City Council for repairs and improvements to 
the building. With this appropriation the building was 
painted outside, the roof, with the exception of a strip on 
the north side, was coated in with the Southern Cotton Oil 
Company's roofing preparation, the original faulty construc- 
tion of the windows around the galleries was corrected as 
far as possible, a new chimney was 'ouilt, gutters were re- 
newed, and the north door steps were repaired; inside, the 
south gallery was floored and finished, the rear hall leading 
to the lecture room was sheathed in, and the entire build- 
ing re-kalsomined, plastered and painted wherever necess- 
ary. 

With these improvements and the building once more 
tight it becarne possible to install all the galleries, to re-ar- 
range the main hall so that the existing exhibits could be 
logically placed, and the new exhibits can be added 
where the cultural or natural history story they are to 
tell calls for them. The general culture exhibit down 
stairs is therefore, to be developed according to plans worked 
out several years ago. Upstairs, the north gallery is as- 
signed to the South Carolina industrial exhibits, particular- 
ly those of Charleston County. The east and south galler- 



164 Mayor Grace's Annual Revinv 

ics can now be devoted to the preservation of whatever 
pertains to the part Hfe of the people of South Carolina. 
The first work of the new year in the galleries will be on 
the industrial exhibits. The additions to the galleries during 
the past year and the new material given for installation 
during 1924 would require a report of their own for ade- 
quate description. 

In anticipation of the Museum's anniversary, the Cliarlcs- 
ton county delegation gave proof of its consciousness of 
the value of the Museum's worth to the community by a 
special appropriation of two thousand dollars for prepara- 
tion for and entertainment of the American Association 
of Museum's. Among other things this provided the en- 
tertainment of the convention not privately contributed by 
individuals and nearly three of the six plate-glass Library 
Bureau-built exhibition cases erected during the year; the 
other cases were purchased from the regular county appro- 
priation. Included in the county entertainment of our 
guests was the Santee house-party, which was generally pro- 
claimed the most delightful single episode in the history of 
American museums. Charleston visitors to the north and 
west this summer brought back word of delighted appre- 
ciation of what Charleston did for its anniversary guests 
and always with special reference to two phases of her hospi- 
tality, the opening of the homes of Charleston for their re- 
ception and the house party on South Santee. 

This house party was made possible by the unprecedented 
kindness of the Santee Gun Club which placed its club house 
and grounds, its superintendent and attendants, and its 
boats and reserves at the disposal of the Museum. The 
owners of the plantations up the Santee entertained all 
guests beyond the capacity of the Gun Club, and the Bish- 
op of Lower South Carolina arranged for a special service 
in Old Wambaw Church as a fitting conclusion to the whole 
anniversary meeting. Guests to this meeting had come to 
Charleston from the farthest limits of the United States and 
from Canada. They were of the type of people who can 
best appreciate what Charleston has been, is and stands for. 
They went back to their homes telling an enthusiastic story 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 165 

of Charleston and their days in it. They have not stinted 
to give printed expression to this enthusiasm. Local papers, 
metropolitan papers, magazines, and reports and publica- 
tions of museums and learned societies have alike published 
the story of the Charleston meeting for the one hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary of its Museum. In numberless 
ways the Museum is already experiencing benefits from 
this bringing of the museums of the country to Charleston, 
and with enlarged hotel service the city is going to add 
many thousands to its tourists as the result of the publicity 
this anniversary has broadcast. 

The trustees of the Museum and the director personally 
have made an effort to express their very deep and lasting 
appreciation to each of the many individuals and organiza- 
tions who assisted the Museum in preparation for, and en- 
tertainment of, the Museum's anniversary guests. Char- 
leston made this anniversary a community celebration and 
the Museum extends to the people of Charleston its thanks 
and its pledge of service to them. 

A delightful aftermath of the convention is the so-called 
Poe Group, by Dwight Franklin. This is a miniature model- 
ed scene of Edgar Allan Poe on Sullivian's Island. Poe 
had come to Sullivan's Island in the artillery service, hav- 
ing enlisted under the name of Edgar A. Perry. January 1, 
1829 he was raised to the rank of sergeant-major. On 
January 12th he reached his twentieth birthday. Mr. 
Franklin has chosen this month and has created a concep- 
tion of Poe which satisfies our feeling of what he must 
have been during this troubled period of his life. The Poe 
Group is the gift of a number of the visitors at the anniver- 
sary meeting. Our warmest thanks is theirs : 

A group of ladies in attendance from the Women's 
Auxiliary of the Children's Museum of the Brooklyn In- 
stitute, Members of the American Association of Museums 
on the Santee houseparty. 

Miss Caroline Sinkler, 
Mr. John D. Mcllhenny, 
Mr. James L. Coker. 



166 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Illustrations of the Poe Group have been published in the 
Literary Digest, The New York Evening Post's pictorial 
supplement, in numbers of Southern newspapers, in the 
Year Book of the Poetry Society of South Carolina, and in 
Paris. 

The Museum has two other examples of Mr. Franklin's 
art: a spirited figure of an Iroquois Indian which is Mr. 
Franklin's anniversary gift to the Museum, and a ''daylight 
group" illustrating in the general culture exhibit an Egyptian 
trading vessel in a Cyprus harbor exchanging pottery and 
copper implements for lumber and copper ore. This is the 
gift of Miss CaroHne Sinkler. 

An important gift following the Santee houseparty is a 
large cellection of wrought iron, including plantation-made 
implements and a pair of beautiful gates. These, a ten- 
bushel rice measure made from an old wine cask, a huge 
trough-like tub for washing blankets, and a quaint old baby 
xarriage are among the articles from The Wade. Mr. David 
Doar, our trustee from South Santee, has added to his 
valuable gifts a coach box, a sort of suit case in the days 
of coach travel, and a drawer to the implements contributed 
by himself and his brother, Mr. Samuel C. Doar, to the 
turpentine industry exhibit for w^hich Mr. W. T. Harper has 
presented a pine tree boxed in both old and modern fashion. 

One of the most valuable gifts of the year is from Mrs. 
Charles H. Bassett, of Summit, New Jersey, in recognition 
of which Mrs. Bassett has been made a life patron of the 
Museum. The gift makes an interesting costume exhibit 
by itself and, combined with the Museum's already distinc- 
tive exhibit and with other new material presented this 
year, will form a collection excelled only in the larger 
museums. 

The gifts and deposits during 1923 number over 487 ac- 
cessions representing some 1200 catalogued items. A few 
of general interest will be described in the forth-coming 
numbers of the Quarterly, such as the gift of culture mater- 
ial made in the name of Miss Anne T. Colcock, twenty-four 
4-foot logs presented for the timber exhibit by the A. C. 
Tuxbury Lumber Company, the Francis W. Holmes collec- 



Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiu 167 

tion of deer antlers, the marine exhibit, and the World War 
exhibit, material for which has been deposited by members 
of the American Legion. 

With one exception this report will not discuss the changes 
in exhibits made during the year since these were so exten- 
sive as to cover practically the entire Museum, the work of 
installation being not confined to new exhibits but to the 
improvement and re-arrangement of the old and a more 
systematic grouping of the whole. The exception to which 
I wish to call special attention is the new Library Bureau 
case in the entrance hall, which contains the specimens 
which have been longest in the Museum, presented, in fact, 
before any other Museum now surviving in America, was 
founded. There is now on hand a remarkably interesting 
lot of material for installation during 1924 and the Museum 
will start the year well equipped for development of its 
exhibits and for more efficient public instruction work. 

Included in the work already under way is a series of 
miniature, artificially lighted groups illustrating the Drama 
of White Civilization. The first three of these will be ex- 
hibited in January, the others will follow. They are to be 
placed in a room by themselves, dark except for the light 
within the groups, and will form a fascinating introduction 
to the general culture exhibit. They are being made by Mr. 
Edward I. R. Jennings and the interest on the William M. 
Bird bequest for part of 1923 and for 1924 will be devoted 
to them. 

While not a regular member of the Museum staff, Mr. 
Jennings is further doing valuable public instruction work. 
His Saturday morning hand-work class in the making of 
historical stage settings has worked truly astonishing re- 
sults among the boys and girls, and the new series of 
school exhibits by him will be the delight of the children 
throughout the county. Two already finished show, with 
paint and modeling, a Cherokee Indian village and a theatre 
of the time of Shakespeare. 

I am happy to report that Mr. E. Burnham Chamberlain 
and Mr. Alexander Sprunt, Jr., have become regular mem- 
bers of the Museum staff, Mr. Chamberlain as chief of the 



168 Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv 

preparation department and Mr. Sprunt as ornithologist, 
under Mr. Arthur T. Wayne, our honorary curator of or- 
nithology. Through the kindness of Mr. W. deC. Ravenel, 
Mr. Chamherlain has been studying in the National Museum 
for the last seven months and Mr. Sprunt was there for two 
months during the summer. We are greatly indebted to 
the National Museum for the assistance thus extended to 
us and also to Mr. Wayne for the kindness he has shown 
in teaching Mr. Sprunt the fine points of ornithological 
preparation which have made Wayne bird skins unique for 
excellence in the collections of the country. Mr. Wayne 
has expressed himself as willing to "back Mr. Sprunt's 
work" and we are, therefore, certain that we can have no 
one more skilful to develop the Museum's bird exhibits. 
Mr. Sprunt's first work in 1924 will be the re-installation 
of the South Carolina water birds on the plan followed in 
his installation of the land birds last spring. Meanwhile 
he will be collecting material for a large duck group to 
show the species a sportsman may hope to see on an old 
South Carolina rice field. 

Mr. Chamberlain has specialized in the mounting of the 
smaller mammals as well as deer. We have just received 
enthusiastic thanks from Mrs. Dan Denny of the Young 
Harriman, Tennessee, museum, for a marmoset which Mr. 
Chamberlain mounted for her from a skin provided by the 
National Museum. The Harriman Museum is one of the 
small, new southern museums which has called on the 
Charleston Museum for aid and it is good that we have 
been able to furnish loan exhibits which have helped while 
the museum was building up collections of its own. 

Mr. Chamberlain's first large work will be exhibits for 
the north gallery illustrating the industries of Charleston 
county. With Mr. Chamberlain and Mr. Sprunt on the 
stafY, the Museum will be glad to fill requests for the motmt- 
ing of birds and animals such as have been coming in for 
years. All outside work undertaken by the Museum will be 
done with the Museum's guarantee for quality. 

As had been expected for some time, Mr. Edward A. 
Hyer resigned in the spring and is now working indepen- 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 169 

dently, having recently completed a series of beautiful 
bird groups for the Nashville museum. Mrs. Hyer has 
been granted an indefinite leave of absence in order to assist 
Mr. Hyer. An announcement of Mrs. Hyer's attractive 
book of poems, Santee Songs, will appear in the next num- 
ber of the Quarterly. 

Miss Bessie P. Ravenel has been transferred from the 
volunteer to the regular staff and is in charge of the gal- 
leries. During the summer months, Miss Helen McCormack 
acted most acceptably as assistant in the children's work, and 
Miss Virginia Rugheimer was in charge Sunday afternoons. 
Miss Azalea H. Willis and Miss Susie W. Henderson have 
continued as part time assistants. 

Except for the changes noted above the staff remains the 
same as last year. Miss Porcher has extended her excellent 
work with the children, increasing the amount of reference 
w^ork with schools, and broadening the activities of the 
Boys' and Girls' Room. Aside from her innumerable duties 
at the Museum, Miss Richardson has found time to build 
up for the Museum a catalogued collection of over five 
thousand different stamps and to contribute a valuable re- 
search article to the Quarterly on Charleston fire marks. 
This article has given rise to an active correspondence show- 
ing a surprising interest in these little-known survivals of 
the early insurance companies. 

The honorary curators have been particularly active this 
year. Mr. Wayne has assisted and contributed constantly. 
Mr. Mazyck has laid out for exhibition as much of the Dr. 
Edmund Ravenel shell collection as the three fine new Lib- 
rary Bureau cases will hold. This exhibit is to have attrac- 
tive additions and to be completed during the coming year. 
Professor Earle Sloan has spent months in the preparation 
and installation of the South Carolina geology collection, a 
large part of which is of his own gathering. Special publica- 
tions in regard to both the Ravenel Shell and the South 
Carolina Geology collections will appear later. Mr. Bennett 
has, as usual, been indefatigable in his interest. His know- 
ledge of South Carolina culture material, and that of the 
experts from the big northern museums so kindly and con- 



170 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

tiiuiously tendered, make available for ns a type of informa- 
tion to be gained only tbron^h lon.^ years of study on the 
part of the specialist. 

Notable amon^" the publications of the Museum is Mr. 
Bennett's brochure published in the spring as Contribution 
No. 4 from the Charleston Museaun, under the title Apoth- 
ecaries' Hall, a Uni([ue l{xbibit at the Charleston Museum. 
An Ancient Drug-Shop whose Business Survived Plagues, 
Wars, Great Fires and Karthciuakes for One Hundred and 
Forty Years. Aside from the extensive demands for it in 
this country, numbers of recjuests for copies have come from 
Europe. The Museum has several interesting contributions 
ready for publication early in the year but of widest appeal 
and of inestimable value for the preservation of a South 
Carolina story which might otherw'ise be lost, is Mr. David 
Doar's history of rice culture in South Carolina, particularly 
on lowxr Santee. This was written for the Museum and 
carries a human interest as beautiful as it is tragic. 

As I have said before, 1923 was the Museum's biggest 
year. For 1924 we shall have more restricted resources and 
will need to choose with great care the lines of work to be 
pursued so as to secure large returns from limited income. 
At a hearing before the Charleston County Delegation in 
November, the president of the Museum and the director 
asked for the continuance for 1924 of the usual ^ mill 
tax for the Museum, this being the equivalent of the amount 
granted in 1923 with out the $2000, special appropriation 
so kindly given. Your representatives further asked for a 
separate appropriation for ''the establishment and mainte- 
nance of a free library for all^ Charleston County; free to 
every man, woman, and child of sufficient age in Charleston 
County ; this library to be known as the Charleston County 
Public Library and its funds administered by the Museum 
on a budget separate from the Museum budget, wath a sep- 
arate annual report and accoiuiting to the County delega- 
tion ; all books purchased from the library appropriation 
to bear a separate book-plate to distinguish them from the 
10,000 books already in the Museum library and from such 
books as the Museum may in future purchase or have 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezu 171 

given it; the distinction between library and Museum prop- 
erty to be carefully maintained, so that a separation of the 
library from the Museum could be easily made, if in future 
the two institutions outgrew each other or it became, for 
any reason, desirable to maintain them under separate 
roofs." 

The plan for this library was carefully outlined in the 
Evening Post of December 3rd, and will be further discussed 
in the Director's report to the County Delegation. Up to 
the present, members of the Delegation have expressed 
themselves as earnstly in favor of this plan and the grant- 
ing of the appropriation requested for it. 

In conformity with the action of the trustees at their meet- 
ing of December 28th, I would recommend that City Coun- 
cil be asked for $6000, for the maintenance budget. This 
will be $3000, less than was granted the Museum last year 
and $90.00 less than the maintenance appropriation 5 years 
ago. The item.s of expenditure for maintenance are given 
in detail on the copy of the budget to be sent to the Ways 
and Means Committee of City Council. 

With $6000, from the City for maintenace, % mill from 
the County for educational work and growth, and with the 
appropriation asked for the organization and maintenance 
of The Charleston County Public Library it should be possi- 
ble with strict economy to maintain the two institutions on 
an efficient basis. With less the undertaking of the Library 
would be absolutely impossible. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank the trustees collectively 
and individually for the way in which they supported and 
assisted me in the strenuous days of preparation for the an- 
niversary celebration, and to add a special word of grati- 
tude to the secretary for the many responsibilities of which 
he relieved me and to Mr. Ellison A. Williams for the effici- 
ent way in which he provded transportation for our guests 
from the time they arrived until they left. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LAURA M. BRAGG, 

Director. 



172 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Statement of Expenditures of City Appropriation 
EOR THE Year 1923 

Extracted from report of the treasurer of the Charleston 
Museum. 

Expenditure of $9000, appropriated by the City of Char- 
leston for special repairs and part maintenance expenses of 
the Charleston Museum for the year 1923, educational work, 
new exhibits, and installation being supported by a county 
tax and by contributions. 

Special repairs $4,000.00 

Maintenance salaries (in part) 

Director, secretary, and one janitor 2,860.00 

Building Maintenance 

Including light, heat, water, plumbing, and roof 
repairs, stove piping, kalsomining and paint- 
ing beyond work provided for in special re- 
pairs, extra cleaning, cleaning material, laun- 
dry and incidentals 1,619.39 

Carpenter Shop Maintenance 54.15 

Administration Maintenance 220.50 

Library Maintenance 245.96 

$9,000.00 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 173 

HIGH SCHOOL OF CHARLESTON 



To President and Trustees 

of ihe High School of Charleston. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to make the following report in regard 
to the work and condition of the High School for the past 
year. 

The following table shows the number of pupils enrolled 
and their distribution in the three departments of the school 
during the last six months of the 1922-23 session and the 
first three months of the 1923-24 session : 

January 1st to June 20th 





Classical 


Scientific 


Com'l. 


Total 


First Class .... 


28 


24 


23 


75 


Second Class 


30 


24 


49 


103 


Third Class 


94 




56 


150 


Fourth Class 


140 




68 


208 



Total 292 48 196 536 

September 24th to December 31st. 





Classical 


Scientific 


Com'l. 


Total 


First Class 


27 


28 


13 


68 


Second Class 


35 


36 


19 


90 


Third Class 


77 




70 


147 


Fourth Class 


107 




103 


210 



Total 246 64 205 515 

Of the 536 pupils in attendance during session ending in 
June, 472 were from the City Public Schools, under a con- 
tract with the City Board of School Commissioners and the 
amount paid for their tuition was $16,000.00. The number 
of pupils enrolled whose parents reside outside of the city, 
was 47, and the amount paid by the State Board of Educa- 
tion for their tuition was $2,335.00. 



174 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

The City Council has continued its interest in the insti- 
tution and has pursued its customary liberal poHcy in mak- 
ing generous appropriations for the support of the school. 

The following are the sums voted for the year 1923 : 

Contract with Board of Trustees $ 4,000.00 

Maintenance and Repairs 3,000.00 

Teacliers' Salaries 20,800.00 

Clerk to Principal 720.00 

Athletics 1,000.00 

Coach for Major Athletic 1,200.00 

$30,720.00 

The Trustees elected the following teachers for Session 
1923-24. 

Robert V. Roy all, Principal. 

Thomas F. Mosiman, Vice-Principal — English. 

Clyde O. Ackerman, History. 

Hervey Allen, English. 

Paul G. Anderson, Latin. 

Geo. A. Byrd, Science and English. 

Norman A. Chamberlain, Jr., Latin. 

W. Hoyt Cook, Latin and Greek. 

A. C. Corcoran, English. 

Leopoldo Doltz, Spanish. 

Horace H. Early, Mathematics. 

John B. Farrow, History. 

Hal S. Fewell, Physics and Chemistry. 

Geo. D. Grice, Com'l Subjects. 

J. Earle Griffin, French. 

Robert B. Jarvis, Com'l Subjects. 

Harold E. Jervey, Science. 

Albert J. Kahrs, Mathematics. 

Geo. W. Mclver, French. 

Fred S. MuUer, Mathematics. 

J. Alvin Tiedemann, Com'l Subjects. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



175 



At the closing exercises of the eighty-fourth annual ses- 
sion of the school held in the auditorium of the institution 
on June 23rd a class of 34 young men — the largest in the 
history of the school — having met the requirements for 
graduation, received from the President of the Board, Mr. 
M. V. Haselden, the certificates showing that they had com- 
pleted the course of study required in the several depart- 
ments. 



The following are the names of the graduates : 



Robert Waller Achurch, Jr. 
Jacob Tabor Bair, Jr. 
David Coulson Barfield 
Ivon Hayes Blackman, Jr. 
Charles Rossiler Burbage 
William Henry Burton 
John William Douglas 
Francis Ferdinand Drowota, 
Arthur Franklin Edwards 
James Clark Fletcher 
Walter Guerry Green, Jr. 
Mona Samuel Harris 
Carl Frederick Heins 
Willard Newman Hirsch 
Joseph Hutchinson 
Henry Walker Jordan, Jr. 
Andrew John Kelly 



John Hasel Knobeloch 
Donald Hope McCall 
Kenneth Prothro MacMillan 
Henry George Mencken 
Joseph Richard Moorer 
James William Nantz 
Johannes Vilhilm Nielson, Jr. 
Jr. Sherrod Harvey Owens 

Theodore Hamlin Petterson 
Isadore Schreiberg 
Holmes Alfred Semken 
Joseph Abraham Shahid 
Albert Stemmermann 
William Harold Stender 
Albert Prince ^aylor 
William Bay VanNess, Jr. 
Vernon Wylie Weston 



The Colcock Conduct Medal, by the vote of his class- 
mates, was awarded to Albert Stemmermann. Both the 
Walter M. Whitehead mathematics medal and the Rene 
Jervey Scholarship medal were won by D. Coulson Barfield. 

The medals were presented by Col. Alfred Huger, who 
gave the history of each medal and exhorted the recipients 
to live up to the high standards of manhood and character 
symboHzed by these emblems. 

E. Willoughby Middleton, Esq., a High School graduate 
in the class of 1908, delivered a forceful, instructive address 
to the graduating class. 

Respectfully submitted, 



R. V. ROY ALL, 
Principal, High School of Charleston, 



176 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

REPORT 

CITY BOARD OF PUBLIC SCHOOL COM- 
MISSIONERS 

for the City of Charleston for the year ending June 30, 1923, 

pursuant to Act of the General Assembly, approved 

February 24, 1908. (27 Vol. Statute, page 1349) 



The City Treasurer is by law the custodian of the funds 
coming from ordinary sources to the City Board of Public 
School Commissioners for the City of Charleston. The 
following account of the City Treasurer for the year ending 
June 30, 1923, shows the amounts received by him for the 
Public Schools of the City as well as the amounts paid by 
him to the Clerk of the Board during the same period. The 
account of the Clerk of the Board hereinafter given shows 
the disbursement of these funds. The account of the Clerk 
of the Board shows further the proceeds and disbursements 
of the special Bond Account. The accounts of the City 
Treasurer and of the Clerk of the Board further show the 
transactions in connection with the debt service, viz., in- 
terest on bonds, and sinking fund. 

By special arrangement this session, the Board of Public 
School Commissioners paid to the Board of Trustees of 
the High School of Charleston $16,000 for which any boy 
who had graduated at one of the White Elementary Public 
Schools was entitled to attend the High School free of 
charge and was allowed his choice between the Classical 
and Commercial Courses. 

A. B. RHETT, 

Superintendent 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 177 

CHARLESTON ORPHAN HOUSE. 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 

GEO. W. WILLIAMS, Chairman.* 
JWALTER PRINGLE, Chairman. 
HAMPTON LOGAN, Vice-Chairman ProTem. 
Robert H. Duryea Henry A. Molony 

Henry H. Ficken Andrew B. Murray 

Melvin Furchgott Walter Pringle 

Isaac W. Hirsch Sidney S. Riggs 

A. Cramer Koester Otto F. Wieters 

§ Ellison A. Williams. 

Principal and Executive Head 
Mrs. ELIZABETH L. PAYNE. 

Superintendent of School 
J. P. SMITH. 

Teachers 

Miss Mary E. Hamlin Miss Lula B. Ham 

Miss Emma McCallman Miss Lucia P. Hutchinson 

Miss Barnwell R. Williams Miss Alice Smith 

Miss Verona Harrelson Miss Anna Cory 

Organist and Instructor of Music 
Miss ELLA I. HYAMS. 

Librarian 
Miss MARY E. McNEiLL 



* Died April 27, 1923. 
t Elected May 3rd, 1923. 
§ ElecJted May 8th, 1923. 



178 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviczv 

Serving Department 
Miss DORA SWEATMAN. 

Matro'its 

Miss Eulalie Escoffier Mrs. Annie Gruber 

Miss Josie Seabrook Mrs. Lula Miles 

Mrs. Eliza Wyndham Mrs. Eliza Gardner 

Mrs. Lottie Catterton Mrs. Letha Minis 

Miss Stella Brunson 

Housekeeper 
Mrs. R. N. BANNER. 

Engineer 
ASHLEY L. BARTON. 

Assistant Engineer 
W. G. HOFFMAN. 

Medical Faculty 

Dr. T. GRANGE SIMONS 

Dr. CHARLES W. KOLLOCK 

Dr. R. McIVER WILBUR 

Secretary and Treasurer of the Board 
EDWARD H. PINCKNEY. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 179 

STANDING COMMITTEES: 



COMMITTEE ON IMPROVEMENT AND 
DISCIPLINE. 

WALTER PRINGLE, Ex-Officio Chairman. 
Sidney S. Riggs W. Hampton Logan 

Henry A. Molony A. Cramer Koster 

Otto F. Wieters Ellison A. Williams 

Andrew B. Murray 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOOLS 
Henry H. Ficken, Chairman Andrew B. Murray 

Sidney S. Riggs W. Hampton Logan 

Ellison A. Williams 
COMMITTEE ON REPAIRS 
Sidney S. Riggs, Chairman Ottdf^. Wieters 

Henry H. Ficken Henry A. Molony 

COMMITTEE ON RETRENCHMENT 
AND REFORM 
Henry A. Molony, Chairman Melvin Furchgott 

A. Cramer Koster Isaac W. Hirsch 

COMMITTEE ON PERVEYANCE 
Otto F. Wieters, Chairman Ellison A. Williams 

A. Cramer Koster Henry A. Molony 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS 
W. Hampton Logan, Chairman Isaac W. Hirsch 

Robert H. Duryea Henry H. Ficken 

COMMITTEE ON CHAPEL 
A. Cramer Koster, Chairman Andrew B. Murray 

Robert H. Duryea Isaac W. Hirsch 

BINDING OUT COMMITTEE 
Ellison A. Williams, Chairman Henry H. Ficken 

Sidney S. Riggs W. Hampton Logan 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY 
Andrew B. Murray, Chairman Otto F. Welters 

Robert H. Duryea Mevlin Furchgott 



180 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

CHARLESTON ORPHAN HOUSE. 



Charleston, S. C, January 1, 1924. 

To the Mayor and Aldermen 

of the City of Charleston : 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to present herewith the 
statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the Charleston 
Orphan House for the year 1923, statement of the trans- 
actions of the Trustees of the Orphan House Funds and 
Estate; statement of the Receipts and Expenditures of the 
private Fund of the Commissioners; also the report of the 
various Standing Committees for the fiscal year ending 
December 31, 1923, together with my report as Chairman. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

WALTER PRINGLE, 

CJiairman Board of Commissioners 
of the Charleston Orphan House 



Statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the Charleston 
Orphan House for the Year ending December 31, 1923. 

RECEIPTS. 

To amount received from interest on Public 

Funds $ 10,605.23 

To amount received from interest on W. Jef- 
ferson Bennett Memorial Fund 2,000.00 

To amount received from Commissioners Trust 
Fund 4,067.78 

To amount received from estate of Dr. R. L. 
Brodie 1,400.00 

To amount received from City Council 37,995.74 

Street Paving 2,151.34 

$58,220.09 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcvieiv 181 

EXPENDITURES. 

By amount expended as per returns to City 

Council $ 50,552.31 

By amount Physician salaries 2,200.00 

By amount expended from Commissioners Trust 

Fund - 5,467.78 



$58,220.09 



EDWARD H. PINCKNEY, 

Treasurer B. C. C. 0. H. 



TRUSTEES ORPHAN HOUSE FUND AND ESTATE 
JANUARY 1, 1923, TO DECEMBER 31, 1923 

Receipts 

To balance Trustees $ 7,455.70 

W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund 14,818.26 

$ 22,273.96 

To Trutsees: 

12 months' interest on $211,500.00, City 4% 
Bonds July, 1923, and January, 1924. coupons 8,460.00 

18 months' interest on $28,500.00 City 4% 
Bonds, January, 1923; July, 1923, and Jan- 
uary, 1924, coupons 1,71000 

1 year's interest on deposit 435.23 

Interest on Liberty Bonds 1,530.00 

To W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund : 

1 year's interest on $98,000.00 City 4% 
Bonds $ 3,920.00 

1 year's interest on $10,000.00 4% Sewerage.... 400.00 

1 year's interest on $11,000.00 5% City 
of Columbia 550.00 

1 year's interest on deposit 810.31 

5,680.31 

$ 40,089.50 



Expenditures 

By Trustees: 

Paid over to City for Current Expenses $ 10,170.00 

Paid over to City for Current Expenses 435.23 

By W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund : 

Paid over to City for Current Expenses 2,000.00 

By balance Trustees $ 8,985.70 

By balance W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund 18,498.57— 27,484.27 

$ 40,089.50 



182 Mayor Grace's Annual Revieiv 



Assets 

Trustees Cash _ : _ 8,98570 

City of Charleston 4% Bonds 240,000.00 

Liberty Bonds...._ ^ _ 11,000.00 



W. J. Bennett Memorial Fund : 

Cash „- _ $ 18,498.57 

City of Charleston 4% Bonds _ 98,000.00 

City of Charleston 4% Sewerage 10,000.00 

City of Columbia 5% Bonds , 11,000.00 

Liberty Bonds _ 25,000.00 



$259,985.70 



162,498.57 



Respectfully Submitted, 



W. S. SMITH, 
City Treasurer. 



Examined and found corret: 
WALTER PRINGLE, 

Chairman Charleston Orphan House and Trustee 
Orphan Funds and Estate. 



W. J. BENNETT MEMORIAL FUND. DECEMBER 31, 1923. 

1905 Bond purchased , $ 2,000.00 

1906 Bond purchased „ 2,100.00 

1907 Bond purchased _ 2,200.00 

1908 Bond purchased _ _ 2,300.00 

1909 Bond purchased : _ 1,000.00 

191 1 Bond purchased 5,400.00 

1912 Bond purchased _ 1,500.00 

1913 Bond purchased 2,500.00 

1920 Bond purchased.... 25,000.00 

1923 Cash in Bank. 18,498.57 

$ 62,498.57 
Original Donation _ 100,000.00 

$162,498.57 

Cash inBank drawing 5% daily deposits. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

W. S. SMITH, 
City Treasurer. 

Examined and found corret: 
WALTER PRINGLE, 

Chairman Charleston Orphan House and Trustee 
Orphan Funds and Estate. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 183 

List of Stocks, Bonds and other Securities belonging to 
the Private Fund of the Commissioners of the Charleston 
Orphan House examined by Walter Pringle, Chairman, 
Edward H. Pinckney, Treasurer, W. Hampton Logan, 
Henry H. Ficken, Isaac W. Hirsch and Robert PL Duryea, 
and deposited in lock box at the Atlantic Savings Bank, 
this October 30th, 1923. 

?>^ City of Charleston 4% Bonds, each $1,000.. $38,000.00 

7 City of Charleston 4% Bonds, each $500-. 3,500.00 

3 City of Charleston 4^^^% Bonds, each $500 1,500.00 
2 City of Columbia 4>4% Bonds, each $1,000 2,000.00 

4 City of Florence 5% Bonds, each $1,000.... 4,000.00 
Property of the Francis J. Pelzer Memorial 

Fund — One (1) Registered Bond, 2nd 

Liberty Loan 4j4% Converted 5,000.00 

Property of the Adolph F. C. Cramer Memorial 
Scholarship Fund — One ( 1 ) Registered 
Bond, 4th Liberty Loan, 4^4% Converted 5,000.00 

Property of the Dr. William H. Huger Scholar- 
ship Fund — 5 City of Charleston 4% Bonds 
each $1,000 5,000.00 

Property of the Bennett Medal Memorial Fund 

One (1) City of Charleston 4% Bond 1,000.00 

1 Certificate for 5 shares Walker, Evans & 

Cogswell Co., Stock, par 500.00 

1 Certificate for 14 shares Bank of Charleston 

Stock, par 1,400.00 

1 Certificate for 20 shares Magnolia Cemetery 

Stock, par 2,000.00 

1 Deed for 6 lots in Magnolia Cemetery 

TRUST ESTATE OF DR. ROBERT L. BRODIE. ' 

In October 1923, the Hon. Joseph W. Barnwell, Trustee 
of the above estate, rendered a statement of its affairs to 
the Board of Commissioners, showing that he held at tha:t 
time investments as follows: 



184 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

In Bonds and Mortgages on Real Estate $99,715.00 

In Bonds of municipalities in South Carolina.... 38,000.00 
On Deposit in Banks 214.05 

The securities were examined and the accounts of the 
Trustee were approved by Walter Pringle, Chairman of 
the Board of Commissioners of the Charleston Orphan 
House and Geo. B. Buel, Chairman of the Board of Trustees 
of the Connie Maxwell Orphanage. There are living at 
this time four annuitants, who receive annually $4,000.00 
from the net income of the estate, the balance, under the 
terms of the will, is then paid each year, one-half to the 
Trustees of the Connie Maxwell Orphanage, and one-half 
to the Commissioners of the Charleston Orphan House. 
Upon the death of all tht annuitants the estate is to be 
divided between the two above named Orphanages. 

Abstract of Receipts and Expenditures of the Private 
Fund of the Commissioner of the Charlestson Orphan 
House, for the Year ending December 31st, 1923. 

RECEIPTS. 

To balance from last account $ 813.46 

To Interest on Securities 2,924.85 

Tc Income from Estate of Dr. R. L. Brodie 1,400.00 

Loaned by Mrs. Payne from Revolving Fund.... 336.69 



$5,475.00 
EXPENDITURES. 

By Paid salaries of Officers and Teachers $ 1,771.25 

" expenses of College Students 1,180.20 

" care of Lot Magnolia Cemetery 41.00 

'' bank box rent, Directory (City) and 

Newspapers 40.61 

" Otis Elevator Company, inspection of 

Elevator - 79. 59 

" Printing Annual Reports 68.00 

Repairs to Organ 10.00 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review . 185 

Floral Tributes 45.00 

Books, Music and Printing 144.85 

Supplies Etc 266.71 

Special Nursing 147.00 

Expenses Christmas Dinner 200.19 

Donations to Officers and Employees.. 678.00 

Glasses for Children 164.08 

Memorial Tablet 137.60 

Repairs 88.70 

For Anniversary 15.00 

Expenses Teachers Summer School.... 150,00 

Anesthetics 7.00 

Adding Machine 125.00 

Summer Outings 58.00 

Christmas Toys 50.00 



$5,467.78 
Balance in Bank 7.22 



$5,475.00 



Examined and found correct, 



W. H. LOGAN, Chairman HENRY H. FICKEN, 

ISAAC W. HIRSCH, ROBERT H. DURYEA, 

Committee on Accoimts. 

WALTER PRINGLE, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE SCHOOL 

The one hundred and thirty-third anniversary exercises 
commemorating the founding of the Charleston Orphan 
House were held on the 18th day of October 1923 in the 
Chapel on Vanderhorst Street. 

His Honor, Mayor Grace was present, as well as the 
Commissioners and many friends of the institution. 

Mr. Walter Pringle, Chairman of the Commissioners, 
presided. 



186 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcz 



lew 



The singing- and recitations of the children reflected great 
credit on the institution and showed the results of the care- 
ful and expert instruction given them by Miss Ella I. 
Hyams, their Musical Director. 

The record of school attendance at the Orphan House 
showed : — 

Highest number of pupils on the register during the 
year 1923 : 

Boys 114 

Girls 125 

Total 239 

Average attendance during the year : 

Boys 105 

Girls 112 

Total 217 

Admitted during the year : 

Boys 28 

Girls 23 

Total 51 

Discharged during the year : 

Boys 30 

Girls 29 

Total 59 

Ralph Millings entered the Charleston High School in 
September 1923. 

James Fletcher Mazyck left Clemson College in the Fall 
of 1923. 

BOYS' INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

The Boys' Industrial Department was operated most 
satisfactorily during the year. The department installed 
the one hundred and forty-six new desks and repaired 
more than four hundred chairs and stools during the year. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 187 

Two of the boys took lessons in cane wor]<: and are now 
qualified to look after work of this kind. They have re- 
caned a number of chairs, etc. 

GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
The Girls' Industrial Department, as usual, did a most 
creditable quantity of work and the neat and tidy appear- 
ance of the children showed the thoroughness and efficiency 
of this department. 

Its report shows that besides the mending of all stockings 
and garments, and the marking of all articles worn or used, 
there were made 676 dresses, 631 boys' shirt-waists, 124 
pairs rompers, 1,110 suits of underwear, 889 sheets and 
pillow cases, 996 table cloths, doilies and towels, overalls 27, 
bed ticks, 16,702 dresses and suits altered and repaired. 

The Laundry work which was done by four women, with 
the help of the girls, amounted to 1,175,231 pieces during 
the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY H. FICKEN, Chairman, 
ANDREW B. MURRAY, 
W. HAMPTON LOGAN, 
ELLISON A. WILLIAMS. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RETRENCHMENT 
AND REFORM. 
Your Committee has been mindful of the necessity to 
make what retrenchment are possible to meet any reduction 
in appropriations that the City may find necessary for the 
year 1924 and with this in view, are endeavoring to curtail 
expenses where possible, tho' there appears to be already 
rigid economy practiced in all departments. 
H. A. MOLONY, Chairman, MELVIN FURCHGOTT, 
A. CRAMER KOSTER, ISAAC W. HIRSCH. 



REPAIRS BY OUTSIDE LABOR. 

The following necessary and important repairs and 
improvements have been made during the past twelve 



188 Mayor Grace's Aiuiual Rcviezv 

months, under the supervision of Mr. Barton and Mr. 
Hoffman. 

Childrens' Dining Room and Officers' Dining- Room, dish 
washer room repaired and painted, school room and one 
class room, two office rooms and parlor repaired and 
painted, parlor furniture upholstered and varnished five 
bath rooms painted. Back gate made and put up, front gate 
reset, shed built between kitchen and milk pantry, three 
new doors in basement put up, flooring in three entries 
repaired. Stairs on west wing rebuilt, vallies on house, and 
copper roof in cupola, two gas ovens, flush tanks in boys' 
toilet, and two boiler furnaces repaired, ventilators cleaned 
and replaced. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Permanent improvements were made to the plumbing 
system as per plans and specifications of J. D. Newcomer, 
Architect, and the work was ably done by A. J. Riley. 
This consisted of the installation of lavatories, toilets and 
baths in four rooms and fixtures were taken out of eight 
rooms and reset in strict conformity with the city ordinances 
governing such work. 

REPAIRS BY INSIDE LABOR. 

Mr. Hoffman with the assistance from the boys. 

An enclosure made between bath house and main build- 
ing — 390 ft. of 5 ft. and 49 ft. of 10 ft. picket fence built 
and 8 gates made for same. 194 window lights, 18 sash 
cords put in, 865 ft. steam pipe renewed, 42 leaks stopped, 
27 toilets and 10 lavatories unstopped and foot troughs un- 
stopped 14 times, 16 window screens and six screen doors 
rebuilt, 110 electric cords, 39 electric irons repaired, 10 new 
locks put on, 21 doors and 35 locks repaired, 26 chairs and 
6 tables repaired, 1 safe repaired and painted, 64 shelves and 
2 wheelbarrows built, 4 wheelbarrows repaired, dish washer 
repaired and unstopped, 4 toilets taken up cleaned and reset, 
2 faucets put on drinking fountain, 2>6 ft. of drain pipe and 
2x2 sand pit dug and bricked for fountain. Play ground 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 189 

apparatus overhauled ; 9 repairs to the pump ; 1 to the en- 
gine ; and one to the small heater. 1 table and 1 desk cleaned 
and varnished, 1 blackboard put up. Steam pipes in bath 
house repaired and hand sink reset. 12 mattresses made 
and 1216 pairs of shoes were mended. Platform put up 
in chapel several times, pipe frames made for curtain and 
several minior things made which were necessary for the 
various school programs carried out during the year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

SIDNEY S. RIGGS, Chairman, 
HENRY H. FICKEN, 
OTTO F. WIETERS, 
HENRY A. MOLONY. 



REPORT OF PURVEYANCE COMMITTEE. 

The Committee on Purveyance begs to submit the follow- 
ing report for the year 1923 : 

Bread $ 2,454.86 

Books Etc 74.77 

Dry Goods, Shoes 8,131.70 

Drugs 408.34 

Fuel 3,173.12 

Groceries 5,102.12 

Insurance 411.05 

Lights 241.89 

Meat 1,151.97 

Milk 1,759.55 

Miscellaneous 689.73 

Petty Cash 1,500.00 

Repairs 3,493.65 

Salaries 20,223.02 

Physician's Salaries 2,200.00 

Paving 2,008.70 

Plumbing 4,504.61 

Architect's Fee 225.23 

TOTAL .„ $52,752.31 



The garden this year contributed the follov^ing vegetables 
to the food supply : 
134 dozen Squash. 
53^ Bushels Snap Beans. 
117 Dozen Ears of Corn. 
285 Bunches of Beets, 10 to the bunch. 



190 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

17 Bushels of Carrots. 
7^ Bushels of Onions. 
157 Dozen Tomatoes. 
74 Dozen Egg Plant. 
19^ Bushels Okra. 

Respectfully submitted, 
O. F. WIETERS, Chairman, ELLISON A. WILLIAMS 
HENRY A. MOLONY, A. CRAMER KOSTER. 



REPORT OF BINDING OUT COMMITTEE. 

The Binding Out Committee respectfully submits the 
following report of admissions to and discharges from the 
House during the year ending December 31, 1923. 

Boys admitted 27 ; Girls 23 ; Total 50. 

Boys discharged 28; Girls 28; Total 56. 
ELLISON A. WILLIAMS, Chairman, H. H. FICKEN, 
W. HAMPTON LOGAN, SIDNEY S. RIGGS. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY 

The Committee on Library begs leave to report that there 
are now in the Library 5,595 Volumes and 762 Pamphlets 
and Magazines. 

Since the last report there have been added to the Library 
22 Volumes, 141 Magazines and Illustrated Papers. 

The children drew from the Library regularly throughout 
the year, but in the summer vacation, devoted more time to 
reading under the supervision of the Librarian, the teachers 
and older girls assisting by reading suitable books to the 
younger children. 

One thousand seven hundred and eighty-one books have 
been drawn during the year. 

The Library is opened fifteen hours during the week for 
research work ; and during that time the higher grades have 
read 836 Magazines and Illustrated Papers, thus keeping 
in touch with the current events of the day. 
A. B. MURRAY, Chairman, R. H. DURYEA, 
OTTO F, WIETERS, MELVIN FURCHGOTT. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 191 

IN MEMORIAM. 
GEORGE WALTON WILLIAMS. 

MR. GEORGE W. WILLIAMS, the eighteenth in order 
of Chairman of the Commissioners of the Charleston 
Orphan House since its organization in 1790, after an 
illness of nearly four months in Philadelphia, Pa., where 
he had gone for medical treatment, died in that city on 
Friday, April 27th, 1923, in the sixty-fourth year of his 
age, having been born on January 20th, 1860, in Charleston. 
He was sincerely mourned by the citizens of Charleston, 
where all who knew him loved him, and by his many friends 
throughout South Carolina, and far beyond the borders 
of the State. 

MR. WILLIAMS was elected one of the Commissioners 
of the Orphan House on January 13th, 1903. On July 
30th, 1908, he was made Acting V^ice Chairman Pro Tem ; 
On January 14th, 1909 Vice-Chairman Pro Tem. On April 
6th, 1916, he was elected Chairman of the Board of Com- 
missioners and continued to fill that position with con- 
spicuous ability until the day of his death. Although MR. 
WILLIAMS was officially Chairman of the Board for 
only seven years he actually performed the duties of Chair- 
man for nearly fifteen years, or from the time of his being 
elected Acting Vice-Chairman Pro Tem. on July 30th, 1908; 
the other officers being prevented from attending to these 
duties because of ill-health. MR. WILLIAMS' service 
on the Board was for a continuous period of twenty years. 

WHEREAS, it has pleased Almighty God to remove 
from amongst us our highly esteemed and much beloved 
Chairman, MR. GEORGE W. WILLIAMS, be it Re- 
solved by the Board of Commissioners of the Charleston 
Orphan House: 

That, in the death of MR. WILLIAMS we have suffered 
the loss of a sincere friend, a man of sterling worth, a 
charming companion and a co-worker of the most earnest 
and devoted character. 



192 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 

That, the City of Charleston has lost a citizen of the high- 
est type, who served as Alderman for twelve years, from 
December 14th, 1891 through 1903, during the term of 
office of Mayor John F. Ficken and Mayor J. Adger Smyth, 
and has worked for Ikt interest at all times. He further 
served as one of the Trustees of the William Enston Home 
and on the Board of Park Commissioners. He was also 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Epworth Orphanage 
of Columbia, S. C. 

That, the Charleston Orphan House has lost an ideal 
officer. One who, of independent financial means, was 
able to give and did give almost his entire time and attention 
to the manifold duties devolving upon the Chairman of 
the Board of Commissioners, and by his thoughtfulness, 
foresight, good judgment and never-failing interest, the 
affairs of the Institution have been conducted successfully 
and happily, and numerous alterations, improvements and 
additions to the buildings, and betterment in the work, 
have been accomplished during the many years that he has 
served as Commissioner and as Chairman of The Board. 

That, the children of the Orphan House, the principal, 
superintendent, and teachers, and all others connected with 
the institution, have lost a loving and devoted friend and 
counselor, and one whose happy disposition, smiling counte- 
nance and kindly address will long be missed. 

That, these Resolutions be inserted in the Minute Book 
of the Board. 

That, a page in the Minute Book be inscribed to his 
memory. 

That, a copy of these Resolutions be sent to the widow 
and family of MR. WILLIAMS, with the assurance of 
the sympathy of the Commissioners in their bereavement. 

W. HAMPTON LOGAN, 
ROBERT H. DURYEA, 
A. CRAMER KOSTER. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 193 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHAPEL. 

During the year 1923, services were held regularly in 
the Orphan House Chapel on Sunday afternoons, with 
the exception of four Sundays. January 18th when the 
chiljdren attended the "Children's Serivce" held by Dr. R. 
N. Torry in the 2nd Presbyterian Church, — April 29th when 
the children attended 'the funeral of George W. Williams, 
Chairman of the Board of Commissioners, — Nov. 3rd when 
services was held in the Schoolroom on account of the in- 
clemency of the weather, — December 16 when the children 
attended the "Billy Sunday serivce" held in the Tabernacle. 

The Committee wishes to express thanks and appreciation 
to the following members of the Clergy and friends who 
so cheerfully responded to the requests to officiate at the 
services in the Chapel: 

Rev. A. M. Rich, Rev. J. E. Bailey, Rev. Harold Thomas 
(2), Rev. S. Cary Beckwith (2), Rev. J. Howard Worth 
(2), Rev. J. H. Danner (3), Rev. D. N. Bushbee (2), 
Chaplain E. W. Davis, U. S. N (2), Rev. F. E. Buddin (3), 
Rev. Geo. A. Nickels (2), Rev. Raymond Browning, Evan- 
gelist, Rev. Wallace Martin (2), Rev. J. W. Hickman (2), 
Rev. C. C. Coleman (2), Rev. H. D. Bull, Rev. Geo. L. 
Gongaware (2), Rev. Carl S. Smith, Rev. Homer W. Starr 
(2), Rev. Alexander Sifton (2), Mr. C. F. Nesbitt, Y. 
M. C. A., Rev. Alexander Sprunt (2), Mr. C. R. Boucher, 
Y. M. C. A., Mr. Bartow Harris, Rev. P. H. Anderson,' 
Rev. C. F. Wimberly, Mr. Lewis Buckley, Y. M. C. A., 
Rev. A. S. Thomas, Mr. J. P. Winningham, Rev. F. H. 
Shuler, Rev. I. E. Long, Mrs. Wm Asher, and Mr. J. D. 
Cappelmann. 

The services in the Chapel on the afternoon of Sunday, 
July 15, were of more than ordinary significance to all 
who hold a deep interest in the Charleston Orphan House 
in that they were conducted entirely by former Orphan 
House pupils. Mr. Bartow Harris, who was graduated 
from the Institution in 1916, preached the sermon. He 
is at the present time a ministerial student at Furman Uni- 
versity, Greenville, S. C. At the organ for the service was 



194 Mavor Grace's Annual Rcz 



lew 



Miss Jennk Oplan, who is also a former pupil of the 
Orphan House, she is at present studying piano at the 
Peabody Conservatory of Music at Baltimore. Added to 
this unique and gratifying incident was the fact that Mr. 
A. B. Murray, also a former pupil of the Charleston Orphan 
House, was the Commissioner of the week and as such was 
also connected with the sei'vice, making it one exclusively 
handled by former Charleston Orphan House pupils. 

On Easter Sunday an appropriate program of hymns and 
recitations was enjoyed by a large congregation. 

On December 23rd, the traditional Carol Service was 
given under the direction of Miss Ella I. Hyams, Mr. 
Arthur Speissegger assisting at the organ. 



A. CRAMER KOSTER, Chairman 
ANDREW B. MURRAY, ROBERT H. DURYEA, 
ISAAC W. HIRSCH. 



REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

As Chairman of the Board it becomes my duty to submit 
to you the foregoing financial statements and the reports 
of the Standing Committees of the Board of Commissioners 
of the Charleston Orphan House for the year 1923. 

On January 1, 1923, there w^ere in the House: 
Boys, 106; Girls, 115; Total 221. 

Admissions during the year : 
Boys, 27; Girls 23; Total 50. 

Withdrawals during the year: 
Boys 28; Girls 28; Total 56. 

Highest number on register during the year : 
Boys 119; Girls 127; Total 246. 

On December 31, 1923, there were in the House: 
Boys 105; Girls 110; Total 215. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 195 

The year ending December 31st, 1923 has shown a con- 
tinued forward step in all directions pertaining to the wel- 
fare and efficiency of the Institution. 

The health of the children has been good ; as in previous 
years, it is a matter of sincere thanksgiving that no deaths 
have occurred among them. 

During the month of January an epidemic of Influenza 
of a fairly mild type, enveloped the house, but by the un- 
tiring efforts of our own able corp of workers, the situation 
was kept under control. 

To Dr. T. Grange Simons, house Physician, whose un- 
tiring watchful care, and to Dr. R. Mclver Wilbur, Dental 
Specialist, and to Dr. Chas. W. Kolloch specializing on 
the eye, ear, nose and throat. The Board of Commissioners 
wish to extend their appreciation for their conscientious 
attention and the good results especially noticeable among 
the new children coming in during the year. 

Among the prominent visitors to the Institution was that 
of Rev. W. S. Sunday and party, who paid several visits 
during their celebrated campaign in our City. All of them 
were generous in their praise of the spirit of orderliness, 
intelligence and good health exhibited by the children. 

Sunday School, under its faithful Superintendent, Mr. 
C. O. Getty has continued regularly in its good work. 

The Department of Music, under the direction of Miss 
Ella I. Hyams deserves special mention. Those who heard 
the singing of the children's Christmas Carols on December 
21st, were enthusiastic in their praises. 

To the Rotary, Kiwanas, Elks and other clubs and in- 
dividuals, who have so kindly entertained the children dur- 
ing the year, the Commissioners, desire to express their 
grateful apprtciation. 

It is with deepest regret that we report that on the 27th, 
of April 1923, the Institution received a great loss in the 
death at Philadelphia, Pa., of their beloved Chairman of 
the Board, Mr. Geo. W. Williams. The remembrance of 
which continues to be deeply felt by those acquainted with 



196 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

the Institution and who are constantly mindful of his un- 
tiring eliorts in its behalf and continue to speak their ad- 
miration of his unselfish devotion and love for the children 
and all its inmates. 

Mr. Williams, left a generous legacy to the Orphan House 
Private Fund of $5,000.00, v^hich will come under official 
notice in the coming year. The Board of Commissiontrs 
adopted resolutions and a tribute of respect to Mr. Williams 
memory, which will be found elsewhere in this report. 

The Board also gratefully acknowledges receipt during 
the year of a very generous bequest of $5,000.00 to the 
Private Fund in the will of the late Miss Mary L. LeQueux, 
Principal whose death was recorded in our Year Book of 
1922. The Board desires also to acknowledge the bequest 
of one City of Charleston 4% $1,000.00 Bond, thru' Mr. 
A. B. Murray, from the Estate of the late Mrs. A. B. 
Murray, this to be known as the Bennett Memorial Medal 
Fund, interest on same to be appropriated each year to the 
purchase of the Bennett Medal, given annually to the school. 

The Board desires to take this opportunity to express its 
genuine gratification and to commend the able and untiring 
services and watchful care of the Principal of the house, 
Mrs. Elizabeth L. Payne, the successor to the late Principal, 
Miss Mary E. EeOueux. The competant and conscientious 
corps of teachers and matrons, the healthly and attractive 
appearance of the children, their efficient and orderly con- 
duct and the general progress that the children and the 
Institution has made, all demonstrate how ably Mrs. Payne 
has handled this difficult task. 

I feel it is a duty in this report to draw attention and pay 
a tribute, so justly due, to one who has for 47 years devoted 
his whole life to most efficient and loyal service in the in- 
terests of Charleston's childrtn as a conscientious, faithful, 
honest City employee, Mr. Ashley L. Barton, (age 73), 
should be placed prominently with all the others. For nearly 
half a century, Mr. Barton, now assisted by Mr. Hoffman, 
who is an able and earnest worker likewise, has taken care 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv ^197 

of the heavier duties and work of the Orphan House House- 
hold, day in and day out, Mr. Barton has seen to the com- 
forts of the children and inmates, warming their bodies 
and souls in the cold winters of almost half a century, min- 
istering to their other physical wants and with an untiring 
earnestness and simplicity that never wearied. I feel it a 
duty, as well as a pleasure to call your attention to this 
faithful employee, an honor to be a citizen of the City that 
produces such worthy characters. I am reversing the usual 
order of such matters and not waiting to give this just com- 
mendation when it could no longer reach him here. 

I am deeply indebted to the Board of Commissioners, that 
thru' their great assistance, thru' their sympathetic, earnest 
and intelligent judgment, the affairs of the Institution are 
working steadily forward and I feel that the one-hundred 
and thirty-third year ' in the history of The Charleston 
Orphan House, has shown advancement and continues to 
reflect great credit to our City. 

All of which I have the honor to submit, 
Respectfully, 

WALTER PRINGLE, 

Chairman of the Board of Commissioners, 
Charleston Orphan- House. 



198 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

CITY ORPHAN ASYLUM 



ACCOUNT OF MONEY RECEIVED FROM CITY TREASURER 

FOR CITY ORPHAN ASYLUM, FROM JANUARY 1st, 

DECEMBER 31st, 1923. 

RECEIPTS 

To received from City Treasurer, regular appropriation $ 9,000.00 

To additional appropriation for repairs 1,000.00 

$10,000.00 

EXPENDITURES 

By Paid for Bread $ 1,364.65 

Groceries 1,407.94 

Meat, Butter and Lard :. 1,302.27 

Dry Goods 670.95 

Drugs 155.40 

Fruit and Vegetables 386.58 

Ice 111.60 

Milk 204.41 

Coal and Wood 995.50 

Books and School Supplies 85.00 

Chicken food 154.90 

Stationery, Combs and T. Paper 22.39 

Electric Supply Co 173.12 

Paint and Varnish 44.27 

Printing 6.00 

China and Glass 10.30 

Gas and Electric Light 99.12 

Principal Matron 620.75 

News and Courier 9.44 

Hardware 110.23 

Plumbing and Repairing Roof 314.46 

Shoes and Clothing 341.63 

Repairs and Carpentering 1,087.80 

Furniture, Linoleum and Rugs 321.29 

$10,000.00 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcvievu 199 

WILLIAM ENSTON HOME 



The Honorable Mayor and Aldermen, 
Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen: 

Please find enclosed financial statements for the year 
1923, of the Trustees of The William Enston Home, and 
The WilHam Enston Home Annuitants' Fund. 

Respectfully, 

F. M. ROBERTSON, 

Secretary. 



THE WILLIAM ENSTON HOME. 

Cash Statement from January 1, 1923 to December 31, 1923. 

RECEIPTS : 

To Balance, Cash in Bank December 31, 1922 _.... $ 11,094.09 

To Interest for 1923 ♦ 9,217.74 

To Income— Surplus from Annuitants' Fund for 1923 8,149.40 

To Income— Rent of Small Farm 125.00 



$28,586.23 



DISBURSEMENTS : 

By Purchase $10,000 Camden. S. C, 5% Bonds @ $102.50 ..-$ 10,250.00 

By Current Expenses... 4,407.32 

By Fuel and Lights ._ 2,1 96.41 

By Balance— Cash in Bank 11,732.50 



$28,586.23 



ASSETS : 

5,000.00 Belton 5% Bonds costing $ 5,025.00 

54,000.00 Charleston 4% Bonds costing 50,836.52 

15,000.00 Charleston 5% Bonds costing 15,750.00 

5,000.00 Cerokee 4i^% Bonds costing 4,632.00 

20,000.00 Greenville - — 5% Bonds costing ._. 21,150.00 

8,000.00 Greer's 5% Bonds costing 8,000.00 

5,000.00 Columbia 41/2% Bonds costing 5,300.00 

20,000.00 Columbia 5% Bonds costing.... 21,640.00 

5,000.00 Manning 51/2% Bonds costing 5,287.50 

5,000.00 Florence 5% Bonds costing 5,250.00 

5,000.00 Anderson 5% Bonds costing.. 5,350.00 

10,000.00 U. S. 2nd Liberty 4%% Bonds costing 10.000.00 

10,000.00 U. S. 3rd Liberty 414% Bonds costing 9,740.00 

10,000.00 Camden 5% Bonds costing 10.250.00 

6,000.00 Neberry 5% Bonds costing 6,120.00 

8,000.00 Rock Hill 6% Bonds costing 8,045.00 

5,000.00 Hartsville 6% Bonds costing 5,125.00 

11,732.50 Cash in Bank 11,732.50 



$207,732.50 $209,233.52 

E. E. Charleston, S, C, December 31, 1923. 



ARTHUR LYNAH, 



President. 



200 Mayor Grace's Annual Rnnew 

WM. ENSTON ANNUITANTS' FUND.— STATEMENT No. 41. 

Cash Tranactions of John F. Ficken, R. G. Rhett and W. E. Butler, Trustees. 
From January 1. 1923 to December 31, 1923. 

RECEIPTS : 

January 1, 1923, Cash balance in bank „ $ 367.87 

January 6, 1923, U. S. War Savings Stamps Redeemed 131.84 

Jan. 6, 1923, Interest War Saving Stamps _ _ $ 28,16 

Jan. Interest S. C. Refunding 4% Bonds Net 480.00 

Jan. and July Int. Charleston: 4% Bonds Net 3,060.00 

Jan. and July Int. Wilmington- 4% Bonds Not 880.00 

Jan. and July Int. Greenwood- - _.6% Bonds Net 360.00 

Jan. and July Int. Greenboro 4% Bonds Net 600.00 

Jan. and July Int. Montgomery A'^A% Bonds Net..... 720.00 

February Interst Lancaster- _ „ --4% Bonds Net 360.00 

March and Sept. Int. Union ._. 6% Bonds Net _ 1,200.00 

March and Sept. Int. U. S. Liberty 3d A\i% Bonds Net 212.50 

April and October Int. Aiken _ -41^% Bodns Net 495.00 

March and October Int. Charleston -4% Bonds Net— 20.00 

April and October Int. Gaffney 5% Bonds Net 500.00 

June and December Int. Dillon 5% Bonds Net 100.00 

July Interest, Greenville — — -4%% Bonds Net ... 360.00 

Dec. 1921 Interest Chesterfield 6% Bonds Ne6 900.00 10,275.66 



$10,775.37 

DISBURSEMENTS : 

Annuities for 1923 ....$ 1,425.00 

Expenses of Administration 200.00 $ 1,625.00 



Surplus paid Trustee Wm. Enston Home 8,149.40 

Trustees' Commission on Receipts $10,257.66 

Trustees' Commission on Annuities 1,625.00 

(Including Expenses Paid) 
Trustees' Commission on Surplus Paid Trustees 

Wm. Enston Home 8,149.40 



$20,005.96 @ 21^% 501.26 

Balance Cash in Bank— .-..'- „. ! 499.71 



$10,775.37 



ASSETS: 

% 5,000.00 U. S. 3rd Liberty 4%% Bonds costing $ 5,000.00 

11,000.00 Aiken. S. C 41/2% Bonds costing 10,991.50 

77,000.00 Charleston, S. C 4% Bonds costing... 55.661.18 

15.000.00 Chesterfield, S. C .6% Bonds costing.. 17,054.04 

2,000.00 Dillon, S. C. .— 5% Bonds costing.. 2,031.94 

10.000.00 Gaffney. S. C 5% Bonds costing... 10,383.94 

15,000.00 Grensboro, N. C ....4% Bonds costing 13,752.78 

8,000.00 Greenville, S. C, Road ......41/2% Bonds costing 7,849.00 

6,000.00 Greenwood, S. C ...6% Bonds costing. 6.565.65 

9,000.00 Lancaster. S. C .4% Bonds costing. 8.865.00 

16.0015.00 Montgomery. Ala. 4%% Bonds costing 16,640.00 

12,000.00 S. C. Refunding 4% Bonds costing 12,000.00 

20.000.00 Union, S. C 6% Bonds costing. 20,315.00 

22,000.00 Wilmington, N. C 4% Bonds costing — 22,235.90 

499.71 Cash in Bank 499.71 



$228,499.71 $209,845.64 



E. E. Charleston. S. C, December 31, 1923. 



JNO. F. FICKEN, 
R. G. RHETT, 
W, E. BUTLER. 



Trustees. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 201 

CHARLESTON HOME 



Charleston, S. C, January 1st, 1924. 

To his Honor the Mayor and Aldermen 
of the City of Charleston. 

I have the honor to present herewith the Annual Report 
of the Charleston Home for the year 1923. 

Respectfully, 

J. F. O'ROURKE, 

Chairman. 



Mr. J. F. O'Rourke, Chairman and Commissioners 
of the Charleston Home. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to present herewith my annual report 
for the Charleston Home for the year 1923. 

December 31st, 1922 — Number of inmates in the Home, 45. 

Admitted, 1923 — Males, 10; Females, 5. Discharged — Males, 10; 
Females, 10. Deaths — Males, 5; Females, 3. 

In Home, December 31st, 1923 — Males, 16; Females, 9. At Hospital 
— Males, 4 Females, 3; total, 32. 

Outdoor Pensioners. 

Number drawing rations, 4,288; number of rations issued, 2941; 
average number drawing weekly, 82 ; average number issued weekly, 56 ; 
amount expended for rations, $648.01 ; average cost per ration for 
1922, 18%c ; average cost per ration for 1923, 22c. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Bread $ 455.85 

Coal - 716.50 

Men*s Clothes 347.60 

Drugs - 86.12 

Dry Goods 503.91 

Fruit, Vegetables _ 195.30 

Fish, Poultry 48.30 

Groceries _ 2,573.98 

Grist, Home .- 68.45 

House Furnishings 296.42 

Hats and Shoes „_ 187.50 



202 Mayor Grace's Ajiinial Review 

Insurance, 3 years _ 223.20 

Ice - 89.10 

Laundry _ 141.97 

Light and Gas 361.84 

Meats _ 797.95 

Milk 173.11 

Miscellaneous 6.00 

Newspapers and Printing 29.00 

Repairs _ 1,28.58 

Wood 139.25 

$ 8,569.93 

Sundry Supplies 1,275.00 

Salaries, officers -- 2,300.00 

Salary, fireman 125.00 

3,700.00 

Outdoor Pensioners _ 648.01 

: 648.01 

$12,917.94 

Appropriation $13,000.00 

Expenditures 12,917.94 

Balance $ 82.06 

Another year has passed and our accomplishments are 
very gratifying. Your help and co-operation were of great 
benefit to us in making many improvements. 

The residences of the Superintendent and Clerk were 
renovated and repaired, the office modernly equiped includ- 
ing a telephone booth. All necessary repairs to building 
and appurtenances caused by natural decay were done and 
everything put in first class condition. 

Several improvements are contemplated for this year 
amongst them, the renovating of the interior of the build- 
ing and the installation of a fire-proof vault for our histori- 
cal records. 

The health of the inmates has been excellent due to 
perfect sanitary conditions and the faithful and competent 
services of the attending physician Dr. Frank Heidt. 

More than ninety divine services and entertainments 
were held and over eighteen hundred visitors were shown 
through the Home. We now have a very comfortable Home 
with all modern improvements. 

Thanking you for your confidence and help. 

Respectfully, 
W. H. PIEPER. 

Superintendent 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 203 

ROPER HOSPITAL 
ANNUAL REPORT 1923 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 

G. McF. Mood, M. D., Chairman. 
C. W. KOLLOCK, M. D. 

J. S. Rhame:, M. D. 
L. A. Wilson, M. D. 
W. A. Smith, M. D. 
F. O. Bates, Secretary 

MEDICAL STAFF 

Robert Wilson, Jr., M. D „ Physician in Charge 

Edward Rutledge, M. D., Clin. Prof, of Medicine -.Physician 

J. A. Ball, M. D., Clin. Prof, of Dermatology and Medicine, 

.„ „ Dermatologist 

R. M. Pollitzer, M. D., Prof. Pediatrics Pediatrician 

E. L. Jager, M. D., Asso. Prof, of Medicine and Neurology 

Neurologist 

J. A. Finger, M. D., Lecturer on Medicine Physician 

J. H. Cannon, M. D., Lecturer on Medicine Physician 

J. J. LaRoche, M. D., Lecturer on Medicine Physician 

O. B. Chamberlain, M. D., Lecturer on Medicine Physician 

SURGICAL STAFF 

R. S. Cathcart, M. D., Prof, of Abdominal Surgery 

Surgeon in Charge 

E. F. Parker, M. D., Prof, of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Ophthalmologist and Otologist 

A. J. Buist, M. D., Prof, of Gynecology Gynecolagist 

C. P. Aimar, M. D., Prof, of General Surgery Surgeon 

C. W. Kollock, M. D., Prof, of Rhinology and Laryngology 

Rhinologist and Laryngologist 

A. E. Baker, M. D., Clinical Prof, of Gynecology and Abdominal 

Surgery — Surgeon 

W. H. Johnson, M. D., Prof of Orthopedics Orthopedist 

E. C. Baynard, M. D., Prof, of Urology Urologist 

G. F. Wilson, M. D., Prof, of Obstetrics Obstetrician 

D. L- Maguire, M. D., Asst. Prof, of Surgery Surgeon 

J. S. Rhame, M. D., Asst. Prof, of Surgery Surgeon 

L. A. Wilson, M. D., Asst. Prof, of Obstetrics Obstetrician 

R. B. Gantt, M. D., Lecturer on Urology ^ „ Urologist 

J. J. Ravenel, M. D., Lecturer on Urology Urologist 



204 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcvieiu 

LABORATORY STAFF 

G. McF. Mood, M. D., Prof, of Bacteriology and Hygiene 

V Bacteriologist 

A. R. Taft, M. D., Prof, of Physical Therapy and Roentgenology 

Roentgenologist 

F. PI. Dietrich, Prof, of Pathology Pathologist 

F. B. Johnson, M. D., Prof, of Clinical Pathology.-Clinical Pathologist 
H. H. Plowden, M. D., Asst. Prof, of Pathology Pathologist 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

E. L. Jager, M. D., Asso. Prof, of Medicine and Neurology 

Chief of Clinic 

R. B. Gantt, M. D., Lecturer on Urolog>' Asst. Chief of Clinic 

MEDICINE 

J. A. Finger, M. D Lecturer on Medicine 

W. A. Smith, M. D Lecturer on Medicine 

O. B. Chamberlain Lecturer on Medicine 

J. H. Cannon Leecturer on Medicine 

SURGERY 

M. K. Mazyck, M. D Lecturer on Surgery 

F. G. Cain, M. D., Lecturer on Surgery 

T. E. Bowers, M. D Assistant in Surgery 

OPHTHALMOLOGY, OTOLOGY AND LARYNGOLOGY 

E. F. Parker, M. D Prof, of Ophthalmology and Otology 

C. W. Kollock, M. D Prof, of Rhinology and Laryngology 

J. F. Townsend, M. D Asst. Prof, of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. E. Smith, M. D Lecturer on Rhinology and Lar>ngology 

OBSTETRICS 

R. L- McCrady, \i. D..^ Lecturer in Obstetrics 

H. K. Jenkins, M. D Lecturer in Obstetrics 

R. W. Preston, M. D „ Assistant in Obstetrics 

GYNECOLOGY 

R. L. McCrady, M. D Lecturer on Gynecology 

C. A. Speissegger, Jr., M. D Assistant in Gynecology 

ROENTGENOLOGY 
A. R. Taft, M. D Prof, of Physical Therapy and Roentgenology 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 205 

PEDIATRICS. 

M. W. Beach, M. D IvCCturer on Pediatrics 

W. M. Rliett, M. D Lecturer on Pediatrics 

G. F. Heidt, M. D Instructor in Pediatrics 

A. E. Baker, Jr. M. D Assistant in Pediatrics 

DERMATOLOGY. 

J. H. Cannon Lecturer on Dermatology 

UROLOGY. 

R. G. Gantt, M. D '. Lecturer in Urology 

J. J. Ravenel, M. D Lecturer in Urology 

W. L- A. Wellbrock, M. D Instructor in Urology 

LABORATORY. 

F. B. Johnson, M. D Prof, of Clinical Pathology 

W. L- A. Wellbrock, M. D Lecturer on Clinical Pathology 

DENTISTRY 

L. W. Bonoitt, D.D.S. Buist Kerrison, D.D.S. 

W. S. Brown, D.D.S. E. Kerrison, D.D.S. 

C. B. Colson, M.D., D.D.S N. S. Lea, D.D.S. 

L. P. Dotterer, D.D.S. Cassie Patrick, D.D.S. 

Thomas Dotterer, D.D.S. E. Y. Smith, D.D.S. 

L. E. Knobelock, D.D.S. J. S. Smith, D.D.S. 

E. M. Gaffney, D.D.S. R. A. Smith, D.D.S. 

J. E. Harper, D.D.S. R. McI. Wilbur, D.D.S. 



OFFICERS OF THE ROPER HOSPITAL 

Superintendent. 
Mr. F. O. Bates. 

Robert Wilson, Jr., M. D., Physician in Chief. 
Robert Spann Cathcart M. D., Surgeon in Chief. 

Resident Physicians 

Roderick S. Macdonald James A. Sasser 

Robert L. Crawford Claude K. Lindler 

William P. Rhett E. Gordon Able 

Corran P. Youmans Charles M. Moore 

Robert D. Hill Joe W. Potts 

John H. Boulware Lawrence P. Thackston 

Directress of the Training School 
Miss Anna W. Lauman 

Instructress 
Miss Martha Erdmann 

Supervisor of the Wards 
Miss Ottillie Montag 



206 



Mayor Grace's AuJiual Rcvieiv 



Roper Opcr. Room Supervisor 

Miss Margaret Andell 

Roper Night Supervisor 

Miss Clara Weinberg: 

Riverside Anaesthetist 

Aliss R. Myers 

Dietician 

Miss Sarah E. Hughes 

Cashier Riverside 

Miss Lillian Legare 

Stevi'ardess 

Miss M. A. Colcock 

Asst. SteiL'ardess 

Mrs. S. Stephens 

Apothecary 
W. Q. Seymour 



Riverside Oper. Room Supervisor 

Miss Lena Padgett 

Roper Supervisor of Clinic 

Miss Laura Browne 

Riverside Floor Supervisor 

Miss M. Koester 

Engineer 

Wm. P. Walsh 

Bookkeeper 

Miss Joe C. Steiber 

Stenographer 

Miss E. Kirkland 

Historian 

Miss Mamie Verdier 

Statistican and Investigator 

Miss Sarah C. Kollock 



ANNUAL REPORT CHAIRMAN 
COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF 



To the President and Members of 

the Medical Society of South Carolina, 
Charleston, S. C. 
Gentlemen : — 

We beg to hand you herewith a copy of the Annual 
Report of Roper Hospital for the year 1923. 

The report of the Superintendent, and that of the Auditor 
are so complete, that this letter will merely call attention 
to a few outstanding features. 

Reference to the Superintendent's report, will show^ that 
there w^ere treated in the institution during 1923, 273 more 
cases than were treated during the provious year, and that 
this number increased the patients days to the number of 
6,671. As it costs the Hospital S2.21 a day for each patient's 
case, the above number of days increased the cost of con- 
ducting the institution, S 14,742.91. 

In spite of this considerable increase in patient days, 
reference to the Auditors Financial Statement, will show- 
that the institution was conducted with actual expenses 
over income of only $9,396.57. 



I 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 207 

It is of interest to again note, that the hospital has had 
to defray a considerable proportion of the actual cost of 
city patients. The net profits obtained from Riverside 
and Roper Hospital pay patients, was $18,667.50. All of 
this was used for the care of the City's Charity Cases, to- 
gether with $9,396.57, the amount of the years deficit. 

Could the hospital obtain from the city an appropriation 
sufficient to cover the actual cost of care of these charity 
cases, the hospital would have each year, an amount vary- 
ing from $28,000.00 to $39,000.00 which it could use for 
proporty upkeep and improvement, which your board re- 
cognized as being of tremendous importance. Just now 
your nursing staff is quite improperly and inadequately 
housed, and this is an outstanding problem, which could 
be definitely and satisfactorily solved in two or three years, 
could all city patients be placed upon a cost basis. Your 
board has been working with City Council for some years, 
trying to make them see the hopeless position in which the 
hospital is placed by its being placed upon any basis other 
than a cost basis, and while we are still upon a flat appro- 
priation, we believe that next year will see the hospital 
placed upon a cost basis. 

The Superintendent has made a number of recommenda- 
tion which your board would have liked to carry out in toto, 
but for the lack of funds have been able to do only in part. 
You have all noticed the improvements in the various bath 
rooms, and surgeons scrub up room. The board hopes to 
make all the remaining bath rooms equally presentable with- 
in a short time. 

One improvement of great educational importance, is the 
approximately completed autopsy room. We are very proud 
of this department, and hope that all members of the society 
will make good use of it in the study of cases which have 
gone to autopsy. 

Respectfully, 

G. McF. MOOD, M. D. 
For the Board of Commissioners of Roper Hospital 



208 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT FOR 

1923. 



Charleston, S. C, January 1, 1924. 

The Board of Commissioners, 
Roper Hospital, 

Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen: — 

I herewith present the nineteenth Annual Report of the 
Roper Hospital for the fiscal year ending December 31st, 
1923. 

As you will notice from the comparative table below the 
demand for Hospital care by the citizens of the community 
continues to increase. We treated during the year 273 more 
patients and furnished 6,671 more day's treatment than for 
the year 1922. 

You will notice from the Expense Report for the year, 
that our expenses for 1923 exceeded those for 1922 to the 
amount of $14,117.10, but this increase is more than ac- 
counted for by the increase of day's treatment furnished 
over the previous year, 6,671 days at the per diem cost of 
$2.21 would amount to $14,742.91. This clearly shows 
that the expense for the past year was practically tlie same 
as that for 1922 if no more patients had been cared for than 
the previous year. 

Below you will find a comparative statement showing 
the number of patients treated during the past seven years : 

Free Pay Free Pay Total 

Year Paients Patients Total Days Days Days 

1917 1,600 1,206 2,805 30,765 16,034 46,790 

1918 1,462 1,912 3,374 25,127 28,975 54,102 

1919 1,644 1,813 3,457 27,221 24,195 51,416 

1920 -2,527 1,672 4,199 31,778 27,132 58,910 

1921 2,814 1,736 4,550 45,383 17,439 62,822 

1922 2,644 1,600 4,244 47,158 15,555 62,713 

1923 3,017 1,500 4,517 51,814 17,570 69,384 

The following table will show the per diem cost of the 
care of patients at Roper and Riverside separately, the 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 209 

average per diem receipts from Roper and Riverside, also 
showing the per diem gain or loss in each case. 

Cost Receipts Receipts Loss per Cost Receipts 

per day per day per day day on per day per day 

Year Roper Ward Roper Pay from City Riverside Riverside 

Patients Patierits City Patients Dept. Dept. 

1918 $1,957 $2.26 $1.31 $0,647 $3,257 $5,219 

1919 2.512 3.25 1.10 1.412 3.513 5.404 

1920 2.953 3.2097 1.6368 1.3162 4.009 5.185 

1921 2.23 . 4.03 1.507 0.723 4.78 5.87 

1922 2.17 3.35 1.1974 0.9726 5.32 6.29 

1923 2.21 3.20 1.56 0.65 5.01 5.39 

The loss on Cit}^ patients for the past four years has 
been: 1920— $39,856.65 ; 1921— $39,821.07; 1922— 
$37, 996.40; and 1923— $28,064.07. 

From the above statement it will be seen that it is very- 
essential that the Hospital ask for a larger appropriation 
from the City of Charleston than was asked for the previous 
year. The Hospital certainly cannot operate successfully 
and care for the increasing demands made upon it from 
year to year unless its income is going to be proportionately 
increased. 

The Hospital plant is growing older each year and the 
depreciation increases, making it necessary that a larger 
amount be spent in keeping the equipment and buildings 
up to the standard. 

During the year the bath room on the White Surgical 
and Medical Departments have been tiled, new tubs and 
showers installed. This has filled a long standing need 
of the Hospital. 

The demands upon the Hospital in all Departments, at 
times are so great that we are forced to place patients 
seeking admission on a waiting list until a bed is vacated. 

I would again urgently recomemnd that the following 
repairs and improvements be made during the year, 1924: 

1st. The building of an additional wing to the Hospital, 
four stories in height including the basement floor to care 
for ; basement floor, larger dining room space, larger kitchen 
and store rooms and laundry; second floor. Tubercular 
patients; third floor, Gynecological and Orthopedic cases; 



210 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 

fourth floor, additional space for Contagious diseases, if 
provided for would relieve the congested condition of the 
other departments. 

2nd. Relaying floors of Halls of Colored Surgical and 
Medical Departments, White Medical Hallway and Day 
Room. 

3rd. Resurfacing, varnishing and polishing of all floors 
of the General Ward. 

4th. The Tiling of all Bath rooms an installing new bath 
tubs and showers in the Colored Departments. 

5th. The purchase and installation of five bed pan 
sterilizers, one on each ward. 

6th. The enlarging of the dining room for colored 
employees. 

7th. The purchase of 100 new mattresses. 

8th. The purchase of 3'^ ball bearing castors for all 
beds in the Hospital. 

9th. The purchase and installation of a new flat work 
ironer for the laundry. 

10th. The painting of the entire exterior of all buildings. 

11th. The installation of lavatories and running water 
in each of the Clinic rooms. The tearing out and relaying 
of the floor in the Medical Clinic Rooms and painting of 
all Clinic roofs in the Out-Patient Department. 

12th. The building of a new Nurses Home to care for 
100 nurses. Our present Nurses Home will only care for 
comfortably fifty nureses, which is far too few nurses to 
properly staff the Hospital. This is an urgent need and 
something should be done at once to relieve the congested 
condition in the Home. 

13th. The purchase of a new chasis to replace the Dodge 
chasis now in use, which will have been in use for six years 
on the 1st of October of this year, and is no longer fit for 
service. 

14th. The building and equiping of a suitable Morgue 
for keeping bodies until called for by relatives and the 
forming of autopsies. Our present facilities are antiquated 
and no longer used by first class Hospitals. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 211 

15th. The purchase and installation of new kitchen 
equipment as follows : 3 steam jacketed kettles, 1 triple 
coffee urn, 1 new coal range, (one in use at present has 
been used for twenty years and has out-lived usefulness), 
1 dish washer and serving table. 

16th. The purchase of 100 chairs of tubular steel, white 
enamel type for use of the patients. Some of our Wards 
having only a few chairs in them. 

The Woman's Auxiliary have continued their splendid 
work through the past year. They have supplied additional 
equipment for the Children's Ward as well as a great many 
articles of linen, etc., for general use in the Hospital. Their 
Sunshine Committees have visited the Hospital weekly, dis- 
tributing delicacies and reading matter to the Patients which 
has been a great comfort to them. 

Committees from churches all denominations are showing 
an interest in the Hospital by visiting at regular intervals, 
distributing fruit, ice cream and reading matter to the pa- 
tients. There has been Committees of ladies from several 
of the fraternal orders of the city, I would especially 
mention those from the Pythian Sisters and the Order of 
the Eastern Star who have visited the Hospital several 
times during the year also distributing delicacies and read- 
ing matter to the patients. 

Much has been accomplished in the past year in improve- 
ment of the Hospital and equipment. This, however, has 
been limited because of a lack of funds, a great many 
other things in the way of permament improvements could 
and should have been done, as you will see from the above 
recommendations, but were impossible because of the limit- 
ed funds of the Hospital. 

Attached hereto you will find the annual statistical and 
financial reports, as well as an itemized budget for the year 
1924. 

The reports from the various departments as well as the 
Auditor's report is attached. 

I wish to express my appreciation of the continued sup- 
port of the Board of Commissioners, the excellent services 



212 Mayor Grace's Annual Rev 



leiv 



and cooperation rendered by the Heads of all Departments, 
my assistants and employees, without which the results 
obtained would have been impossible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. O. BATES, 

Superintendent. 



ROPER HOSPITAL. 

Superinte:ndent's Annual Repoiit. 

Statistical Report for 1923. 

PATIENTS REMAINNIG AND ADMITTED— HOPER 
HOSPITAL AND RIVERSIDE DEPARTMENT. 

A^ umber of Patients Admitted. 

Patients remaining in Hospital January 1, 1923 174 

Patients admitted to Roper _ 3,577 

Patients admitted to Riverside 766 



4,517 



Number of Patients Treated. 

White males treated, Roper _ 940 

White females treated, Roper 671 

Colored males treated, Roper _ 1,055 

Colored females treated, Roper _ _ 1,068 

White males treated, Riverside 309 

White females treated. Riverside 474 



Number of Free and Day Patients Treated. 

Free patients treated. Roper 3,017 

Pay patients treated. Roper 717 



4,517 



3.734 



Pay patients treated. Riverside ~ 783 4,517 

Percentages Patients Treated. 



Free patients — - 66.78% 

Pay patients _.... 33.22% 



Days Treatment. 

Days — Free treatment. Roper 51,814 

Days— Pay treatment _ 9,592 

Days — Pay treatment. Riverside 7,978 



100% 



69.384 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 213 



Percentages — Free and Pay Days. 



Free days, Roper _ 74.68% 

Pay days, Roper 13.83% 

Pay days, Riverside _ _ 11.49% 



Patients Treated Free. 

City _ - 2,570 

County 447 



Percentages Free Patients Treated. 



City 

County — 



City .... 
County 



100% 



3,017 



Days Treatment, Free Patients. 



85.13% 
14.82% 


100% 
51.814 


. 43,218 
8,596 



Percentages Days Treatment, Free Patients. 

City 85.18% 

County - „ 16.60% 



700% 



Average Days in Hospital, Free and Pay 

Free Roper, City 16.82% 

Free, Roper, County 19.23% 

Pay, Roper 13.38% 

Pay, Riverside _ 10.19% 

Comparison Patients Treated for the Past Seven Years — in 
the Hospital 

Free Pay Free Pay 

Year. Patients. Patients. Total. Days. Days. Total. 

1917 1600 1205 2805 30,765 16,034 46.796 

1918 _ 1462 1912 3374 25,127 28,975 54,102 

1919 1644 1813 3457 27,221 24,195 51,416 

1920 2527 1672 4199 31,778 27,132 58.910 

1921 2814 .1736 4550 45,383 17,439 62,822 

1922 „. 2644 1600 4244 47,158 15,555 62,713 

1923 3017 1500 4517 51,814 17,570 69,384 

Deaths: 

1923. 1922. 1921. 

Roper _ 389 354 

Riverside _ _ -.... 26 21 

— —1 

Total _. 415 375 344 

Mortality Rates: 

Roper _ 10.41-100 10.13-100 8.15-100 

Riverside .-..- 3.32-100 2.79-100 3.87-100 



214 Mayor Grace's Annual Revictv 



Births : 
Roper .... 
Riversde 



Total _ 281 161 143 

Operations : 

Roper 

Riverside , 

Salvarsaus : 

Roper 

Riverside 

Cystoscopic Examinations : 

Roper 

Riverside 



248 
33 


145 
16 


281 


161 


1,052 

352 


966 
379 


735 
5 


303 
16 


177 
111 


162 
103 


248 
33 


145 
16 



Deliveries : 

fioper _ 

Riverside _ 

Total Operations 2,994 2,090 1,956 

Prescriptions — Drug Store : 

Externes— Pay 16,414 14,366 

Extemes — Free 662 735 

Internes— Pay 626 482 

Internes— Free 399 513 

Narcotics - 1,993 1,552 

20,094 17,648 13,860 

^_ • OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

Bxternes Department: 

Number of House Visits 8,435 7,307 

Numer of New Cases - 6,406 5,309 — 

Number of Office Visits 10 

Total Treated 14,839 12,626 7,439 

Daily Average New Patients and House Visits : 

Daily average new patients 17.55-100 14.52-100 8.14-100 

Daily average old visits 23.10-100 20.01-100 12.20-100 

Emergency Departments 

1923. 1922. 1921. 

Number of white patients treated.... 511 494 

Number of colored patients treated 929 898 



Total cases treated 1,440 1,392 

Daily average cases treated 3.95-100 3.814-100 3.752-100 

Free Clinic, 3 to S P. M.: 

Number of new cases treated 8,522 8,321 7,203 

Number of old cases treated 19,152 16,457 12,335 

Total number of visits 27,674 24,778 19,438 



Mayor Gracc^s Annual Review 215 

Daily average new cases 32.65-100 32.01-100 24.45-100 

Daily average old cases 73.37-100 63.25-100 39.85-100 

Daily average new and old cases.... 106.03-100 95.26-100 63.30-100 

Total Visits for the Year Daily : 
Free Clinic, Emergency and Externe 

Departments 43,953 38,796 20,797 

Total number of cases treated Out- 
Door Department for County of 
Charleston „ 1,041 804 515 

Charged County of Charleston with 

1,041 treatment at $1.00 $1,041.00 ...... — 



STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

FOR THE YEAR 1923. 

RECEIPTS. 

Accounts Receivable : 

Roper _ $26,927.50 

Riverside 45, 188.00 

^$ 72,115.50 

Appropriations : 

City of Charleston _. $99,610.89 

County of Charleston 25,000.00 

^$124,610.89 

Sales : 



Drugs - _ 2,662.27 

Sundries 1,111.29 



3,773.56 



Salaries, Linen Department 180.00 

Ambulance Expense 25.00 

Food Supplies 60.94 

Interest Sinking Fund Insurance 46.56 

Refund and bad accounts 221.50 

General - 522. 13 



201,556.07 



Less : 

Expenditures : Unpaid bills January 1, 1923 17,673.34 

Disbursements for year 1923 : 

Salaries and Wages _ 56,753.92 

Food Supplies 59,529.97 

Drugs and Alcohol 10,897.17 

Ambulance Expenses 1,630.41 

Hospital Supplies 25,330.20 

General Expenses _ 33,182.36 

187,324.03 



Refunds : 

Roper -_ __ $1,911.26 

Riverside 2,349.95 

4,261.21 

Transferred to Insurance Sinking Fund 1,200.00 



5,461.21 



Total Expenditures for the Year 1923 210,458.58 



216 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Disbursments over receipts or unpaid bills, 

January 1, 1924 _._ 8.902.52 

Total Expense for Year 1923, Roper and 

Riverside 187,324.03 

Less : 

Riverside Expenses 39,949.10 

,^. Outpatient Departmeent Expenses: 

^fc Salaries, Doctors, Superintendent, Etc. 

^. Orderlies _ $6,618.00 

■ V, 50% Drugs — - 5,471.84 

1% Expenses _ 2,400.00 

14,489.84 

54,438.94 



Net Operating Expenses Roper Hospital 

proper _ $132,885.09 

Cost per Hospital Day, Roper 2.21 

Cost per Hosptal Day, Riverside 5.01 

Received per Hospital Day, Roper Pay Patients 3.20 

Received per Hospital Day, Riverside 5.39 

Received per Hospital City Patients 1.56 

Eoss per Hospital Day, Roper City Patients .65 

Total Cost of City Patients, 43,218 days, 
at $2.21 __ 95,511.78 

City Appropriation _ 81,937.55 

Eess Cost of Cinics ™ _ 14,489.84 



Amount City Appropriation Available for Hos- 
pital Patients 67,447.71 

Actual Loss to Hospital for Care of City 

Patients „.. 28.064.07 



ROPER HOSPITAL 

Hon. Thomas P Stoney, Mayor, 

Members of City Council, 
% Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : — 

We herewith submit itemized statement of actual expen- 
ses for 1920, 1921, 1922 and 1923. Also estimated budget 
of expenses 1924. 

Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual 

Expense Expense Expense Expense Expense 

SALARIES: 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 

Itemized Itemized Itemized Itemized Itemized 

Superintendent & Ofrice._ -$ 7.134.91 $ 8,276.48 $ 9,313.62 $ 9,050.96 $ 9,840.00 

Nursing ._.... 12,934.86 15,232.77 17,080.56 16,834.98 19,200.00 

Externes & Pharnfects*, 5,834.20 4,720.00 4,205.00 4,020.00 5,400.00 

Culinary Departm«|^. -"!!?:. 6,610.65 5,021.08 5,319.86 4,802.26 6.120.00 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 217 

Dining Room__ ___.. 1,239.53 1.076.39 1,119.78 1,252.99 1,272.00 

Engineer & Firemen -.... 5,363.01 5,062.97 4,695.91 3,805.28 4,620.00 

Laundry Employees 2,994.53 2,778.92 2,493.23 2,644.58 2,736.00 

Linen Room Employees _..._. 1,372.97 1,366.82 1,401.77 1,467.45 1,392.00 

Carpenter & Painter 2,853.37 2,353.84 2,417.90 2,963.60 2,820.00 

Yardman 606.54 549.41 418.50 687.08 672.00 

Orderlies 5,878.48 4,662.81 4,554.47 4,782.42 5,160.00 

Maids 3,147.16 1,974.37 2,480.83 3,542.32 3,816.00 

Ambulance Chauffeur 712.00 629.13 720.00 720.00 720.00 

$56,704.21 .$54,703.99 $56,221.44 $56,573.92 $63,768.00 

Ambulance Expense.- $ 1,814.79 $ 1,993.72 $ 933.54 $ 1,605.41 $ 1,800.00 

New Chasis for Ambulance -. -- -- 3.000.00 



$ 1.814.79 $ 1,993.72 $ 933.54 $ 1,605.41 $ 4,800.00 

FOOD SUPPLIES: 

Groceries, etc. $28,169.67 $21,633.38 $20,068.67 $23,236.50 $23,236.00 

Meats - 22,653.04 17,618.71 15,766.50 16,160.36 16,160.00 

Eggs 5,489.91 4,565.92 4,243.53 4,034.73 4,034.00 

Milk 8,563.13 7,308.41 7,993.50 8,127.27 8.127.00 

Bread -..- -... 3,108.65 2,817.84 2,948.86 2,548.55 2,548.00 

Ice 2,435.84 1,373.12 2,354.05 1,726.56 1,726.00 

Fruits and Vegetables 6,382.96 4,083.63 4,367.87 3,685.07 3,685.00 



$74,803.26 $59,399.01 $57,744.36 $59,519.04 $59,516.00 

HOSPITAL SUPPLIES: 

Gauze and Cotton $ 1,748.52 $ 2,215.87 $ 2,740.24 $ 4,724.71 $ 4,524.00 

4,871.17 2,963.52 3,706.75 3,708.00 
873.95 1,054.00 1,371.49 1,571.00 
680.53 281.07 1,086.42 1,086.00 
1,055.32 1,262.27 1,033.08 1,033.00 
1,490.97 2,294.35 2,424.18 2,424.00 
6,382.04 6,854.62 6,227.32 6,850.00 
178.06 



Linen 


4.286.92 


Rubber Goods 


379.72 


Enamel Ware, etc. 


1,542.12 




1,005.23 


Instruments 


1,128.36 


General Suplies 


8,085.51 


Dental Supplies 




X-Ray 





325 30 325 00 

Kitchen Equipment - 66.00 360.00 1,089.'53 1,000.00 

Hospital Equipment 2,772.33 2.750.00 



$18,176.37 $17,636.66 $17,988.10 $24,761.11 $25,269.00 



GENERAL EXPENSES: 

Fuel g 

Engine Supplies and Repairs- 

Building Repairs 

Laundry Supplies 

Electricity and Gas ...__ 

Stationery. Printing & Stamps 

Telephone & Telegraph 

Car Fare and Exchange 

Expense Lunatics to Columbia 

Office Fixtures 

Refrigerating Plant 

Insurance 1,17? 

Sunday General Expense ___ 

Thompson Annex 

Collection Bad Accounts __ 24.20 

Pay Roll Averaeg Account 5.00 



Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Expense 


Expense 


Expense 


Expense 


Expense 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


Itemized 


Itemized 


Itemized 


Itemized 


Itemized 


; 9,518.97 


$ 9,602.00 


$10,915.61 


$13,467.26 


$13,467.00 


935.12 


1,822.23 


1,888.91 


1,663.77 


1.800.00 


6.471.83 


3,097.00 


5,860.45 


5,054.06 


6,000.00 


1,044.92 


1,479.67 


1,178.49 


2,721.39 


2,100.00 


3,663.29 


4,484.86 


4,171.75 


5,203.11 


5,203.00 


2,463.53 


2,734.23 


2,340.46 


2,190.30 


2,340.00 


546.21 


688.92 


682.65 


833.10 


833.00 


86.41 


82.01 


81.37 


84.19 


84.00 


262.54 


1,390.64 


842.70 


770.65 


770.00 


379.10 


40.75 


149.15 


92.75 


250.00 


3,341.45 


228.66 
1.175.00 








1,175.00 


1,436.72 


1,457.52 


1,450.00 


2,669.61 


2,696.61 
1.061.21 


1,553.52 


1,375.23 


1,800.00 



$33,557.98 $30,494.38 $31,126.69 $34,918.23 $36,097.00 
Total Actual Expenses .___ $193,368.91 $171,336.94 $171,956.52 $188,321.39 $189,450.00 

Actual Expenses 1922 $171,956.52 

Actual Expenses 1923 _..._ ...__ 188,321.39 

Increase in Expenses for 1923 over 1922 $ 16.364.87 



218 Mmyer Grace's Annual Review 

Actual Expenses for 1923 $188,321.39 

Estimated Expenses for 1924 189,450.00 

Estimated Increase for 1924 _ $ 1,128.61 

INCOME FOR 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923 AND ESTIMATED INCOME FOR 1924: 



1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


Income 


Income 


Income 


Income 


Income 


Itemized 


Itemized 


Itemized 


Itemized 


Estimated 



Riverside Department ,. $ 42,644.62 i? 43,064.98 $ 49,352.14 $ 43,013.15 $ 43,013.15 

Roper-Pay Patients 60,908.70 40.757.88 25,840.30 30,736.88 30,736.88 

County Appropriation ... 25,000.00 25,000.00 25,000.00 25,000.00 25,000.00 

City of Charleston 60,000.00 57,601.94 60,000.00 81,937.55 90,699.97 



$188,553.32 $168,424.80 $160,192.44 $180,687.58 $189,450.00 

Appropriation asked for City of Charleston for 1924 ......$90,699.97 

Appropriation asked from City of Charleston for deficit for 1923 8,868.70 



Total Appropriation asked from the City of Charleston..... $99,568.67 

Respectfully Submitted, 

G. McF. MOOD, M. D. 
Chairman Board of Com. Roper Hospital 



ROPER HOSPITAL 

To the Board of Commissioners, 
Roper Hospital, 

Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : — 

I would urgently recommend that the following addition- 
al budget for the year 1924 be allowed for the items en- 
umerated below : 



Salaries : 

Nursing „ .$2,304.00 

Internes 1,800.00 



-$4,104.00 



Kitchen Equipment : 

Steam- jacketed Kettles (3) - __ 750.00 

Triple Coffee Urn (1) 500.00 

Range Coal 1,500.00 

Dish Washer and Serving Table '250.00 

3,000.00 

Hospital Equipment : 

Water Sterilizers (4) 1,600.00 

Instrument Sterilizers (2) 250.00 

Dressing Sterlizers (2) 1,200.00 

Chairs for Patients 100).— _ -....( 750.00 



Laundry Equipment : 

Flat Work Ironer 4,000.00 



3,800 
4,000.00 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 219 

Building Repairs: 

Replacing present wood floor with Terrazo 
in Hallways, Second and Third Floors, 

2,029 square feet 2,029.00 

Tiling Bath Rooms, C. S. W 1,590.00 

Tubs and Showers, C. S. W.(4) 452.00 

Installation above _ 350.00 

Running New Stack and Removing four 

Toilets 315.00 

Remodelling North Basement Rooms for 

a Morgue __ - 1,984.00 

6,720.00 

$21,624.00 

The above figures are approximated, but are as nearly 
accurate as is possible at this time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. O. BATES 

Superintendent. 



Charleston, S. C, Jan. 1st, 1924 

Hon. A. W. Todd, Senator, 

Members of the House of Representatives, 
County of Charleston, 

Capitol Building, Columbia, S. C. 

Gentlemen : — 

We herewith submit the fourth annual report of patients 
treated for the County of Charleston, for the year 1923. 
These figures represent the actual number of patients treat- 
ed, number of days treatment furnished and number of 
treatments gives in the Out-Patient department of the Hos- 
pital. You will also find attached to this report an itemized 
list of patients treated in the Hospital and in the Out-Patient 
department of the Plospital during the past year, giving the 
names, addresses, by whom permits are issued, date of ad- 
mission, date of discharge or death, total days in Hospital 
and case number, which we hope will furnish you with all 
the information you desire. However, if any further infor- 
mation is wanted, we will gladly furnish it. 



220 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 

Number of patients treated in wards 424 

Number of patients treated in Insane Department - 22 

Number of new patients treated in Out-Patient Department 377 

Number of old patients treated in Out-Patient Department 663 

Total patients treated in all departments - 1,486 

The Items of Actual Expenses are as follows : 

Days treatment furnished ward patients, 8,207, at $3.00 $24,621.00 

Days treatment furnished insane patients, 428, at $4.00 1,712.00 

Actual expenses of Lunatics to Columbia _ 207.50 

Actual cost of X-Ray Examinations 595.00 

Number of treatments furnished out-patients, 1,040, at $1.00.... 1,040.00 

$28,175.00 

Daily average patients treated 26j/^ 

Monthly average number patients treated 123.833 

You will see from the above figures that the total cost of 
caring for the poor sick of the County of Charleston, for 
the past year exceeded the appropriation of $25,000.00 by 
$3,175.50. 

There has been a gradual increase in the number of ap- 
plicants applying for treatment during the year 1923, and 
as we stated in our last annual report, ''if this keeps up, an 
appropriation of $25,000.00 will not be sufficient to meet 
the actual expenses of caring for the County sick poor." 
The financial conditions are about as they were a year 
ago. and for this reason we cannot anticipate any cause 
for a decrease during the coming year, but on the contrary 
we may expect a further increase in the number of applicants 
for 1924. 

Believing that it will cost at least as much to care for the 
poor county sick during 1924, as it cost last year, we ask 
that an appropriation of $28,175.50 be made for this pur- 
pose. 

Cost of supplies for the past year were very much ad- 
vanced over 1922 and the outlook for 1924 appears to be 
for even higher prices than 1923. 

We wish to take this opportunity of again tha,nking each 
of you for your support in the past, and hope our efforts 
in behalf of the sick poor of our County will merit your 
support for the year 1924. 

Respectfully yours, 

G. McF. MOOD, M. D., 
Chairman Board of Commissioners. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 221 

REPORT OF PATHOLOGIST, YEAR 1923. 



DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY 
Specimens Examined for Roper Hospital and Riverside Infirmary 

DURING THE YEAR 1923 I 



Positive 

Blood for Typhoid Agglutinin 79 

Blood for Para A Typhoid Agglutinin 00 

Blood for Para B Typhoid Agglutinin 00 

Blood Cultures: 

Blood Cultures Non Hemol. Streptococcus .... 1 

Sputa for Tuberculosis B 

Swabs for Diptheria 116 

Swabs for Meningococcus 

Pus from Ulcer Staphylococcus 1 

Pus from Ear Staphylococcus Aureus 1 

Pus from Staphylococcus 4 

Pus from Staphylococcus Albus 1 

Pus from Staphylococcus Aureus 1 

Pus from Ear Hemol Streptococcus 2 

Pus for Streptococcus 6 

Pus for Non Hemol. Streptococcus 1 

Pus for B. Tuberculosis 

Pus for B. Pyogenus 1 

Pus for B. Coli 2 

Pus for B. Capsulatus 1 

Pus Smear for Gonococcus 2 

Knee Fluid 

Pleural Fluid Non Hemol. Streptococcus 2 

Pleural Fluid for Staphyolcoccus 1 

Pleural Fluid for Pneumococcus 1 

Spinal Fluid for Staphylococcus Albus 3 

Spinal Fluid Staphylococcus 6 

Spinal Fluid Meningococcus 1 

Spinal Fluid for Pneumonoccus 4 

Urine for B. Coli 2 

Urine for Staphylococcus 2 

Urine for B. Pneumococcus 1 

Urine for T3Aphoid 

Urine for Non Hemol. Streptococcus 2 

Urine for B. Tuberculosis 

Feces for Ameoba _ 1 

Feces for Ova 

Feces for Typhoid 

Hospital Supplies for Sterility 1 

246 



Negative 


Total 


182 


261 


2 


2 


2 


2 


21 


22 








306 


422 


7 


7 





1 





1 





4 





1 





1 





2 





5 





1 


1 


1 





1 





2 





1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4 





1 





1 


1 


4 


6 


12 


6 


7 


1 


5 


1 


3 





2 





1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 





1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


33 


34 



559 



804 



k 



222 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 

LABORATORY OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

Board of Commissioners, 
Roper Hospital, 

Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : 

Herewith, I beg to submit the report of examination 
made in this laboratory for Roper Hospital during the 
year 1923. 

The examinations made for patients, including both those 
in the wards and out-patient department, are classified 
as follows: 
Blood: 

Hemoglobin 2483 

Red Cell Counts 765 

White Cell Counts _ 2427 

Differential 2407 

Malaria _ 1436 

Filaria 14 

Coagulation time - 45 

Group Aggulation 43 

Wassermann tests 2750 

Fragility test 2 

Reticulated cell count _ 2 

Chemical Analysis : 

N. P. N 194 

Urea Nitrogen 191 

Uric Acid 147 

Creatinin 188 

Sugar 292 

Sugar Tolerance _ 6 

Co2 Von Slyke - 7 

Co2 Alvole Tention 1 

Calcium 69 

Liver Test 2 

13.470 

Basal Metabolic Rate 32 

Urine : 

Routine _ 7674 

Phthalein Test _ 314 

Quantitative Sugar 355 

Urea _ 4 

Diazo, Russo, Weiss _ _ 36 

Mosenthal 124 

Bile „ 1 

Morphine - 1 

T. B. _ 7 

8,519 

22.020 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 223 

Sputum : 

Routine (pos. T. B. 75) 358 

Feces : 

Routine 350 

Ova Hook (pos. 30) 
Ascaris (pos. 15) 
Amoeba (pos. 1) 

Exudes and Transudates : 

Genital for G. C. (pos 42) „ 186 

Genital Treponema pallida 4 

Peritoneal „ 1 

Pleural Chemical 2 

Pleural Routine 14 

Eye 11 

Throat „ 2 

Ulcers - 3 

Skin for Tinea , 1 

Donovan Granuloma Bodies 12 

Joint 2 

Liver Abscess 1 

Cerebro- Spinal Fluid 

Routine 83 

Wassermann 80 

Collodial Gold 7?> 



Gastric Contents: 

Routine - _ 59 



Wassermann Results egr Year Ending 1923. 



474 



Total 23,261 

Including Kahn 2,000 



"egative 


1 Plus 


2 Plus 


3 Plus 


4 Plus 


A. C. 


1,401 


60 


89 


218 


869 


113 



25,261 



2750 

Positive 45% 2% 3% 

8% 32% 5% 

Negative 50% 

Malaria Clinically diagnosed. 18 lb. diagnosed 14 {77%) 

Tertian 11 (79%) 

Quartan — 1(7%) 

Aestivo-autumnal 2 ( 14% ) 

Blood Chemicals, 1,095. 



224 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcvieiv 

During the past five years there has been an increase of about 3000 
examinations each year, which is here shown : 

Year Laboratory examinations 

1919 9,932 

1920 ...._ 12,815 

1921 _ 17,065 

1922 20,114 

1923 23,261 

The total number of examinations made at the request 
of attending physicians and surgeons is 23,261 ; and in ad- 
dition to this, for our own purpose of investigation, we 
made 2,000 Kahn Floculation Tests to determine the com- 
parative vakie of this test to the VVassermann reaction in 
syphiHs. This gives a grand total of 25,261 examinations. 

As a result of our years work, we have made the follow- 
ing investigations: *'A Comparative Study of 2,000 Kahn 
and Wassermann Tests;" *'An Investigation of the Re- 
sults of 2,750 Wassermann by the Kolmer Quantitative 
Method" ; ''Species of Malarial Organisims found in Char- 
leston" ; ''Relative Value of Functional Tests of the 
Kidney" ; "A Comparison of Blood Chemical Examinations 
and Functional Kidney Tests in Chronic Interstitial Neph- 
ritis" ; "Results of Wassermann and Collodial Gold Tests 
on Spinal Fluid" ; "Types of Organisms found in Spinal 
Fluid in Meningitis". 

The results of some of these have been reported and 
reports on the others will soon be made. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

FRANCIS B. JOHNSON, M. D., 

Clinical Pathologist. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 225 

ROPER HOSPITAL AND RIVERSIDE DEPARTMENTS 

Roper Hospital, 

Surgicals for diagnosis 351 

Frozen Sections (Roper and Riverside) 12 

Autoposies _ 77 

Riverside Department, 

Surgicals for diagnosis 57 

Out-Patient Department _ 9 

506 
Respectfully submitted, 

FREDERICK H. DIETERICH, M. D., 

Pathologist. 



The Board of Commissioners, 
Roper Hospital, 
City, 

Gentlemen : 

The above is a report of the work done in the Department 
of Pathology of Roper Hospital during the year 1923. 

It is a great encouragement to the member of this De- 
partment to see the new autopsy room and morgue, which 
the Commissioners have added to our scientific equipment, 
being completed. 

We are considerably handicapped by the meagre technical 
assistance for doing the routine work of the Department, 
and trust that the Board of Commissioners may continue 
their kind assistance and encouragement, for an even better 
institution, by providing us with either another technician 
or a stenographer. 

Respectfully, 

FREDERICK H. DIETERICH, M. D. 



226 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT REPORT FOR THE YEAR 

1923. 

Board of Commissioners, 
Roper Hospital, 

Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : 

There was a moderate decrease in the number of X-Ray 
examinations made for free cases during the past year as 
compared to the previous year, but about 20% increase as 
compared to 1921. This probable result of peak of business 
depression having passed. The number of examinations 
made of cases in private wards in Roper and of cases in 
the Thompson Memorial were about the same. The neces- 
sity for treatment with X-Ray and Radium is more apparent 
than ever and a great many have to be refused on account 
of the expense entailed; only the most favorable can be ac- 
cepted and many others that might be benefited or given 
some relief have to be refused on acocunt of our lack of 
means to do more. 

All diagnostic cases are handled but treatment has to be 
curtailed. We cannot too strongly urge the necessity of an 
even small further expenditure ($500.00) and an increase 
of this work which is doing so much to at least relieve this 
unfortunate class of cases. 

The following is a resume' of the work done in 1923 : 

Free cases in Wards 505 

O. P. D. Cases 159 

Total Free Cases 664 

Private Cases in Hospital 107 

Cases in Thompson 108 

8 Free Cases treated with X-Ray and Radium. 
8 Private Cases in Roper treated with X-Ray and Radium. 
8 Cases in Thompson treated with X-Ray and Radium. 
Respetcfully submitted, 

A. ROBERT TAFT, M. D., 
j ; Roentgenologist. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 227 

SHIRRAS DISPENSARY. 

E. L. Jager, M. D. 
Chief of Clinics 

R. B. Gantt, M. D. 
Asst: Chief of Clinics 

MEDICINE 

J. A. Finger, M. D. J. H. Cannon, M. D. 

O. B. Chamberlain, M. D. F. R. Price, M. D. 

SURGERY 

M. K. Mazyck, M. D. F. G. Cain, M. D. 

T. E. Bowers. M. D. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY, OTOLOGY and LARYNGOLOGY 

C. W. Kollock, M. D. J. F. Townsend, M. D. 

J. E. Smith, M. D. 

OBSTETRICS 

H. K. Jenkins, M. D. R. L- McCrady, M. D. 

H. W. deSaussure. M. D. 

GYNECOLOGY 

H. W. deSaussure, M. D. R. L. McCrady, M. D. 

C. A. Speissegger, M. D. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 
A. R. Taft, M. D. 

PEDIATRICS 

M. W. Beach, M. D. W. M. Rhett, M. D. 

G. F. Heidt, M. D. A. E. Baker, Jr., M. D. 

DERMATOLOGY 
J. H. Cannon, M. D. 

UROLOGY 

J. J. Ravenel, M. D. W. L- A. Wellbrock M. D. 

A. E. Baker, Jr., M. D. 

LABORATORY 

F. B. Johnson, M. D. W. L- A. Wellbrock, M. D. 

BACTERIOLOGY 
G. McF. Mood, M. D. 

PATHOLOGY 
F. H. Dietrich, M. D. H. H. Plowder, M. D. 



228 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 





DENTISTS 


Dr. L. W. Bonnoitt 


Dr. L. E. Knobeloch 


Dr. W. S. Brown 


Dr. N. S. Lea 


Dr. L. P. Dotterer 


Dr. C. S. Patrick 


Dr. C. B. Colson 


Dr. Cassie Patrick 


Dr. Thomas Dotterer 


Dr. E. Y. Smith 


Dr. E. M. Gaffney 


Dr. R. A. Smith 


Dr. T. E. Harper 


Dr. J. S. Smith 


Dr. L. B. Kerrison 


Dr. H. Mc. I. Wilbur 



Dr. U. h Wilbur 



Charleston, S. C, January 18th, 1924. 

The Board of Trustees, 

Shirr as Dispensary, 

Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith present to you the annual report of patients 
treated in the Shirras Dispensary at Roper Hospital for 
the year 1923 including new patients, old patients and total 
visits in the various departments which are as follows : 



New Patienst 

Medical _ 1611 

Surgical 1192 

Dental _ 342 

Skin 73 

Obstetrical -._ 360 

Gynecological 564 

GcniLo-Urinary 770 

Pediatric 1038 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 1167 

Vaccination (Sch Children) 1405 

8S22 

Male Patients 3073 

Female Patients 4044 

Vaccination (Sch Children) 1405 

8522 

White Patients 1501 

Colored Patients 5616 

Vaccination (Sch Children) 1405 

8522 



d Patients 


Total Visits 


5760 


7371 


2763 


4955 


707 


1049 


94 


167 


760 


1120 


928 


1492 


2589 


3359 


2125 


3163 


2436 


3593 




1405 


19152 


27674 


6841 


9914 


12311 


16355 




1405 


19152 


27674 


3083 


' 4584 


16169 


21685 





1405 



19152 



Respectfully submitted, 
F. O. BATES, 



27674 



Superintendent, 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 229 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Charleston, S. C, January 31st, 1924. 

The Board of Commissioners, 
Roper Hospital, 

Charleston, S. C. 

Gentlemen : 

I beg to submit the report of the School of Nursing of the 
Medical College of the State of South Carolina for the year 
ending January 1st, 1923. 

The Staff of the school is as follow : 

Superintendent of Nurses 1 

Instructress of Nurses 1 

Supv of Roper Operating room and Obstetrical Dept. 1 

Supervior Roper Hospital Wards — Colored Medical, 
White Medical, Pediatric, Tuberculosis, Venereal, 
Psychiatric, Contagious, Colored Surgical and 
White Surgical 

Night Supervisor Roper Hospital 

Supervisor Out-Patient Department — 

Supervisor Riverside Infirmary 

Riverside Operation Room Supervisor 

Dietitian 

Students in school December 31st, 1923: 

Graduate Students 5 

Seniors 18 

Juniors 20 

Freshmen 13 

Total 56 

Requests for application blanks 91 

Applications received 40 

Probationers admitted 31 

Probationers resigned 4 



230 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Probationers not accepted 5 

Students dismissed 2 

Students graduated 6 

Students who resigned 8 

Students given indefinite leave of absence (both because 

they had contracted pulmonary tuberculosis) 2 

Cases of illness during year 54 

Days lost through illness during year 354 

The school year just completed has been beset with diffi- 
culties. Owing to the dengue epidemic of last year during 
which time the class work was suspended, there was a great 
deal of extra class work to be made up. Because of an in- 
adequate number of nurses to care for the patients during 
class hours we were obliged to divide some of the classes in- 
to sections, thus necessitating a repitition of courses on the 
part of a number of instructors of the Medical College. I 
wish to take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation 
for the cooperation and ready willingness with which the 
instructors of the Medical College took over this extra work 
and the kind consideration they showed in arranging their 
hours of instruction so as to meet the demands of the hos- 
pital. Without this cooperation it woud have been very 
hard to have arranged the class work at convenient hours 
•for attendance by both day and night nurses. 

On the whole we feel gratified at the interest the student 
body has shown in the class work. Honors (average 
grades over 90 per cent for the year) have been won by 
six students. These students deserve special commendation 
because these honors were won while they were carrying 
heavy duties in the hospital wards and also because the 
record of work on the wards was in each case as good as 
the class room record. 

One great improvement in teaching facilities was the fit- 
ting out of a demonstration room. This room is provided 
with four hospital beds and is completely equipped with 
trayS; utensils, rubber goods etc., to enable the students to 
have demonstrated to them and to practice all of the re- 
quired nursing procedures. Credit is due to Miss Martha 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 231 

Erdmann, instructress in Nursing, for the planning and 
equipping of this room. 

Another great advantage to the school has been the ap- 
pointment, by the hospital, of a graduate dietitian and the 
equipment of a new dietetic laboratory and food kitchen 
where each student spends a month in preparing special 
diets under the direction of the dietitian. 

Some of the most pressing needs of the School are as fol- 
lows : 

There should be a larger Nurses' Home in which the 
students could be given comfortable single rooms. A library 
and study room is greatly needed and a recreation room 
should be provided. Practically all other types of schools 
including Y. W. C. A.'s recognize the recreational needs of 
their students by providing recreation halls, gymnasia, etc. 
The young women who attend a school of nursing and at 
the same time care for the city's sick and poor especially 
need and deserve the ordinary facilities for students' re- 
creation. 

A house mother to look after the social needs of the 
students would be greatly desirable. 

Graduate charge nurs^es should be placed in the v/ards 
both for the interest of the Hospital as well as the students. 
This would stabilize the ward work by obviating the fre- 
quent changes necessitated by keeping student nurses in 
charge and would provide better teaching and supervision 
of the work of the students. 

The greatest need of the school is an increase in the num- 
ber of its students. It is a recognized fact that in order to 
give efficient care in a hospital there should be one nurse 
to every five ward patients and one to every three private 
room patients for day duty and one nurse to ten ward pa- 
tients and one to five private room patients for night duty. 
We have one nurse caring for eight, ten and tv/elve ward 
patients and one to four or five private room patients on day 
duty and one to twenty-five to one to fifty ward patients 
with one to twelve to one to fifteen private room patients at 
night. This is a most deplorable condition. 



232 Mayor Grace's Annual Reinew 

It will be seen by the report that there has been a great 
deal of illness in the school. This is not surprising consider- 
ing the physical strain of long hours and hard work for so 
small a student body to care for the patients of a general 
hospital with an average daily census of 191 patients in ad- 
dition to caring for an active Out-Patients' Department. 

It would seem that with a modern Nurses' Home large 
enough to accomodate the additional students and with suf- 
ficient publicity to acquaint prospective students with the 
advantage of a school with a college connection and a variety 
of clinical material, there should be no trouble in securing an 
adequate enrollment. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to the 
student body and the superv^isory staff for their splendid 
support and cooperation, to Mr. Bates, Superintendent of 
the Hospital for his support and cooperation, to the members 
of the Training School Committee and the Staff of the Hos- 
pital for their kindness and help and especially to Dean 
Robert Wilson for his invariable cooperation and splendid 
support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANNA LAUMAN, 
Superintendent of Nurses. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 233 

JUVENILE WELFARE COMMISSION. 

February 19, 1924. 
Hon. Thomas P. Stoney, 

Mayor of the City of Charleston, Charleston, S. C. 
My dear Mr. Stoney : — 

Enclosed herewith is the report of the Director of the 
Juvenile Welfare Commission and financial statement for 
the year 1923. 

Your attention, and that of City Council, is called to the 
very urgent need for an increase in the force of workers 
in this office. The Director has repeatedly called to the at- 
tention of the Commission, the fact that she is unable to 
cope with the present situation, with any adequacy, with the 
present lack of sufficient workers. The situation has be- 
come so grave that it will be necessary to limit the field 
which the office attempts to cover unless the force can be 
enlarged by at least two field workers and a stenographer. 
One of these field v/orkers should be a man. The situation 
is very grave and warrants the earnest consideration of the 
City. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER B. WILBUR, 

Chairman. 



The following report of the work attempted by the office 
is submitted with the hope that it will enable the commission 
to bring to the attention of the Mayor and City Council not 
the amount of work accomplished but the number of cases 
which were either left entirely untouched or were inade- 
quately handled. 



CASE REPORT 
Cases brought over from 1922 




.. -.695 


Cases reported during 

White 

Colored 


1923: 


399 

347 




Total 






746 


Grand Total 






....1441 



234 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

These 746 cases were reported by: 

Police Department _ _ 250 

Juvenlie Officer 65 

Women's Bureau 185 

Judge of Probate Magistrate, Mayor, Solicitor, etc 24 

Local social agencies, hospitals, physicians, schools and citizens 263 

Discovered by officer and referred by Commissioners 78 

Parents and relatives _ 94 

Out of Town Special Agencies Z7 

Total » _..746 

These 746 cases included: 

Boys _ 404 

Girls _ _ „ 342 

Total „ _ 746 

There were 401 children under twelve years of age and 345 twelve 
years and over. 

These children were divided into two groups : 
Dependent : 

Boys _ _ 202 

Girls - _ 231 

To tal _ 433 

Delinquent : 

Boys 201 

Girls - 112 

Total _ „ 313 

Total -„ „ - - 746 

These 746 children were distributed in 529 family groups. 

Out of this number 116 required Court Action: 
Dependent : 

Boys _ 9 

Girls 14 

Total 23 

Deinquent: 

Boys _ „ 82 

Girls 11 

Total „ _ 93 

Total „ _ 116 

Twenty-one cases were committed to Industrial Schools as follows: 

Souh Carolina Indusrial School for Boys (White) 9 

South Carolina Industrial School for Colored Boys 7 

South Carolina Industrial School for Girls (White) 3 

Fairwold Industrial School for Girls (Colored) 2 

Total 21 

Through volunteer service 51 mental tests were made. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 235 

We have closed seven hundred and sixty-nine cases this 
year but many of them have been closed with the feeling 
that little was accomplished, for many waited so long for at- 
tention, that our time for usefulness was passed. When 
you realize that these are children whose lives are being 
shaped and not inanimate objects, the figures mean real 
tragedy. 

Medical Care 

Through the cooperation of the private physicians and 
the Roper Hospital, an average of thirty-two children and 
three parents were given medical attention each month. 
This involved approximately four hundred and twenty-one 
visits. The Public Health Nursing Service has also assisted 
on all cases of children needing health supervision. The 
Commission is deeply indebteded to Mercy Hospital and 
Dr. Wythe Rhett for the care given to babies during the 
year at Mercy Hospital. These babies were neglected and 
were so under-nourished that it was very doubtful whether 
their lives could have been saved except for the devotion 
of the doctors and nurses of this Hospital. 

The Emergency Fund 

The Emergency Fund was used to assist the following 
forty-eight children : — six committed to the Commission by 
the Court ; five accepted for emergency care pending accep- 
tance in an Institution ; eight runaway boys and eleven run- 
away girls from other Cities until they could be returned 
home; five given emergency care during illness of parents 
where there were neither relatives to care for them nor any 
Institution; eight deserted children and five who were ill 
treated and neglected in their homes and for whom perma- 
nent plans had to be worked out. The Emergency Fund was 
used to care for forty-eight children who could not be pro- 
vided for by any other agency. On January 1st, 1924, there 
was $96.83 cash in hand of this fund, and $83.33 credit in 
the City Treasury, making a total of $180.16. Out of the 
$819.84 which had been spent, $161.25 was the greatest 
amount spent on one child. The average cost per child was 
$17.08. 



236 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Cooperation with Other Agencies 

The Commission is very much indebted to all the Social 
Agencies in the Cty for assistance rendered, even after 
this office, in October, was obliged to refuse assistance to 
them in their work because of the congestion in our office. 
The Associated Charities helped on every case involving 
need which we had during the year. The King's Daugh- 
ter's Day Nursery provided emergency care for about twen- 
ty-six children for periods varying from one day to several 
weeks. Seven of these children were paid for in full or 
in part by the parents or guardians. Eleven were cared 
for free while the mothers were ill in the hospital for per- 
iods varying from one day to two weeks. Eight were paid 
for out of the Emergency Fund. This was not asked by 
the Day Nursery until their funds gave out during the late 
summer. 

Dependency 

Attention is directed to the fact that the number of de- 
pendent children is considerably higher than the number 
of delinquent children. Also that the dependent children 
here listed are in addition to those in the orphanages of 
our City. There is urgent need for a study of the causes 
of this large dependency problem. The best approach 
would be through study of the cases on file in our office 
and of the intake of the dependent institutions ; the study 
of the boys and girls who are leaving school either when 
they reach fourteen years of age or when they graduate; 
how they are equipped for work and how they find work. 
Each one of these boys and girls is a potential factor in a 
new generation dependent or semi-dependent children. The 
establishment of a junior employment and vocational guid- 
ance service in connection with the public schools and of 
a scholarship fund by which children who have the intel- 
lectual equipment can be continued in school by the payment 
of small weekly sums to their parents to compensate for 
w^hat the child would be earning should he be put to work 
and the careful placing in positions of all children for whom 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 237 

further schooling is not recommended, would relieve us of 
a large number of pre-delinquent and delinquent children 
as well as be a preventive from further dependency. But 
of more importance is the fact that it would mean lives 
made worthwhile and wholesome and happy and be the 
foundation of better citizenship. 

The Work with Colored Children 

The work with colored children is increasing steadily each 
month brings more requests from parents of these children 
for assistance and our worker has been able to do a very 
real educational work with the parents as to their responsi- 
bility to their own children. The Children's Relief Circle 
organized in 1922, has been of great assistance in providing 
funds for milk and clothing for these children. The next 
step in this field is the organization of a family welfare 
agency with; trained case workers. The material need 
among the colored people is so great, the standard of living 
so low that a specialized agency for strengthening the fam- 
ily group and raising both the economic and moral standard 
is very necessary. At present there is a movement among 
the leaders of their race to organize and finance such an 
agency. It is hoped that they will have the earnest cooper- 
ation of the present Social Agencies both white and colored 
and of the City of Charleston. 

Growth Since Oeeice was Organized 

The following review will show how far the work has 
out grown the increase in the staff. The office was opened 
in May, 1919 with a Director, in 1920 a part time steno- 
grapher and an Assistant Director were added, in 1921 no 
additions were made, in 1922 a worker with colored chil- 
dren was added, but this also added a new field of work. 
In 1923 no additions were made but the stenographer was 
employed for the whole day instead of part time. 

When the report of the work done during the year 1922 
was submitted a very frank statement was made of the 
number of calls, that it was found impossible to answer 



238 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

and the number of children that could not be reached or 
cared for by this office with the present staff. This con- 
dition is even more true today and either the staff must be 
increased or a very definite change will have to be made in 
the field we attempt to cover. 

The following will show how the work has increased 
since the office opened : 

1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 

Number of Case Workers.... 12 2 3 3 

Cases brought over 46 153 236 695 672 

New Cases 108 275 286 766 746 

Boys 41 116 132 386 404 

Girls 67 113 154 380 342 

Twelve years and over 66 116 123 325 345 

Under twelve years 42 113 163 439 401 

Cases Closed 62 168 203 390 769 

Family Groups 510 529 

Total No. of Children 108 321 449 1,002 1,441 

The Commission office was opened in May 1919 and as 
will be seen from the above tabulation during the eight 
months of the year, 108 cases were reported. Sixty-two 
of these cases were closed and forty-six were carried over 
into 1920. Two hundred and seventy-five cases were re- 
ported in 1920, making a total of three hundred and twenty- 
one cases handled during that year. One hundred and 
fifty-three of these cases were carried into 1921 and two 
hundred and eighty six more cases were reported that year, 
making a total of four hundred and forty-nine children 
handled. Two hundred and thirty-six of these cases were 
carried into 1922 and seven hundred and sixty-six new 
cases were added, making a total of one thousand and two 
children handled in that year. Owing to the accumulation 
of cases, six hundred and ninety-five of that number were 
carried into 1923 as open cases. Seven hundred and forty- 
six new cases were added, making a total of one thousand 
and forty-one cases in 1923, despite the fact that every 
call which could be refused has been turned down. Further 
more in October a letter was sent to the other Social Agen- 
cies in the City stating that this office could not accept any 
more cases from them until further notice. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 239 

Development 

The Commission is most deeply * indebted to the Child 
Welfare League of America for their most generous as- 
sistance in the loan of Miss Helen D. Cole, who had charge 
of the office for three months from August 15th, during 
the absence of the Director. The Commission was admit- 
ted to membership in the League on March 23rd, 1923, hav- 
ing met the requirements. That we should be eligible with 
all the handicaps imder which the work has developed is a 
matter for congratulation, and it carries with it the respon- 
sibility for raising the standard of work. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR 1923. 
Salaries : 

Director $1,500.00 

Assistant Director 1,200.00 

Stenographer 900.00 

Colored Worker 900.00 

$4,500.00 

Emergency Fund for Children 1,000.00 

Rent: Waring & Brockington 240.00 

Gas: Chas. Consolidated Rwy. and Ltg. Co 53.32 

Thone: Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company, 

Phone $ 55.44 

Toll Calls 111.60 

167.04 

To Associated Charities for Membership 5.00 

To Social Service Exchange for Membership 24.00 

Walker, Evans and Cogswell Co., for Office 157.07 

Ellington-Malone, for repairs to typewriter 12.00 

Charleston Ptg. House, for letter heads, envelops, etc 45.50 

Cowperthwait & Co., for six chairs 12.00 

New Charleston City Directory 8.00 

Louis D. Rubin Co., for buzzer 11.03 

Extra Stenographic Service: 

Elizabeth Rivers $35.00 

Demaris Ravenel 30JOO 

65.00 

James F. Condon & Sons 7.00 

Petty Cash, travelling expenses, car fare, janitor, taxies 

etc 508.48 

Total $6,815.44 

Appropriation $6,815.44 

Expended 6,815.44 

Respectfully submitted, 
LOUISA deB. FITZ SIMONS, 
January 15, 1924. Director, 



240 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR COLORED ORPHANS 



To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen 

of the City Council of Charleston, S. C. 
Gentlemen : — : 

The Orphan Aid Society of the Jenkins Orphanage beg to submit 
its thirty-second Annual Report through our Honorable Commission- 
ers to your Honorable Body, for the year ending December 20, 1923. 

First, we wish to call your attention to the Ordinance passed and 
ratified by City Council in the year 1897 — whereas it says "the Indus- 
trial School for Colored Orphans of the City of Charleston", let the 
Ordinance be so amended as to read, "the Jenkins Orphanage of Char- 
leston, S, C." This request was made years ago by the Commissioners 
in their report and the same was voted on and carried ; but no further 
action was taken until now. We deem it essential that this Ordinance 
be so changed for the good of the City of Charleston as well as 
for the Orphan Aid Society. This Ordinance was created to comply 
with a petition from the Orphan Aid Socitey for an appropriation 
from the City Council. 

The Orphanage has proven a credit to both our City and State. 
The number of orphans and destitute children cared for is 3,687. We 
raised during the year from all sources $57,034.73. Of this amount 
we received from our orphan bands and entertainments $26,513.32. In 
reading our report carefully, you will find that our institution is doing 
more actual work and getting more out of the children in helping them 
to become self-supporting than any other institution of its kind in 
the United States. 

Gentlemen, read our report carefully. Neither the State, County 
nor School Commissioners have appropriated a dollar in thirty two 
years. Should not greater interest be taken in this work? Shall it 
forever fall on one man who has worked both night and day to train, 
educate, shelter and care for that class of boys and girls left on the 
cold charity of the world to become the future vagabonds, liars, thieves 
and law-breakers? 

It is true that the old Marine Hospital, ,20 Franklin Street, was 
donated to the Orphan Aid Society of the Jenkins Orphanage, which 
marks the beginning of our v/ork. We are conducting now three in- 
dustrial farms — first, the Greenwood Orphan and Industrial Jbarm, 
ninety acres of land; second, the reform and industrial farm, 100 
acres of land, both at Ladson, S. C. ; third, the Lincoln Park In- 
dustrial Farm, one hundred and eighty-six acres of land, six miles 
beyond the city limits, on the Ashley River. They are ail being operated. 
The Girls' Rescue Home is at the Lincoln Park Industrial Farm. It 
would be a source of great inspiration to anyone interested in poor 
girls to visit this farm. The children are taught to work. We have 
several other industries — job printing, shoe making and repairing. We 
publish The Charleston Messenger in our print shop. This weekly 
paper means much to the life of our Institution. 

The work grows. We carried on our roll during the year 265 
boys and girls. We have four brass bands, a combination of one hun- 
dred musicians. To let children play on brass instruments is better 
for their lungs than medicine. The truth of this statement is brought 
out by our report which shows that out of more than three thousand 
boys and girls in thirty-two years, we have lost by death fifteen. We 
will place our record as to health among the children against any in- 
stitution in the land. The report of the Japan Orphanage shows that 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 241 



out of a number of three hundred, fifty-eight died within three years. 
Charleston and South Carolina have been well represented throughout 
the length and breadth of this land and Europe as well, by the brass 
bands of the Jenkins Orphanage. 

We have not worried nor harassed our County and State Board 
for an appropriation. We wanted first to prove our worthiness as 
a race. Feeling that we have done so, we want to petition our City, 
County and State through our Commissioners, Mr. A. J. Riley 
Chairman, appointed by City Council, for the sum of $35,000 — the 
City of Charleston for $15,000 for the Jenkins Orphanage, 20 Frank- 
lin Street; the State for $15,000 for the Girls' Rescue Home, Lincoln 
Park, and the County for $5,000 for the Reform School and Greenwood 
Industrial Farm, Ladson, S. C. The Orphan Aid Society will pledge 
itself to raise $15,000 by voluntary contributions, making a grand 
total of $50,000. It will take this amount at the lowest calculation to 
run the branches of the institution. If however, the City, County or 
State is not willing to make these appropriations without having the 
institution turned over to them, then the Orphan Aid Society is will- 
ing to turn over any part of each or all with property connected there- 
with, as the health of the president and founder is greatly impaired. 
For thirty-two years he has worked without receiving any salary. He 
has been pastoring the Fourth Baptist Church for thirty-five years, 
and during this time he has received from this church for salary over 
thirty thousand dollars. No one would believe how much of his 
salary he has put into the Orphonage to make it succeed. He finds to- 
day that he is not able to do what is required for the church nor the 
institution. Any suggestion or advice for the betterment of the institu- 
tion will be gladly received. 

"The president has been very careful in spending money given for 
charity. The money given for endowment fund was put in real estate, 
all of which was bought in the name of the Orphan Aid Society which 
is held in trust for them. All mortgages on real estate have been paid. 

We are appealing to you as our Honorable Commissioners to go 
before the City, County and State Boards or to arrange for us to get 
before them to explain the impossibility of these branches of this in- 
stitution going on as they are without assistance from the powers that 
be. We hereunto append statement of receipts and disbursements for 
the year 1923. 

RECEIPTS 

Dec. 20, by balance per statement renderied to Dec. 20, '22..$ 556.12 

By cash received from Dec. 20, '22 to Dec. 20, '23 

From Donations Northern and Foreign $ 8,412.37 

From Donation Southern 

Apipropriation City Council 3,000.00 

Other Sources 4,045.12 

15,457.49 

From school contributions 769.20 

From Lincoln Park 533.92 

From Ind. Farm and Reformatory 1,742.01 

From Building Fund 3,289.32 

From interest on special deposit 189.41 

From money borrowed '' 954.34 

From interest on bonds 41.00 

From rents 3,303.33 

From Magazine St., int. on purchase 28.00 



242 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 

From Shoe Rep. Dept 194.82 

P^rom Charleston Messenger 2,037.64 

From Insurance 1,300.00 

From Bands and entertainments 26,513.72 

Overdrawn on bank 124.41 



( $57,034.73 

DISBURSEMENTS 

To Cash paid from Dec. 20, '22 to Dec. 20, '23. 

For Acct. Chas'n Messenger 2,817.23 

For Don. N. F 32.27 

School 840.39 

Lincoln Park 

Acct. Purchase and Repairs 16,190.18 

Sundry House Expenses 8,783.55 

Ind. Farm and Reformatory 2,025.99 

Salary 8,832.93 

Railroad Fares 3,302.90 

Money Borrowed 

Printing 838.57 

Beaufain Street ground 64.92 

Tax 145.25 

Shoe Repair Department 278.77 

Repairs and improvements 10,174.44 

Fire and Life Insurance 810.20 

Bands 1,622.64 

Postage 247.25 

Interest 27.25 

$57,034.73 

Leaving a Balance of $124.47 

Distributed as follows 
No Cash on hand. 

Dep. Carolina Sav. Bank 

Outstanding indebtedness $4,490.47 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

(Rev.) D. J. JENKINS), President 
E. M. CLEMENT, Secretary 

I certify that the above is a correct exhibit from the books of 
the said Society, as of date Dec. 20, 1923. 

J. C. DILLINGHAM, Auditor 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 243 

COMMISSIONERS OF PUBLIC LANDS 



Charleston, S. C, January 8th, 1924 

To his Honor, the Mayor, 

and Members of City Council : 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to present my third Annual Report of 
the Management of the Ashley River Asylum **01d Folks 
Home" for colored people, and the interment of the pauper 
dead under the care and custody of the Commissioners of 
Public Lands. 

The buildings, all of them, have had attention in the way 
of repairs, the roofs of the buildings have been repaired 
and new guttering furnished where needed. The buildings 
and grounds have been kept neat and clean and altogether 
they present a very creditable appearance. 

The matron, the Assistant keeper, and grave digger 
have regularly performed their duties faithfully. We sub- 
mit extracts from the Matron's Annual Report to the 
Board : 

Inmates in Home .= 48 

Admitted during year 23 

Sent to hospital 17 

Died in Home 5 

Average number in Home during year 53 

Interments in Potter's Field : 

White 12 

Coored 227 

Total 239 

I submit the Annual Financial Statement of Secretary 
and Treasurer for the year 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLIFFORD THOMPSON, 

Chairman. 



244 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcvieiv 

Financial Statkmknt. 

To the Commissioners of Public Lands, 
Gentlemen : 

I beg to submit the Financial Statement for the year 
1923: 

Appropriation from Council $4,823.00 

Salaries $1,248.00 

Expenses as per monthly invoices filed 

with City Treasurer 3,202.67 

4,450.67 

Balance with City Treasurer $ Z72.2)2> 

I beg to report having also turned over to City Treasurer 

rent from Farm Land $125.00 

and interment fees 8.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. MARION STONE, 

Secretary and Treasurer, C. P. L. 



COMMISSIONERS FOR THE MANAGEMENT, 
CARE AND CUSTODY OF CONVICTS 

To the Honorable Mayor 

and City Council of Charleston, S. C. 
Gentlemen : 

We beg to submit the report of the Commissioners for the 
management, care and custody of convicts for the year 
ending December 31st, 1923. 

The number of prisoners received during the year was: 

Recorder's Court 201 

Magistrate Court 2 

Total „ 203 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 245 

Divided as follows : 

Colored 203 

White 

Total 203 

Average number of prisoners per diem : 8 

Largest number on any one day 13 

Smallest number on any one day 7 

Average number of sick per diem 4 

Died 

Terms of sentence varied from five to thirty days. 
No females were received during the year. 
The health of the prisoners has been good. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation _ $ 5, 150.00 

Expenses : 

Salary, Superintendent $1,800.00 

Salary, Guards 2,400.00 

Salary, Secretary 300.00 

Salary, Carrying meals 300.00 

Bolts and Shackles 6.75 

Soap 12.00 

$ 4,818.75 

Amount unexpended $ 331.25 

LOCATION AND CHARACTER OF WORK 

January — Digging ditch on Simons street and filling ditch on 
Boulevard. 

February — Cleaning up dump on Gadsden street and spreading 
cinders on Boulevard. 

March — Cleaning up dump on Gadsden street and Beaufain street 
and cleaning out creek, west end of Line street. 

April — Cleaning out creek and building box drain west end Line 
street 500 feet long. 

May — Dressing up roadway on Boulevard and cleaning and dig- 
ging ditch west end of Reid street, also cleaning south of Gadsden 
street, 

June — Digging ditch east end of Columbus street out to emigrant 
station also dressing up Boulevard. 

July — Digging ditch east end of Colurnbus street to the Emigrant 
station also dressing up Boulevard, cleaning up dump off Beaufain 
street and cleaning dump west end of Broad. 

August — Cutting grass on Ashley avenue from Broad to Tradd 
street and south Bay, digging out curbing on Grove street. 

September — Spreading cinders and planting grass on Boulevard. 

October — Raking over Boulevard. 

November — Raking over Boulevard, digging out curbing and 
cutting bushes down on Dunneman's street. 

December — Raking over Boulevard and cutting down weeds on 
Dunneman's street. 



246 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviciu 
HARBOR MASTER 



To the Honorable the Mayor ^^ 
and Aldermen. 

Gentlemen: 

I have the honor to submit the accompanying report of 
the arrivals of vessels at this port for the year ending 
December 31st, 1923. 

It is with pleasure I state that Capt. W, L. Anderson, 
the President and Capt. J. E. Swan, the Secretary of the 
Charleston Pilots Association, and Maj. James D. Lucas, 
Chairman of the Board of Port Wardens, have, as usual, 
rendered the Harbor Master voluntary and valuable services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES ARMSTRONG, 

Harbor Master. 



NO. 1 



MONTHS 



C/l 


4> 


u 


^ 


^ bo 


CO 


C w 


So ^5 




o <u 


a; C 


O bo 




m 


m^ 


^ 



January .... 
February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .... 
September 
October .... 
November 
December 

Totals 



52 


9 


159,413 


64 


7 


183,315 


60 


4 


147,588 


53 


5 


148,385 


66 


4 


198,205 


59 


4 


169,754 


64 


4 


186,489 


63 


5 


179,857 


60 


8 


182,953 


68 


8 


205,032 


68 


5 


192,652 


67 


5 


203,765 


744 


68 


2,157,408 



United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 
United 



States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 
States 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 
NO. 2 



247 



MONTHS 





-x^ 




(U 






to 


^ bo 


^ 


■5 j5 




(U C 


s 




m 


^ 



January .„ . 
January — . 
January .-. 
January ... . 
January .... 
February .. 
February .. 
February .. 
February .. 
March ...... 

March 

March 

March 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

July 

July 

July 

July 

August 

August 

August 

August 

September 

September 

September 

September 

October .— 

October .... 

November 

November 

November 

November 

December 

December 

December 

December 

December 

December 



1 


5,173 


2 


5,270 


3 


5,644 


3 


4,751 


6 


8,429 


5 


13,477 


3 


5,201 


1 


3,218 


3 


7,139 


6 


20,004 


3 


9,097 


2 


3,448 


1 


834 


2 


8,520 


1 


446 


1 


1,353 


1 


3,181 


1 


3,037 


5 


12,763 


3 


11,061 


1 


4,712 


3 


6,734 


1 


4,070 


1 


2,860 


1 


1,480 


1 


5,121 


2 


8,513 


1 


5,915 


1 


3,062 


1 


4,261 


1 


4,260 


1 


2,974 


2 


6,656 


1 


1,059 


1 


3.227 


1 


3,750 


3 


10,336 


1 


3,284 


2 


5,890 


1 3 


6,584 


1 


4,059 


1 


1,988 


1 4 


12,552 


1 


3,570 


5 


18,496 


1 


930 


1 


3,084 


1 


5,590 


4 


12,719 


4 


8,391 


1 


4,112 


1 


3,761 


1 


3,520 


1 


2,305 


mo 


111 071 



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248 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Ordinances Ratified in 1923< 



AN ORDINANCE 

To Pension Glenn E. Davis, Former Cit}'- vSheriff. 

Whereas, Glenn E. Davis has served the City of Charleston faith- 
fully and continuously for more than forty years, therefore 

Be It Ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston, in City 
Council assembled : 

Section 1. That Glenn E. Davis shall receive a pension from the 
City of Charleston of Fifteen hundred ($1,500.00) dollars 
annually, the payments to commence from the dale of his retirement as 
City Sheriff 

Section 2. That the said pension shall be paid to him by the City 
Treasurer in the sum of One hundred and twenty-five ($125.00) 
dollars monthly. 

Section 3. That the pension herein provided for shall cease upon 
the death of the said Glenn E. Davis. 

Ratified January 9, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 

Declaring the result of a Special Election held in the City of Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, on the eighth day of November, 1921, Provid- 
ing for the Issuance of $500,000.00 Bonds of the City of Charleston 
for the Purchase, Establishment, Maintenance and Increase of the 
Sewerage system of the City of Charleston, and to Authorize the 
issue of Sewerage Bonds by the City Council of Charleston, to an 
amount not exceeding $500,000.00. 

Whereas, at a regular meeting of the City Council of Charleston, 
held on the 12th day of July, 1921, a majority of the free-holders of 
the City of Charleston, as shown by its tax books, duly filed a petition 
with the City Council of Charleston to order a Special Election in 
said city for the purpose of issuing bonds not exceeding $500,000.00, 
the proceeds of which bonds to be used solely for the purchase, 
establishment, maintenance and increease of the sewerage system in 
the said City of Charleston; and 

Whereas, at a meeting of the City Council of Charleston, held on 
the 15th day of July, 1921, the Committee on Ways and Means, to 
whom said petition was referred, reported that an examination of 
said petition and of the tax books of the City of Charleston showed 
that a majority of the free-holders of said city, as shown by the tax 
books, had signed said petition, the City Council of Charleston did, on 
the 15th day of July, 1921, order such election, and adopted the fol- 
lowing resolution: 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 249 

"Now, therefore, be it Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the 
City Council of Charleston, in Council, duly assembled: That a 
Special Election be held in the City of Charleston, on a date to be 
fixed by the Mayor, for the purpose of voting upon the following 
resolution, to wit : 

Shall the City of Charleston issue coupon bonds of the City of 
Charleston in denominations of one hundred dollars, five hunderd dol- 
lars, or one thousand dollars, aggregating in total the sum of five 
hundred thousand ($500,000.00) dollars, payable each and all of them 
forty years after their date of issue with the privilege of redemption 
after twenty (20) years, and bearing interest at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum, payable semiannually, the proceeds of which said 
bonds to be applied solely for the purchase, establishment, main- 
tenance and increase of the sewerage system of the City of Charleston. 

Resolved, further, That the said election is appointed to be held and 
shall be conducted in all respects in accordance with the statutes in 
such case, made and provided :" and 

Whereas, said election was duly and legally held on the 8th day of 
November, 1921, and the said question was legally decided in favor 
of the same, whereby the issue of said bonds is duly authorized to be 
made : Now, therefore : 

Be it ordained, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City Council of 
Charleston, S. C, in the City Council assembled, as follows : 

Section 1. It is hereby determined and declared that a majority 
of the qualified voters of the City of Charleston, voting at the election 
held November 8, 1921, voted in the affirmative on the question of the 
issuance of said bonds in accordance with the question submitted to 
them at said election as aforesaid. 

Section 2. There shall be issued coupon bonds of the City Council 
of Charleston not exceeding in the aggregate amount five hundred thou- 
sand ($500,000.00) dollars, the proceeds of which bonds to be used 
solely for the purpose of purchasing, establishing, extending and main- 
taining, the sewerage system throughout the city. Said bonds shall 
be dated March 1, 1923 and shall be payable January 1, 1963, and shall 
bear interest at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum, payable 
semi-annually on the first day of September and the first day of 
March of each year; and any and all bonds shall be subject to redemp- 
tion at the option of the said City Council of Charleston on March 
1, 1943, or any semi-annual interest date thereafter at the face amount 
of the bond and accrued interest upon notice published once in 
each of four (4) consecutive calendar weeks beginning not more 
than ninety (90) days before the date of redemption in a newspaper 
of general circulation of the city of New York and in a newspaper 
of general circulation in the City of Charleston. If the city shall 
elect to redeem less than the entire amount of the bonds outstand- 
ing the City Council shall cause to be determined by lot the bonds to 
be redeemed, and said notice shall in such case state the number of the 
bonds drawn by lot for redemption. 



250 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcziezu 

Section 3. Said bonds shall be signed by the Mayor and the City 
Treasurer and the Seal of the City Council ofCharleston attached, at- 
tested by the Clerk of Council and the signing of the coupons attach- 
ed to said bonds with the lithographed or engrossed fac-simile signature 
of the City Treasurer shall be a sufficient signing of the same. The 
form of the bond shall be substantially as follows: 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA 

CITY OF CHARLESTON 

SEWERAGE BOND 

No. Dollars. 



The City Council of Charleston, a municipal corporation in the 
State of South Carolina, for value received acknowledges itself in- 
debted and promises to pay the bearer the sum of 

dollars on the first day of March, 1963, and to pay interest thereon 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum semi-annually on the 
first day of September and the first day of March in each year, but 
only upon presentation and surrender as they severally mature, of 
the coupons therefor annexed hereto. Both the principal and inter- 
est of this bond are payable in lawful money of United States of 
America at the office of the City Treasurer in the City of Charleston, 

S. C, or at in the City of New York, at 

the option of the holder. 

This bond is subject to redemption on March 1st, 1943 or on any 
semi-annual interest date thereafter at the face amount of the 
bond and accrued interest, upon notice published once in each of 
four (4) successive weeks not more than ninety (90) days before the 
date of redemption in a newspaper of general circulation in the City 
of New York and in a newspaper of general circulation in the City 
of Charleston. 

This bond is one of a series of bonds of The City Council of 
Charleston issued for the purpose of purchasing, establishing, ex- 
tending and maintaining the sewerage S3'^stem throughout the said 
City of Charleston by virtue of the affirmative vote of a majority of 
the qualified and registered electors of the City of Charleston at an 
election held in said city on November 8th, 1921, which election was 
ordered upon petition of a majority of the free-holders of said city, 
as shown by its tax books: also by virtue of an ordinance ratified by 

the City Council of said city on the day of 

, 1923. 

It is hereby certified and recited that all deeds, acts and things re- 
quired by the constitution and statutes of the State of South Carolina, 
to exist, happen and be performed precedent to and in the issuance 
of this bond exist, have happened and have been performed, and 
that the issue of the bonds of which this is one, together with all 



Mayor Grace's Annual Reviezv 251 

the other indebtedness of said city, is within every debt and other 
limit prescribed by the constitution or laws of the said State. 

It is hereby agreed by and between the City Council of Charles- 
ton and every holder of this bond that the said The City Council of 
Charleston shall provide a sinking fund sufficient for the retirement 
of the issue of the bonds of which this is one. 

In Witness Whereof, the said The City Council of Charleston has 
caused this bond to be signed by the Mayor and City Treasurer of 
the City of Charleston, S. C, and the Seal of The City Council of 
Charleston attached, attested by the Clerk of Council, and the annexed 
coupons to be signed with the facsimile signature of the said City 
Treasurer, and this bond to be dated March 1st, 1923. 



Mayor, 

City Treasurer. 

Clerk of Council. 
(Form of Coupon.) 
No $.. 



On the first day of September, 1923, the City Council of Charles- 
ton, S. C, will pay to 'the bearer at the office of the City Treasurer 

of said city, or at Bank in the City of New York, at 

the option of the holder $ lawful money of the United 

States of America, being six (6) months' interest then due on its 
Sewerage Bond dated March 1, 1923, unless said bond shall have been 
called for previous redemption. 



City Treasurer. 

Section 4. There shall be assessed, levied and collected annually in 
addition to the annual tax levied for other purposes a sufficient 
annual tax upon the taxable property of the City of Charleston to meet 
the interest to become due upon said bonds, and also to raise the sum 
of one-fortieth part of the principal amount of said bonds as a 
sinking fund (which is hereby created) in aid of the retirement 
and payment of said bonds. 

Section 5. The Mayor and City Treasurer are hereby authorized 
and direected when said bonds are executed to sell same, either with 
or without demand for bids, as in their judgement is deemed advisable. 

Ratified February 14, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 
To confirm the Assessment Roll for the paving of the Roadway of 
Anson street, intersecting Pinckney street, and for the paving of 
the sidewalks on Calhoun street. Concord to Meeting street; Amer- 
ica street, Judith street to Hampstead Square; Alexander street, 



252 Mayor Grace's Aiuiiial Review 

Calhoun to Judith street; Cumberland street, East Bay to Church 

street; Hasell street, East Bay to Meeting street, and Church street, 

Broad to Pinckney street. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston, in City 
Council assembled : 

That the assessment rolls, prepared by the City Engineer and filed 
in the office of the City Treasurer, for the paving of the roadway 
of Anson street, intersecting Pinckney street, and for the paving of 
the sidewalks on Calhoun street. Concord to Meeting street; America 
street, Judith to Hampstead Square; Alexander street, Calhoun to 
Judith street, Cumberland street East Bay to Church street; Hasell 
street. East Bay to Meeting, and Church street, Broad to Pinckney 
street, be and the same are hereby, confirmed. 

Ratified April 24, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 
To amend an ordinance ratified and approved the 26th day of July, 
1922, entitled "An Ordinance to declare the amount outstanding 
and unpaid on assessments levied against abutting property to meet 
the costs of the permanent improvements on streets, the inter- 
section of streets and sidewalks and for curbing of streets and for 
drains in the City of Charleston, and to authorize the issuance of 
bonds in the amount of One Hundred and Ninety-three Thousand 
Dollars ($193,000.00), and to provide for their payment," by de- 
claring the correct amount of the outstanding and unpaid assess- 
ments against the abutting property on the streets set forth in 
said ordinance as appears by Assessment Lien Book, and provid- 
ing for a reduction of the amount of bonds to be issued from $193,- 
000 to $183,000. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen and City Council of the 
City of Charleston in Council assembled : 

Whereas, by an ordinance ratified the 26th day of July, 1922, en- 
titled "An ordinance to declare the amount outstanding and unpaid 
on assessments levied against abutting property to meet the costs 
of the permanent improvements on streets, the intersection of streets 
and sidewalks and for curbing of streets and for drains in the City 
of Charleston, and to authorize the issuance of One Hundred and 
Ninety-three Thousand Dollars ($193,000) and to provide for their 
payment," it was ordained that there was due to the City of Char- 
leston as appears by the Assessment Lien Book for outstanding 
and unpaid assessments on the assessments levied against abutting 
propert}' to meet the costs of the permanent improvement on said 
streets, the intersection of streets, and sidewalks and for curbing of 
streets and for drains in the City of Charleston, the sum of $193,- 
086.31 being the unpaid assessments levied on abutting property on 
the streets therein set forth: and 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 253 

Whereas, By a decision of the Supreme Court in action entitled 
"Henry A. M. Smith — vs. — City Council of Charleston," it was de- 
cided that assessments made for a drain laid previous to the 
adoption of the constitutional amendment, approved the 15th day 
of February, 1919, was unconstitutional and illegal, and, 

Whereas, such assessments have now been eliminated by the cancel- 
ing of such assessments for the drain laid on Meeting street, be- 
tween South Battery and Broad street, and on Radcliffe street, from 
St. Philip to King street, which drains were laid previous to said 
constitutional amendment and such cancellation has reduced the 
amount of outstanding and unpaid assessments as appears from the 
Assessment Lien Book to the sum of $183,330.00. 

Section 1. It is hereby declared that, as appears from the Asess- 
ment Lien Book of the City of Charleston, there is outstanding and 
unpaid on the assessm^ents levied against the abuting property on the 
streets set forth in said ordinance to meet the costs of permanent 
improvements on streets, the intersection of streets and sidewalks and 
for curbing of streets and for drains on said streets and sidewalks 
and for curbing of streets the sum of One Hundred and Eighty-three 
Thousand, Three Hundred and Thirty Dollars ($183,330.00). instead 
of the sum of One Hundred and Ninety- three Thousand and Eighty- 
Six Dollars and Thirty-six Cents ($193,086.36) as set forth in said 
ordinance. 

Section 2. That the amount of bonds of the City Council of Char- 
leston authorized to be issued under and by said ordinance be and is 
hereby reduced from $193,000 to $183,000 and the bonds authorized 
to be issued are hereby reduced from 193 bonds to 183 bonds and 
the said bonds provided in said ordinance to mature on the 1st day 
of August, 1923, are hereby changed so that the said bonds maturing on 
said date shall be bonds Nos. 177 to 183, inclusive. 

Section 3. All of the other provisions in said ordinance contained 
except as herein amended are hereby ratified and confirmed. 

Section 4. That the sale of said bonds heretofore made shall not in 
any way, except as to the amount thereof, be affected by this ordinance. 

Ratified April 24, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 
To repeal an Ordinance entitled "An Ordinance to declare the amount 
outstading and unpaid on assessments levied against abutting pro- 
perty to meet the cost of permanent improvements on Streets, 
intersection of Streets and sidewalks and for curbing streets and for 
drains in the City of Charleston.and to authorize the issuance of 
bonds in the amount of $160,000 and to provide for their payment," 
adopted and ratified November 14th, 1922. 

Be it ordaineed by the Mayor and Aldermen in City Council as- 
sembled, as follows: 



254 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

Section 1. That the Ordinance entitled "An Ordinance to declare the 
amount outstanding and unpaid on assessments levied against abutting 
property to meet the costs of permanent improvements on Streets, 
intersections of Streets and Sidewalks and for curbing of Streets 
and for drains in the City of Charleston, and to authorize the issu- 
ance of bonds in the amount of $160,000 and to provide for their 
payment, adopted and ratified the 14th day of Novemebcr, 1922, be and 
is hereby repealed. 

Ratified April 28, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 
To Confirm the Assessments for the improvements of Roadways on 
Church street, from Broad to Pinckney streets; Shepard street, 
from King street to Rutledge avenue; Carolina street, from King 
street to Rutledge avenue; Fishburne street, from King street to 
Rutledge avenue ; Sumter street, from King street to Rutledge 
avenue ; Percy Street, from Spring to Line streets ; Perry street, 
from Shepard to Sumter; Ogier street, from Calhoun to Vander- 
horst streets; Burns lane, from King to Meeting streets; New 
street, from Tradd to Broad streets ; Charlotte street, from Alex- 
ander to Washington streets, Calhoun street, from Meeting street to 
East end, with all intersections thereon, and for the Improvements 
of Sidewalks on Calhoun street, from King street to West end of 
Calhoun street; Anson street, from Pinckney to Calhoun streets; 
Calhoun street, from Concord to Meeting streets, America street, 
from Judith street to Hampstead Square, Alexander street, from 
Calhoun to Judith streets; Cumberland street, from East Bay to 
Church street; Hasell street, from East Bay to Meeting street; 
Church street, from Broad to Pinckney streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston in City 
Council assembled : 

Section 1. That the assessments as appear on the Assessment Roll 
filed in the office of the City Treasurer of the City of Charleson, 
S. C, for the improvement of roadways on Church street from Broad 
to Pinckney streets; Shepard street, from King Street to Rutledge 
Avenue, Carolina Street from King street to Rutledge Avenue, Fish- 
burne Street from King Street to Rutledge Avenue; Sumter Street from 
King Street to Rutledge Avenue, Percy Street from Spring to Line 
Streets, Perry Street from Shepard to Sumter Streets, Ogier Street 
from Calhoun to Vanderhorst Streets, Burns Lane from King to 
Meeting Streets, New street from Tradd to Broad Streets, Charlotte 
Street from Alexander to Washington Streets, Calhoun Street from 
Meeting Street to East end, with all intersections thereon; and for 
the improvements of sidewalks on Calhoun Street from King Street to 
West End of Calhoun Street, Anson Street from Pinckney to Cal- 
houn Streets, Calhoun street from Concord to Meeting Streets, Amer- 
ica Street from Judith Street to Hampstead Square, Alexander Street 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 255 

from Calhoun to Judith Streets, Cumberland Street from East Bay 
to Church Street, Hasel Street from East Bay to Meeting Street and 
Church Street from Broad to Pinckney Streets; be and the same 
are hereby confirmed. 
Ratified April 28, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 
To Declare the Amount Outstanding and Unpaid on Assessments 
Levied Against Abutting Property to Meet the Costs of Permanent 
Improvements on Streets, Intersections of Streets and Sidewalks 
and for Curbing of Streets and for Drains in the City of Charles- 
ton, and to Authorize the issuance of Bonds in the Amount of 
Two Hundred and Fifty-seven Thousand ($257,000) Dollars, and 
to Provide for Their Payment. 
Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. It is hereby declared that, as appears by the Assessment 
lyiens Book of the City of Charleston, there is outsanding and un- 
paid on the assessments levied against abutting property to meet 
the costs of permanent improvements on streets, the intersection of 
streets and sidewalks and for curbing of the streets and for drains 
in 'the City of Charleston the sum of Two Hundred and Fifty-nine 
Thousand, Eight Hundred and One and eighty-four one hundredths 
($259,801.84) Dollars, being unpaid assessments on abutting property 
on the following streets : For roadway improvements on Anson street, 
from Pinckney to Calhoun streets; Alexander street, from Calhoun 
to Judith streets ; America street, from Judith to Amherst streets ; 
Cumberland street, from East Bay to Church streets; Hasell street, 
from East Bay to Meeting streets. Church street, from Broad to 
Pinckney street; Sheipard street, from King street to Rutledge ave- 
nue; Carolina street, from King street to Rutledge avenue; Fishbume 
street, from King street to Rutledge avenue; Sumter street, from 
King street to Rutledge avenue ; Percy street, from King to Line 
streets; Perry street, from Shepard to Sumter street; Ogier street, 
from Calhoun to Vanderhorst streets ; Burns lane, from King to 
Meeting streets ; New street, from Tradd to Broad streets ; Char- 
lotte street, from Alexander to Washington street ; Calhoun street, 
from Meeting street to East end and for sidewalk improvements on 
Radcliffe street, from King street to Rutledge avenue; Smith street, 
from Vanderhorst to Radcliffe streets ; Calhoun street, from King 
street to West end of Calhoun street; Anson street from Pinckney 
to Calhoun streets; Calhoun street, from Concord to Meeting street; 
America street, from Judith street to Hampstead Square ; Alexander 
street, from Calhoun to Judith streets ; Cumberland street, from East 
Bay to Church streets ; Hasell street, from East Bay to Meeting streets, 
and Church street, from Broad to Pinckney streets; and that no bonds 
or certificates of indebtedness have been issued by the City Council 



256 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

of Charleston for the payment of which the revenue derii ed from said 
assessments has been directed to be used. 

Section 2. That the revenue derived from the assessments above 
set forth is hereby directed to be devoted solely and exclusively to 
the payment of the bonds hereinafter authorized to be issued. 

Section 3. That bonds of the City Council of Charleston be issued in 
the sum of Two Hundred and Fifty-seven Thousand ($257,000) 
Dollars, in denominations of One Thousand ($1,000) Dollars each, 
to be dated the 1st day of May, 1923, and to bear interest at the rate 
of six (6%) per cent per annum, unless a lower rate of interest shall 
be determined on by the Mayor and City Treasurer at the time of the 
sale of said bonds, payable semi-annually on the 1st days of May and 
November of each year, both principal and interest to be payable at 
the office of the City Treasurer in the City of Charleston, S. C, or 
at the Bankers Trust Company, in the City of New York, N. Y., at the 
option of the holder. Said bonds shall be designated "Series B Street 
Paving Bonds," and shall be numbered one to two hundred and 
fifty-seven (1 to 257), inclusive, consecutively, and shall mature as 
follows : 

Bonds Nos. 1 to 26, inclusive, on May 1st, 1925. 

Bonds Nos. 27 to 52, inclusive, on May 1st, 1926. 

Bonds Nos. 53 to 78, inclusive, on May 1st, 1927. 

Bonds Nos. 79 to 104, inclusive, on May 1st, 1928. 

Bonds Nos. 105 to 130, inclusive on May 1st, 1929. 

Bonds Nos. 131 to 156, inclusive, on May 1st, 1930. 

Bonds Nos. 157 to 182, inclusive, on May 1st, 1931. 

Bonds Nos. 183 to 207, inclusive, on May 1st, 1932. 

Bonds No. 208 to 232, inclusive, on May 1st, 1933. 

Bonds Nos. 233 to 257 inclusive, on May 1st, 1934. 

That the form of the said bonds, with coupons attached, and the ex- 
ecution thereof shall be in the form and manner as is set forth in the 
ordinance of City Council of Charleston, ratified April 18, 1922 entitled 
"An Ordinance declaring the result of the special election held in the 
City of Charleston, South Carolina, on the 8th day of November, 1921, 
and providing for the issuance by the City Council of Charleston of 
bonds or certificates of indebtedness or both, for the purpose of paying 
the costs of placing permanent improvements on streets," etc. 

Section 4. That for the payment of the interest on said bonds and 
for the purpose of creating a sinking fund for the payment of said 
bonds, as they mature, the City Council of Charleston does hereby 
assess, levy and collect, in addition to the annual taxes levied for other 
purposes, a sufficient annual tax upon the taxable property in the City 
of Charleston to meet the interest to become due upon said bonds and 
also to provide and raise such part of the sinking fund in aid of the 
retirement and payment of said bonds as it is advisable or necessary to 
provide and raise annually therefor, and that said taxes be levied and 
collected, and that the sinking fund created for the payment of said 
bonds be kept separate and distinct : Provided the amount set apart as 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 257 

a sinking fund annually shall not exceed the necessary fractional amount 
to provide for an aggregate sum sufficient for the retirement of the 
said bonds on their maturities, respectively; provided, the amount of 
such taxes levied in any year may be reduced by the amount of the 
funds then on hand derived from the collection of assessments on prop- 
erty abutting on the streets hereinbefore set forth and which revenue 
has hereinbefore been pledged to the payment of said bonds. 

Section 5. That said bonds shall be sold by the Mayor and the City 
Treasurer either with or without advertisement for bids as in their 
judgement is deemed advisable. 
^ Ratified April 28, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 
To amend an ordinance declaring the result of a special electing held 
in the City of Charleston, South Carolina, on the eighth day of 
November, 1921, providing for the issuance of $500,000 bonds of the 
City of Charleston for the purchase, establishment, maintenance and 
increase of the sewerage system of the City of Charleston, and to 
authorize the issue of sewerage bonds by the City Council of Char- 
leston to an amount not exceeding $500,000. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston in City 
Council assembled, that Section 2 of the above entitled Ordinance, 
ratifi'ed February 13, 1923, be amended by striking out on line twelve 
of said Section 2, the words "January 1, 1963," and insert in lieu 
thereof the words ''March 1, 1963," so that said Section 2 when amended 
shall read as follows : 

"Section 2. There shall be issued coupon bonds of the City Council 
of Charleston not exceeding in the aggregate amount five hundred 
thousand ($500,000) dollars, the proceeds of which bonds to be used 
solely for the purpose of purchasing establishing, extending and main- 
taining the sewerage system throughout the city. Said bonds shall be 
dated March 1, 1923 and shall be payable March 1 1963, and shall 
bear interest at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum, payable semi- 
annually on the first day of September and the first day of March of 
each year; and any and all bonds shall be subject to redemption at 
the option of the said City Council of Charleston on March 1, 1943, or 
any semi-annual interest date thereafter at the face amount of the 
bond and accrued interest upon notice published once in each of four 
(4) consecutive calendar weeks, beginning not more than ninety (90) 
days before the date of redemption in a newspaper of general circulation 
of the city of New York and in a newspaper of general circulatoin in 
the City of Charleston. If the city shall elect to redeem less than 
the entire amount of the bonds outstanding the City Council shall 
cause to be determined by lot the bonds to be redeemed, and said 
notice shall in such case state the number of the bonds drawn by lot 
for redemption." 
Ratified April 28, 1923. 



258 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviczv 

AN ORDINANCE 
To declare the amount outstanding and unpaid on assessments le- 
vied aganist abutting property to meet the cost of permanent improve- 
ments on streets, intersections of streets and sidewalks and for 
curbing of streets and for drains in the City of Charlesion and to 
authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of Three hundred and 
seventy-five Thousand ($375,000.00) dollars and to provide for their 
payment. 

Be It Ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston in City 
Council assembled, as follows : 

Section 1. It is hereby declared that as appears by the Assessment 
Lien Book of the City of Charleston there is outstanding and un- 
paid on the assessments levied against abutting property to meet 
the costs of permanent improvements on streets, the intersections of 
streets and sidewalks and for curbing of the streets and for drains 
in the City of Charleston the sum of Three hundred and seventy- 
five thousand five hundred and forty and 96-100 ($375,540.96) dollars, 
being unpaid assessments on abutting property on the following streets: 
for roadway improvements on Bogard street from St. Philip street to 
Rutlcdge Avenue; Logan Street from Broad Street to Beaufain 
Street; Charles Street from Queen Street to Beaufain Street; Mill 
Street from Ashley Avenue to Lucas Street; Magazine Street from 
Charles Street to Logan Street ; St. Philip Street from Line Street 
to Carolina Street; Market Street (north side) from East Bay Street 
to Meeting Street; Warren Street from King Street to Smith Street; 
Doughty Street from Lucas Street to President Street; Coming Street 
from Beaufain Street to Sumter Street; Vanderhorst Street from 
King Street to Rutledge Avenue; Nassau Street from Mary Street to 
Lee Street; Bee Street from Rutledge Avenue to West End; Am- 
herst and Wolfe Streets from Bay Street to King Street; Frankliii 
Street from Broad Street to Magazine Street; Elizabeth Street from 
Calhoun Street to Mary Street; King Street from Ladson Street to 
Broad Street ; Judith Street from America Street to Elizabeth Street ; 
Trumbo Street from Trapman Street to Rutledge Avenue; Trap- 
man Street from Broad Street to Queen Street; Pitt Street from 
Beaufain Street to Calhoun Street; Lambol Street from King Street 
to Legare Street; Horlbeck Street from Meeting to King Street; 
Magazine Street from Logan Street to Franklin Street; Wilson Street 
from Magazine Street to Beaufain Street; Wall Street from Laurens 
Street to Calhoun Street; Lucas Street from Calhoun Street to 
Doughty Street; and that no bonds or certif^icates of indebtedness have 
been issued by the City Council of Charleston, for the payment of 
which the revenue derived from said assessments has been direct- 
ed to be used. 

Section 2. That the revenue derived from the assessments above 
set forth is hereby directed to be devoted solely and exclusively to 
the payment of the bonds hereinafter authorized to be issued. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviczv . 259 

Section. 3. That bonds of the City Council of Charleston be issued 
in the sum of Three hundred and seventy-five throusand ($375,000.00) 
dollars in denominations of One thousand ($1,000.00) dollars each 
to be dated the first day of November, 1923, and to bear interest at 
the rate of six (6) per cent per annum, unless a lower rate of in- 
terest shall be determined upon by the Mayor and City Treasurer at 
the time of the sale of said bonds, payable semi-annually on the first 
days of November and May of each year, both principal and interest 
to be payable at the Office of the City Treasurer in the City of 
Charleston, S. C, or at the Bankers Trust Company in the City of 
New York, N. Y., at the option of the holder. Said bonds shall be 
designated "Series C Street Paving Bonds," and shall be numbered one 
to three hundred and seventy-five (1 to 375) inclusive, consecutively, 
and shall mature as follows : 
Inclusive Due 

1 to 37 November 1, 1925 

38 to 74 — November 1, 1926 

75 to 111 November 1, 1927 

112 to 148 „ _ November 1, 1928 

149 to 185 November 1, 1929 

186 to 223 _ - November 1, 1930 

224 to 261 November 1, 1931 

262 to 299 - - November 1, 1932 

300 to 337 November 1, 1933 

338 to 375 November 1, 1934 

That the form of the said bonds with coupons attached and the ex- 
ecution thereof shall be in the form and manner as is set forth in 
the ordinance of City Council of Charleston ratified April 18th, 1922, 
entitled "An Ordinance declaring the result of the special election 
held in the City of Charleston, South Carolina, on the 8th day of 
November, 1921, t,nd providing for the issuance by the City Council 
of bonds or certificates of indebtedness or both, for the purpose of 
paying the cost of placing of permanent improvements on Streets etc." 

Section. 4 That for the payment of the interest on said bonds and 
for the purpose of creating a sinking fund for the payment of said 
bond as they mature, the City Council of Charleston does hereby 
assess, levy and collect in addition to the annual taxes levied for other 
purposes a sufficient annual tax upon the taxable property in the 
City of Charleston to meet the interest to become due upon said bonds 
and also to provide and raise such part of the sinking fund in aid 
of the retirement and payment of said bonds as it is advisable or 
necessary to provide and raise annually therefor; and that said taxes 
be levied and collected, and that the sinking fund created for the pay- 
ment of said bonds be kept separate and distinct ; provided, the 
amount set apart as a sinking fund annually shall not exceed the 
necessary fractional amount to provide for an aggregate sum suf- 
ficient for the retirement of said bonds on their maturities respec- 
tively; provided, the amount of such taxes levied in any year may 



260 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 

be reduced by the amount of the funds then on hand derived from 
the collection of assessments on property abutting on the streets here- 
inbefore set forth and which revenue has hereinbefore been pledged 
to the payment of said bonds. 

Section 5. The said bonds shall be sold by the Mayor and City 
Treasurer either with or without advertisement for bids as in their 
judgement is deemed advisable. 

Ratified October 10, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 
To Regulate the Hours of Work and Scale af Wages to Govern All 

Public Work Performed by or for the City of Charleston and Paid 

for Out of Public Funds. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Charleston 
in City Council assembled : 

Section 1. The service of all laborers, workman and mechanics, 
hereafter employed by the City of Charleston, or by any contractor 
or subcontractor, for or upon any public works of said City, is hereby 
restricted to eight hours in any one calendar day, except in cases of 
extraordinary emergency ; and all such laborers, workmen and me- 
chanics shall receive and be paid not less than the scale of wages pre- 
vailing among the various crafts so employed. 

Section 2. Every contract, excluding contracts for the purchase of 
material or supplies, to which the City of Charleston is a party, which 
may involve the employment of laborers, workmen or mechanics, 
shall contain a stipulation that no laborer, workmen or mechanic, 
working in said City, in the employ of the contractor or subcontractor, 
or other person doing or contracting to do the whole or a part of 
the work contemplated by the contractor, shall be requested or required 
to work more than eight hours in any one calendar day, and shall al- 
so contain a stipulation that all such laborers, workmen and me- 
chanics-shall be paid not less than the scale of wages prevailing 
among the various crafts so employed ; and every such contract which 
does not contain these stipulations shall be null and void. 

Section 3. This Act shall take effect upon its approval by the Mayor 

Ratified November 13, 1923. 



AN ORDINANCE 
To Prevent Auction Sales After Sunset. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston, in City 
Council assembled, that on and after the passage of this bill all sales 
of goods by public auction in the City of Charleston, by an auctioneer, 
shall be made in the daytime, between sunrise and sunset. 

Ratified November 13, 1923. 



Mayor Grace's Annual Review 261 

AN ORDINANCE 
To Confirm the Assessment Rolls for the Improvement of Roadway* 
on Bogard street, from St. Philip street to Rutledge avenue; Logan 
street, from Broad to Beaufain; Charles street, from Queen to 
Beaufain; Mill street, from Ashley to Lucas; Magazine street, 
from Charles to Logan; St. Philip street, from Line to Carolina, 
Market street (north side), from East Bay to Meeting; Warren 
street, from King to Smith ; Doughty street, from Lucas to Presi- 
dent; Coming street, from Beaufain to Sumter; Vanderhorst street, 
from King to Rutledge ; Nassau street, from Mary to Lee ; Bee 
street, from Rutledge to West End ; Amherst and Woolfe streets, 
from Bay to King ; Franklin street, from Broad to Magazine ; 
Elizabeth street, from Calhoun to Mary; King street, from Ladson 
to Broad ; Judith street, from America to Elizabeth ; Trumbo 
street, from Trapman to Rutledge ; Trapman street, from Broad 
to Queen; Pitt street, from Beaufain to Calhoun; Lamboll street, 
from King to Legare ; Horlbeck street, from Meeting to King; Mag- 
azine street, from Logan to Franklin ; Wilson street, from Magazine 
to Beaufain; Wall street, from Laurens to Calhoun; Lucas street, 
from Calhoun to Doughty. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of Charleston, in City 
Council assembled : 

That the Assessement Rolls prepared by the City Engineer and 
filled in the City Treasury Department for the paving of roadways on 
Bogard street, from St. Philip street to Rutledge avenue ; Logan street 
from Broad to Beaufain; Charles street, from Queen to Beaufain; 
Mill street, from Ashley to Lucas ; Magazine street, from Charles 
to Logan; St. Philip street, from Line to Carolina; Market street 
(north side), from East Bay to Meeting; Warren street, from King 
to Smith ; Doughty street, from Lucas to President ; Coming street, 
from Beaufain to Sumter; Vanderhorst street, from King to Rutledge; 
Nassau street, from Mary to Lee ; Bee street, from Rutledge to 
West End; Amherst and Woolfe streets, from Bay to King; Frank- 
lin street, from Broad to Magazine; Elizabeth street, from Calhoun 
to Mary; King street, from Ladson to Broad; Judith street, from 
America to Elizabeth ; Trumbo street, from Trapman to Rutledge ; 
Trapman street, from Broad to Queen; Pitt street, from Beaufain to 
Calhoun; Lamboll street, from King to Legare; Horlbeck street, 
from Meeting to King; Magazine street, from Logan to Franklin; 
Wilson street, from Magazine to Beaufain; Wall street, from Laurens 
to Calhoun; Lucas street, from Calhoun to Doughty, be, and the same 
are hereby, confirmed. 

Ratified November 13, 1923. 



262 Mayor Grace's Annual Rcviezv 

ACTS OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY— 1923 

No. 108. 

AN ACT to Amend Section 2471 of the Code of Laws of 1912, 
being Section 3801 of the Code of Laws of 1922, and Section 
2472 of the Code of Laws of 1912, being Section 3802 of the 
Code of Laws of 1922, Relating to Pilotage and Harbor Com- 
mission. 

Section I. Sec. (3581), 1922 Code. Vol. Ill, Civil Code, (Sec. 
(3801) Tentative Code) Amended — Personnel of Sub-Com^nittee 
of Board of Harbor Commissioners of Port of Charleston — 
Appeals from Sub-Committee — Be it enacted by the General Assem- 
bly of the State of South Carolina. That Section 2471 of the Code of 
Laws of South Carolina, 1912, being Section 3801 of the Code of Laws 
of South Carolina, 1922, be and the same is hereby, amended by strik- 
ing out the last line of said section and inserting in lieu thereof the 
following: "The Chairman of the Port Utilities Commission of Char- 
leston shall be a member of said sub-Committee and the decisions of 
said sub-Committee shall be subject to appeal to the Board of Harbor 
Commissioners of the Port of Charleston, said appeal to be taken and 
to be conducted in accordance with the law, rules and regulations as set 
forth in Paragraphs 397, 398, 399, 401, 403, 405, 406 and 407,, Chapter 
3 of the Code of Civil Procedure of South Carolina, 1912, entitled 
'Appeal to the Circuit Court from an Inferior Court,' " so that said 
section, when so amended, shall read as follows : 

"Section 2471 (being 3801 of the Code of Laws of South Caro- 
lina, 1922). The Commissioners of Pilotage of Little River shall con- 
sist of three persons, two of whom shall be or shall have been seafar- 
ing men and one shall be a full branch pilot of the port to which he 
belongs. 

The Commissioners of Pilotage of Georgetown shall consist of 
six persons, two of whom shall be or shall have been seafaring men, 
one of whom shall be a full branch pilot, and three of whom shall be 
merchants of said town. 

The Commissioners of Pilotage of Beaufort shall consist of. four 
persons, two of whom shall be or shall have been seafaring men. They 
shall have jurisdiction over St. Helena, Port Royal and all entrances 
to the Southward. 

The Commissioners of Pilotage of North and South Edisto and 
Stono shall consist of three persons, two of whom shall be or shall have 
been seafaring men, and shall have jurisdiction over North and South 
Edisto, Stono River and all entrances to the same. 

The Board of Harbor Commissioners of the Port of Charleston 
shall be the Commissioners of Pilotage for said port, and may invest 
the sub-Committee of Pilotage of said Board with all the power and 
authority in all matters relating to the pilotage and pilots of said port 
of Charleston possessed by said Board, the Chairman of the Port 
Utilities Commission of Charleston shall be a member of said sub- 
Committee and the decisions of said sub-Committee shall be subject 
to appeal to the Board of Harbor Commissioners of the Port of Char- 
leston, said appeal to be taken and to be conducted in accordance with 
the law, rules and regulations as set forth in paragraphs 397, 398, 399, 
401, 403, 405, 406, and 407, Chapter 3, of the Code of Civil Procedure 
of South Carolina, 1912, entitled 'Appeal to the Circuit Court from an 
Inferior Court.' " 



Mayor Grace's Aiimial Rcviezv 263 

§ 2. Sec. (3582), 1922, Code, Vol. Ill, Civil Code, (Sec. 
(3802) Tentative Code) Amended — Percsonncl of Board of Har- 
bor Commissioners of Port of Charleston — That Section 2472 of 
Code of 1922 be, and the same is hereby, amended by striking out the 
Code of 1922, be, an dthe same is hereby, amended by striking out the 
words "President of the Charleston Merchants' Exchange" on line 
five (5) of said section, and inserting in lieu thereof the following: 
"The Chairman of the Port Utilities Commission of Charleston," and 
further amend by striking out the words "President of the Charleston 
Young Men's Business League," on line six(6) and inserting in lieu 
thereof the following: "The President of the Charleston Young Men's 
Board of Trade" so that said section, when so amended, shall read 
as follows : 

Section 2472. (being Section 3802 of the Code of 1922). The 
Board of Harbor Commissioners of the Port of Charleston shall con- 
sist of thirteen members as follows: The Mayor of the City of Char- 
leston the President of the Charleston Chamber of Commerce, the 
President of the Charleston Cotton Exchange, the Chairman of the 
Port Utilities Commission of Charleston, the President of the Char- 
leston Young Men's Board of Trade, the Chairman of the Executive 
Committee of the State Board of Health, if he be a resident of said 
city, or, if he be not such resident, some member of the Executive 
Committee resident of said city to be designated by said Committee, 
and seven (7) residents of the said city of Charleston to be appointed 
by the Governor, upon the recommendation of the Senator and mem- 
bers of the House of Representatives from Charleston County, or a 
majority of them, at least two of whom shall be seafaring men and at 
least one of such seafaring men shall be a full branch pilot of the Port 
of Charleston. The Mayor of the City of Charleston shall be ex-officio 
Chairman of the said Board, and the Board at its first annual meeting 
or at the first meeting after the time fixed for such annual meeting, 
shall elect a Chairman pro tempore, to act in the temporary absence, 
death, resignation or disability of the said Chairman. 

§ 3. This Act shall take effect immediately upon its approval by 
the Governor. 

Approved the 16th day of March A. D. 1923. 



264 Mayor Grace's Annual Review 



Jn iH^mnrmm 



George Walton Williams 

Born January 20, 1860. 
Died April 27, 1923. 



ALDERMAN 

City of Charleston, 
Twelve Years, 

COMMISSIONER 

Charleston Orphan House, 
Twenty Years. 



ALDERMAN 

John Woliltniann 

Born January 30, 1864 
Died August 7, 1923 



ALDERMAN 

Oscar Edward Johnson 

Born December 25, 1853 
Died October 10, 1923 



HECKMAN l+J ll 
BINDERY INC. Igf ' '